North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 112, ISSUE 14
Students to rally against hikes
CAMPUS LEADERS MOTIVATE PEERS
TO ATTEND FRIDAY BOG MEETING
BY JAMIE MCGEE
STAFF WRITER
Citing concerns that the UNC-system
Board of Governors not only could
approve a tuition increase, but also could
shift funds away from financial aid, mem
bers of student government are rallying
students to attend the board’s meeting
Friday.
The BOG’s Budget and Finance
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James McCleary walks along Franklin Street on Wednesday afternoon dressed as a leprechaun. McCleary, whose great-grandparents are from Ireland, has dressed up
every St. Patrick's Day since 1998. Below: Sophomore Charles Gillespie (left to right) and juniors Daniel Cohen and Josh Gold toast with green beer at Top of the Hill.
COLORFUL REVELS
MARK ST. PATRICK’S DAY
BY ASHLEY DUNCAN
STAFF WRITER
Chapel Hill resembled Ireland on Wednesday with
drizzly weather and cold temperatures, and there was
no lack of Irish spirit on Saint Patrick’s Day.
Local residents and students celebrated through
out the day, dressing in green clothing, eating tradi
tional Irish fare offered by restaurants and, of course,
drinking green beer.
Top of the Hill Restaurant & Brewery dyed its
Summer Lager with green coloring to celebrate the
holiday. One dollar from each green beer was donat
ed to the Cornucopia House Cancer Support Center.
The largest party, however, was at W.B. Yeats Irish
Pub, where the beer was not green.
“I find it personally offensive to dye beer. I will not
do it,” owner Dan Markscheid said. He did concede
that guests who wanted green beer could receive a few
drops of color in light beers.
“I will (dye the beer green) if guests request it in
their Bud Light. Or Harp. I guess we could do Harp,
too. But only by request.”
Markscheid estimated that the restaurant served
between 500 and 600 people for lunch and dinner
and expected more than 2,000 between 8 p.m. and
3 a.m. “Saint Patrick’s Day is by far the biggest day for
us,” Markscheid said.
Contest winner heads to tourney
Rathskeller supplies tickets to Denver
BYAYOFEMI KIRBY
STAFF WRITER
While most UNC students will
watch the Tar Heels play the Air
Force Academy in the first round
of the NCAA Men’s Basketball
Tournament on CBS tonight, stu
dents Jason Waller and Nikki
Binz will be watching from the
stands.
After winning a ball toss com
petition during Late Night With
INSIDE
EDITOR SELECTION
Learn more about the three candidates
running for 2004-05 DTH editor PAGE 2
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
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Committee will meet today to discuss
campus-based tuition increases at UNC
system schools. The full board will vote
on the proposals Friday.
UNC-Chapel Hill Student Body
President Matt Tepper said he hopes that
the BOG will not approve the UNC-CH
Board of Trustees’ proposal to increase
out-of-state tuition by $1,500 and in
state tuition by S3OO for the 2004-05
W.B. Yeats and Avalon, a dance club, worked
together to set up a large heated tent to accommodate
the crowds.
Jak Reeves, a UNC alumnus, sipped Guinness beer
at W.B. Yeats. “It is such a fun holiday,” he said. “We’re
not really Irish, we just came to hang out.”
Dave Brown came to W.B. Yeats after traveling to
Ireland and developing a taste for Guinness.
“We are going to eat a lot and drink a lot of
Guinness,” he said.
W.B. Yeats also used the holiday to host a fund-rais-
Roy in October, Waller received
tickets from the Ram’s Head
Rathskeller to the first round UNC
game of the NCAA tournament.
He decided to take Binz, his girl
friend.
Tve been a huge Carolina bas
ketball fan all my life,” Waller said.
“I grew up coming to all the foot
ball and basketball games when I
could.”
Waller and Binz will depart for
INSIDE
DIVERSIONS
Cartoons are no longer just for kids thanks
to animation geared toward adults PAGE 5
www.dailytavheelxom
school year.
“You never know what will happen,”
Tepper said. “Students will be there on
Friday to have last minute conversations
and to show interest, to show their dis
pleasure, and for out-of-state students,
their disgust about the proposal. Carolina
students are concerned about the out-of
state increase.”
UNC-CH Provost Robert Shelton said
he has heard that need-based financial
aid might be at stake during Friday’s vote.
The current proposal sets aside 40 per
cent of all revenues generated by the
increase for need-based aid.
DTH/SAMKIT SHAH
the Pepsi Center in Denver at 9
a.m. today and arrive around 1
p.m.
The UNC men’s basketball team
will play at 9:40 p.m.
“I went to the ACC Tournament
last weekend, and that was a little
disappointing,” he said. “But I
think this will be better.”
At Late Night With Roy, minia
ture basketballs, autographed by
UNC basketball players, were
tossed into the air.
