North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 112, ISSUE 30
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS/MURAD SEZER
U.S. Marines pray over a fallen comrade at a first-aid point after he died from wounds suffered in fighting in Fallujah, Iraq, last week. Hundreds of U.S. Marines have
been fighting insurgents in several neighborhoods in the western Iraqi city in order to regain control of the city. Sixteen U.S. troops have been killed in Iraq since Friday.
CEASE-FIRE PUTS END
TO DEADLY UPRISING
Iraqis , soldiers mourn casualties of intense fighting between Marines , Sunni insurgents
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BAGHDAD, Iraq A fragile cease-fire
held between Sunni insurgents and Marines
on Sunday in the besieged city of Fallujah,
where Iraqis said more than 600 civilians
were killed in the past week. Near Baghdad,
gunmen shot down a U.S. attack helicopter,
killing two crew members.
Also, the military suggested it’s open to a
negotiated solution in its showdown with a
radical Shiite cleric in the south.
Most of the Iraqis killed in Fallujah in
fighting that started last Monday were
women, children and elderly, the director of
the city hospital, Rafie al-Issawi, told The
Associated Press. A Marine commander dis
puted that, saying most of the dead were
probably insurgents.
Fallujah residents took advantage of the
lull in fighting to bury their dead in two soc
cer fields. One of the fields had rows of fresh
ly dug graves, softie marked on headstones as
children or with the names of women.
The Fallujah violence spilled over to the
nearby western entrance of Baghdad, where
gunmen shot down an AH-64 Apache heli
copter. Asa team moved in to secure the bod
ies of the two dead crewmen, a large force of
tanks and troops pushed down the highway
outside the Iraqi capital, aiming to crush
insurgents.
Gunmen have run rampant in the Abu
WAR COUNT
59
U.S. soldiers killed
since anew wave of
violence began April 4
900
Iraqi citizens
killed during that
same period
661
U.S. soldiers who have
died in Iraq since
March 2003
10
U.S. soldiers killed
in fighting Sunday
in Iraq
College issues on
hopefuls’ plates
Play small part in race for governor
BYCLEVE R. WOOTSON JR.
STATE & NATIONAL EDITOR
The biggest concern for the
Republican candidates vying for
the governor’s seat this year is not
the UNC system.
North Carolina is floundering,
trying to escape from the state’s
worst economic slump since the
Great Depression. Thousands of
state residents are unsuccessfully
looking for work.
Gubernatorial candidate
George Little, a businessman from
Southern Pines, summed it up at a
forum last Wednesday when he
said the main issue of this race is
“jobs, jobs, jobs.”
But the candidates for the
SPORTS
WINNING FOR A SPELL
Paul Spellman leads UNC to a win against
the defending NCAA champions PAGE 12
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
(She iatht oar Hrri
state’s highest office have chimed
in on the status of the UNC sys
tem, its students and the tuition
increases the students have faced
in past years.
Little admits that he is a lot
more familiar with the state’s
community colleges, having
served on the Board of Trustees at
Sandhills Community College for
23 years.
He says his wife, Teena Little,
former vice-chairwoman of the
UNC-system Board of Governors,
is the university expert.
The community colleges are
doing the majority of the pivotal
SEE TUITION, PAGE 4
www.dailytarheel.com
WAR IN IRAQ
Ghraib district west of Baghdad for three
days, attacking fuel convoys, killing a U.S. sol
dier and two U.S. civilians and kidnapping
another American.
The captors of Thomas Hamill, a
Mississippi native who works for a U.S. con
tractor in Iraq, threatened to kill and burn
him unless U.S. troops ended their assault on
Fallujah, which is west of Baghdad, by 6 a.m.
Sunday. The deadline passed with no word on
Hamill’s fate.
Insurgents who kidnapped other foreign
ers this week began releasing some captives.
A Briton was freed, and other kidnappers said
they were freeing eight captives of various
nationalities. Other insurgents who kid
napped two Japanese men and a woman said
Saturday they would free their captives with
in 24 hours, but they had not been freed by
Sunday evening.
The U.S. military Sunday reported eight
more U.S. soldiers killed in fighting Friday and
Saturday. The deaths brought to 59 the num
ber of American soldiers killed since the new
fronts of violence erupted April 4. Almost 900
Iraqis have been killed in the same period. At
least 661 U.S. soldiers have died in Iraq since
the war began in March 2003.
“We don’t see it as a necessary requirement
that any military action has to occur in Najaf,”
Brig. Gen. Mark Kimmitt told reporters.
U.S. troops retook the city of Kut from al-
EASTER FUN
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Lucy Marr, 7, participates in her first Easter Egg Hunt
at the Horace Williams House on Saturday morn
ing. The Horace Williams House has been hosting
the annual event at its current location since 2001. The
games include egg races, spelling games, and guessing the
number. Each child was limited to bringing 10 eggs home.
