North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 112, ISSUE 34
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Steve Elliott, a University pilot, checks out his plane Thursday night at the Horace Williams Airport after flying University psychologists back from a lecture in Asheville.
UNC UNSURE OF
SATELLITE PLANS
Officials consider implications of Town Council’s airport resolution on Carolina North
BY CHRIS GLAZNER
ASSISTANT CITY EDITOR
University officials reacted with cau
tion to a resolution passed Wednesday
by the Chapel Hill Town Council that
could delay town-gown discussions over
the Carolina North development.
The resolution directs the council and
town staff to “be extremely cautious with
the allocation of town resources toward
the proposed Carolina North project”
until state legislators decide the fate of
the Horace Williams Airport.
The airport lies on the land where
draft plans locate much of the satellite
research campus. The N.C. General
Assembly has mandated that the
University keep the airport open until
Jan. 1,2005.
Council member Cam Hill proposed
the resolution in response to a petition
by Chapel Hill resident Al Burk to keep
the airport open.
“My feeling is we should consider
postponing consideration of Carolina
ACTION THROUGH IMAGES
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Ronald McCoy (left) and Whitney Brooks check out
the “Action through Images” display Thursday at
Triangle Sportsplex in Hillsborough. The show con
tains work shot by Special Olympians under the coaching of
students in Professor Pat Davison’s photojournalism course.
INSIDE
FREQUENT FLYER
UNC students try to charm their way
around the world in 8 hours PAGE 2
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
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AIRPORT HANGING IN BALANCE
North until the issue of the airport is
resolved,” Hill said Wednesday night
while presenting his petition.
Burk, who lives in the Northhaven
neighborhood, which lies adjacent to the
Horace Williams tract, claimed in
February that the airport provides a
buffer between residential areas and
Carolina North.
The legislature appointed a joint leg
islative commission to address the
future of the Horace Williams tract,
including the airport.
The group has not met yet, but mem
bers have said the airport is not guaran
teed to close in 2005.
Jonathan Howes, former mayor of
Chapel Hill and special assistant to
Chancellor James Moeser, attended the
council meeting Wednesday and said
the University does not know what the
next step will be in negotiating Carolina
North with the town.
“It’s really hard to say because it’s not
clear what (the council is) willing to do
INSIDE
PEARLY WHITES
The first UNC School of Dentistry grads
reach their golden anniversary PAGE 3
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as a result of this,” he said. “As far as the
Carolina North project is concerned,
planning for that is moving ahead and
we’re as eager as ever to talk with the
Town Council about it.”
The council was unsure when negoti
ations on the project would begin, but
the University’s presentation of the
plans for formal review had been
expected to come within a few months.
Howes added that as far as he knew,
a planned presentation of Carolina
North second draft plans to the council
still will take place.
He said he would not speculate as to
what will happen if the airport remains
open. “That’s not where we are right
now.”
Existing drafts of Carolina North
require the closing of the airport, said
Mark Crowell, associate vice chancellor
for economic development.
In 2002, Moeser announced that the
airport would close once anew location
was found for the N.C. Area Health
Hate speech tough to define
BY AMY KINGSLEY
STAFF WRITER
Despite the length of the U.S. Code and the
rejuvenation of UNC’s Honor Code, one con
tentious issue has evaded clear definition: hate
speech.
An examination of the term “hate speech,”
which has emerged as a buzzword in the aca
demic freedom debate, reveals a surprising
absence of clear guidelines.
Federal law includes several statutes pertain
ing to civil rights, some of which have been
brought to attention at UNC following a recent
incident in Elyse Crystall’s English 22 class.
The U.S. Department of Education is investi
gating the University for compliance with Title
VI of the Civil Rights Act, which prohibits dis
crimination on the basis of race, color or nation
al origin, and Title IX of the Education
Amendments 0f1972, which prohibits discrim
ination based on sex.
But officials at the Department of Education
said there are no agency guidelines for intimi
dating or harassing speech. Prosecutors might
seek penalty enhancements for felonies moti
vated by race, religion, gender, creed and sexu-
SEE HATE SPEECH, PAGE 4
Education Centers program, which flies
physicians around the state.
The airport serves more than 1,000
AHEC flights and a few dozen jet land
ings each year.
Thomas Bacon, AHEC director, said
his organization would be involved with
talks about the airport’s future.