Participants were required to
pick up as many of the balls as they
“I’ve heard they might not allow
money for the need-based aid,” Shelton
said. “That would be a blow, but nothing
is definite.”
Tepper sent an e-mail Wednesday to
his Cabinet members urging them to rally
students to attend the meeting and point
ing to the risk of financial aid being elim
inated from the proposal.
“There is real potential for the BOG to
do something to really harm the student
body when they are trying to help,”
Tepper said. “We want need-based aid for
SEE OPPOSITION, PAGE 4
er for St. Baldrick’s, an organization that raises money
for the National Childhood Cancer Foundation.
St. Baldrick’s recruits people to shave their heads
in support of children who lose their hair from cancer
treatment. Twenty-one volunteers, including UNC
Undergraduate Admissions Director Jerry Lucido,
shaved their heads at W.B. Yeats to raise more than
$20,000.
“We certainly hope to make this an annual event,"
said Jane Hoppen, an employee of the Redwoods
Group, the insurance firm that sponsored the fund
raiser.
Bub O’Malley’s offered a smaller celebration with
green domestic beers and Guinness beer specials for
party-goers.
Manager Lloyd Rippe didn’t know how many peo
ple would spend the holiday at his bar. “We’ll take
however many we can get. Other places go over the
top, and that’s where the crowds will be, but we have
a good time here,” he said.
Chapel Hill Police spokeswoman Jane Cousins said
the police department was not expecting any trouble.
“St. Patrick’s Day doesn’t tend to be that wild in
Chapel Hill.”
Contact the City Editor
at citydesk@unc.edu.
could in one minute and place
them into a bag.
Francis Henry, owner of the
Rathskeller, said Waller beat his
opponents by one ball.
The Rathskeller has served
members of the Chapel Hill com
munity since 1948 and supports
the University by sponsoring activ
ities such as this one.
“It’s a package deal we’re giving
them,” Henry said. “(ESPN sports
anchor) Stuart Scott told me that it
SEE RATHSKELLAR, PAGE 4
SPORTS
SHUT DOWN
Robert Woodard throws five solid innings to
lead the Tar Heels past Princeton PAGE 11
Latino
studies
minor
created
Will focus on Latino
culture within U.S.
BY LAUREN HARRIS
STAFF WRITER
UNC will be one of the first universities in
the Southeast to offer a minor in Latina-
Latino Studies beginning next fall.
“(The minor is) quite an accomplishment
for UNC, considering that North Carolina
has the highest percentage rise in Latinos in
all the U.S,” said English Professor Maria
DeGuzman, the program’s director.
She said the interdisciplinary minor will
be housed in the Department of English and
will consist of five courses: one core course
from the humanities curriculum, one core
course from the social sciences and three
electives from the two categories.
“There is quite a lot of flexibility between
that balance,” DeGuzman said. “Right now
there are 19 courses that satisfy the minor.”
She said that classes in anthropology,
drama, English, geography, history, music,
public policy, Spanish and African and Afro-
American Studies will be included in the
minor.
Students who are interested in pursuing
the minor should contact Jason Clemmons,
an administrative assistant in the English
department.
DeGuzman emphasized the importance
of learning about Latino culture.
“There is a tremendous cultural develop-
SEE LATINO STUDIES, PAGE 4
Moeser’s
raise to aid
employees
BY AMY KINGSLEY
STAFF WRITER
A $25,000 bonus Chancellor James
Moeser originally declined now will fund
programs intended to improve workplace
conditions for University employees.
The money will go to a one-time start-up
fund for programs recommended by the
Chancellor’s Task Force for a Better
Workplace.
UNC-system President Molly Broad
rewarded chancellors of system schools in
January with bonuses ranging from $12,101
to $25,599.
Moeser decided to accept the $25,000
bonus that he originally declined because
staff members have received minimal or no
pay increases.
Moeser was not available for comment
Wednesday.
In February, an employee suggested that
Moeser use the money to fimd campus needs,
leading to the creation of the start-up fund.
“This is a positive beginning,” said
Katherine Graves, vice chairwoman of the
Employee Forum and a member of the task
force. “There are a lot of good projects that
need funding.”
Since the money from Moeser is a one
time contribution, it likely will be used to
fund some of the smaller programs that do
not require sustained funding.
Among the short-term recommendations
SEE FUND, PAGE 4
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DTH/PHOTOG NA
Jason Walker won tickets to the UNC first-round NCAA tournament game
from the Ram's Head Rathskeller and is taking his girlfriend, Nikki Binz.
WEATHER
TODAY P.M. showers, H 56, L 44
FRIDAY Sunny, H 67, L 32
SATURDAY Sunny, H 65, L 46
THURSDAY, MARCH 18, 2004
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