INSIDE
STRONG FINISH
Play Makers caps a mixed season with an
excellent staging of "Luminosity"PAGE 3
Sadr followers in the past three days, in the
first major foray in months by the U.S. mili
tary into southern Iraq, where U.S. allies have
security duties.
But military action to retake the other
cities could require fighting near some of
Shiite Islam’s holiest shrines, raising the pos
sibility of inflaming Shiite anger at the U.S.-
led occupation. “There are many ways for the
town of Najaf to come back under legitimate
control of the Iraqi government, coalition
provisions authority and that don’t involve
any fighting at all,” Kimmitt said.
U.S.-allied Iraqi leaders increasingly have
expressed anger at the bloodshed in Iraq dur
ing the past week, saying the military has
used excessive force.
More than one-third of the city’s 200,000
residents fled during the lull, Marines said.
Fallujah hospital’s al-Issawi said the number
of Iraqi dead in the city likely was higher than
the 600 recorded at the hospital and four
main clinics in the city.
“We have reports of an unknown number
of dead being buried in people’s homes with
out coming to the clinics,” he said.
Bodies were being buried at two soccer
fields. At one of the fields, dubbed the
“Graveyard of the Martyrs” by residents, an
AP reporter saw rows of freshly dug graves
SEE IRAQ, PAGE 4
86th Congress fills
leadership positions
BY JOSEPH R. SCHWARTZ
ASSISTANT UNIVERSITY EDITOR
The newly elected speaker and
speaker pro tempore of the 86th
Student Congress said they hope
to implement several changes to
foster increased participation and
specialization among representa
tives.
Charlie Anderson and Jennifer
Orr were appointed officially as
speaker and speaker pro tempore,
respectively, Wednesday during a
special session of Congress. Both
ran unopposed and were unani
mously elected by Congress mem
bers.
Congress also elected several
other leaders at the session,
including Daneen Furr as Finance
Committee chairwoman, Luke
Farley as Rules and Judiciary
Committee chairman, Matthew
INSIDE
PLAYING AROUND
Two students create a toy to help visually
impaired children better their skills PAGE 3
MONDAY, APRIL 12, 2004
Auditor
requires
bidding
to reopen
UNCfound in violation
of administrative code
BY BROOK R. CORWIN
UNIVERSITY EDITOR
The UNC Department of Athletics was
forced to reopen a bidding process after the
state auditor determined last month that UNC
failed to engage in proper competitive bidding
when hiring a company to pressure wash Kenan
Stadium.
State Auditor Ralph Campbell Jr. informed
Chancellor James Moeser in a March 9 letter,
released Thursday, that UNC was not in com
pliance with the North Carolina Administrative
Code in entering a convenience contract with
a single pressure washing company. The letter
was a response to an allegation made through
the State Auditor’s Hotline.
Moeser responded March 22, one day
before Campbell’s deadline, with a letter say
ing the University would attempt a formal bid
process for the pressure washing services
immediately.
According to the letter, UNC received only
two initial responses to its July 2000 bid to
pressure wash Kenan Stadium. After being
awarded the contract and performing the job
once, the lowest bidder said it was not interest
ed in continuing the work because it lost rev
enue performing the job.
The remaining contractor was then awarded
the work on an “as needed basis,” which
prompted the University to enter into a con-
SEE BID, PAGE 4
Candidate
for VCSA
drops out
BY JOE SAUNDERS
STAFF WRITER
As the last steps are taken in the search for
anew vice chancellor for student affairs, one of
the final candidates for the position has chosen
to drop out of contention.
Craig Ullom, one of the four finalists for the
position, choose to remove himself from con
sideration for personal reasons, said Steve
Matson, chairman of the search committee.
Ullom is associate vice president for campus life
at the University of Central Florida.
Ullom could not be reached for comment for
this story.
The three remaining candidates have been
scheduled for a two-day interview session dur
ing which they will each come to campus to
meet with administrators, faculty and students.
Edward Spencer, assistant vice president for
student affairs at the Virginia Polytechnic
Institute and State University, will be on cam
pus April 13 to 15. George Harpster, vice presi
dent for student affairs at Shippensburg (Penn.)
SEE VCSA, PAGE 4
Mendenhall as Student Affairs
Committee chairman and Parker
Wiseman as Ethics Committee
chairman.
Anderson, who served this year
as speaker pro tempore, said his
new position will allow him to fix
several inefficiencies.
“Number 1, we’re going to try to
kind of rework how Congress is
structured,” he said.
Central to that goal, Anderson
SEE CONGRESS, PAGE 4
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Junior
Charlie
Anderson
was elected
speaker of
Student
Congress on
Wednesday.
    

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