“Our position is that we simply need
a place to fly them that is convenient for
our faculty,” he said. “The airport does
n’t belong to AHEC. We simply use the
airport.”
Bacon said Chapel Hill is a more con
venient location than Raleigh-Durham
International Airport, but AHEC will
take no side in discussions.
Roger Perry, member of the UNC
Board of Trustees and of the Carolina
North Executive Committee, declined to
comment until the board considered the
implications of the resolution.
Contact the City Editor
at citydesk@unc.edu.
TAs get tips to handle debates
BY NORA WARREN
STAFF WRITER
Recent academic freedom debates have put
teaching assistants on edge, said Dan
Herman, former president of the Graduate
and Professional Student Federation.
Instructors are seeking to understand eth
ical teaching practices and to learn better the
boundaries of free speech in the classroom, he
said.
The Center for Teaching and Learning,
with inputifrom the GPSF, is expanding the
curriculum of its summer training session.
The training will focus on ethical issues in
teaching, including how to discuss contro
versial issues and facilitate student interac
tion without stifling any one viewpoint.
Herman said the increased training might
help take pressure off TAs who are afraid of
crossing ethical boundaries.
“They don’t want to stay away from
addressing certain educational topics,” he
said. “They would like to have a better skill set
to handle these issues.”
SPORTS
THROWING HEAT
North Carolina pitcher Alison Yin strikes out 10
as the Tar Heels sweep UNC-Greensboro PAGE 6
FRIDAY, APRIL 16, 2004
Democrats
will hold
caucuses
Saturday
State primary modified
because of redistricting
BY SARAH RABIL
STAFF WRITER
Although the N.C. Democratic Party will not
be able to hold presidential primaries because of
delayed redistricting by the N.C. General
Assembly, registered Democrats can vote in
county caucuses Saturday to indicate their pres
idential candidate preference.
In Orange County, registered Democrats can
vote between 8 a.m. and noon Saturday at either
the Chapel Hill Town Hall on North Columbia
Street or at the Orange County Courthouse in
Hillsborough.
Registered North Carolina Democrats can
vote at any polling place in the state, regardless
of whether it is their registered voting district.
UNC Young Democrats will be offering a shut
tle for students to the polling place leaving the
North Campus ATMs at 10 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and
11 a.m. The shuttles will return students to cam
pus after they have voted.
The presidential candidates appearing on the
Democratic caucus ballot will be former Vermont
Gov. Howard Dean, U.S. Sens. John Edwards
and John Kerry, U.S. Rep. Dennis Kucinich and
the Rev. A1 Sharpton.
In response to the General Assembly’s redis
tricting postponement, the state’s primaries
were delayed by the state Board of Elections
SEE CAUCUS, PAGE 4
Fees facilitate
student ASG
involvement
BY LAURA YOUNGS
ASSISTANT STATE & NATIONAL EDITOR
The UNC-system Association of Student
Governments aims to be an advocate for students
across the state, but that hasn’t always been easy.
For the student organization representing the
16 N.C. public universities,
the uphill battle of trying to
reach out to all students is
starting to get a little less dif
ficult.
On Saturday, the ASG will
begin the process of electing
members to its top posts.
It will be the third elec-
Passing the
TORCH
A three-part
series examining
the effectiveness
of the ASG
Today:
Turning a Corner
tion after the Board of Governors unanimously
approved a $1 student fee to go toward the ASG,
granting the organization as much as $165,000
per year.
With a budget so substantial, ASG leaders
past and present say a lot has changed.
“Without the fee, students wanted to partici
pate but they didn’t have the necessary means,”
former ASG President Andrew Payne said.
SEE ASG, PAGE 4
Larry Rowan, director of the center, said
that faculty members at the center have been
working on expanding training sessions for a
couple of years.
But the recent focus on academic freedom,
following an e-mail sent by English lecturer
Elyse Crystall to her class publicly chastising
a student for anti-homosexual comments, has
TAs questioning how they handle the discus
sion of controversial issues in the classroom.
“What you want undergraduate students to
be able to do is to think developmentally,” said
Donna Bailey, director of the Teaching
Assistant Development program.
It is important for students to be able to
state their different viewpoints while still
maintaining an appreciation for other opin
ions, she said.
Faculty Council Chairwoman Judith
Wegner said one strategy for identifying the
best ways to prepare for leading student dis
cussion is to use scenario teaching.
SEE TA TRAINING, PAGE 4
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