North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 112, ISSUE 44
Jablonski picked to run student affairs
FORMER DEAN AT BROWN
NAMED VICE CHANCELLOR
BY JENN KAWKA
STAFF WRITER
UNC ended its seven-month
search for anew vice chancellor for
student affairs May 27 with the
appointment of Margaret
Jablonski.
“I’m very excited about joining
the team at Carolina and very
impressed by the faculty, staff and
BOTOKs
Morrison
changes
BY BRIAN HUDSON
UNIVERSITY EDITOR
The UNC Board of Trustees decided May 27 to
allocate several million dollars to the renovation and
restoration of the University’s two South Campus
high-rise residence halls.
The first step of the approved renovation the
nearly S2O million renovation of Morrison Residence
Hall would include the installation of fire safety
equipment, indoor air quality and air conditioning
equipment and the restoration of rooms and bath
rooms.
Included in the 2-year Morrison renovation will be
an “enhanced suite” project, where in about one
third of suites —one room will be transformed into a
common space. The renovations will begin next sum
mer, with the renovation of Hinton James Residence
Hall set to commence sometime after their completion.
Trustees decided against a $5.4 million option to
restore the brick exterior of Morrison. BOT members
said they did not want to devote money to a building
that could face demolition in the next couple of
decades.
“If it’s this board’s thought to say keep them, I
value them. My concern is if they’re obsolete,” said
Trustee Bob Winston during the meeting. “I would
n’t spend extra dollars to put lipstick on the pig.”
Dean Bresciani, interim vice chancellor for student
affairs, said the decision was in students’ best interests.
“We have been considering what we wanted to do
with Morrison... for a number of years now, and it
was a pretty steadied decision that we wanted to ren
ovate Morrison,” he said. “They basically approved all
the important aspects (of renovation).”
The fate of the South Campus residence halls has
been discussed by the trustees during their last sev
eral meetings, but they had not been able to come to
a consensus until now.
BOT Chairman Richard “Stick” Williams said dur
ing last week’s meeting that in the interest of timeli
ness, a decision was necessary as soon as possible.
“We’re going to have to make some kind of deci
sion,” he said. “So we’re not faced with Odum Village.”
During the renovation of Morrison, students will
be relocated to the Odum Village, the married and
family housing complex south of Manning Drive,
which is scheduled for demolition in 2009 to make
way for other residential facilities.
That project’s schedule also influenced the trustees
choice to only renovate Morrison and Hinton James,
as the other plans would have delayed the Odum
Village project between 2 and 5 years.
SEE MORRISON, PAGE 5
Street name to come to vote
Committee nixes
dedication idea
BY JOSEPH R. SCHWARTZ
CITY EDITOR
Much to the distaste of more
than 700 citizens who signed a
petition to save Airport Road, it
appears that its days are numbered.
After a Chapel Hill Town
Council meeting last week that
saw a plethora of dissenters and
supporters of the proposal to
rename Airport Road in honor of
Martin Luther King Jr., the coun
cil committee in charge of the plan
is unwavering in their recommen
dation to change the road.
Those opposing the change had
a.glimmer of hope after Council
rriember Edith Wiggins, who
heads the renaming committee,
brought forward an idea to dedi
cate the road instead of renaming
it, but it was quickly dashed after a
brief 35-minute meeting.
Council member Sally Greene,
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Serving the students and the University community since 1893
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students,” Jablonski said.
Jablonski, dean for campus life
at Brown University since 2001,
will begin her new role with the
University Aug. 19-
“I’m absolutely delighted,” said
Steve Matson, chairman of the
VCSA search committee. “She was
an outstanding candidate for the
position, and I’m thrilled she
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Taking advantage of the clear, balmy
Memorial Day weather, a submerged
Stephen Quinlen (left) watches on as
Mitchell Ford prepares to make a sizeable splash
at the Meadowmont Swim Club in Chapel Hill.
This year’s Memorial Day festivities were the
third annual to be held at the 3 l/2-year-old
DTH/GILLIAN BOLSOVER
Town Council menbers Sally Greene (right) and Edith Wiggins consider
the proposal to rename Airport Road at a committee meeting Tuesday.
who serves on the committee, pro
vided compelling evidence that a
dedication would go unnoticed.
“The (National Association for
the Advancement of Colored
People) has heard the option of
dedication and feels strongly that
dedication is not powerful
WEEKLY SUMMER ISSUE
www.dailytarheel •Com
accepted (it).”
As senior student affairs leader
and head of the division of student
affairs, Jablonski will oversee pro
grams for student learning and
student services.
Programs in the division include
the Campus Y, leadership develop
ment, Student Union, Greek
affairs, new student programs,
dean of students and career servic
es, among others.
“She brings a range of different
experiences from the world of stu
dent affairs to UNC... experience
enough,” she said. “Over time a
name means something, and a
dedication can lose its meaning.”
The 10 citizens who encircled
the committee members saw the
group draft four separate resolu-
SEE COMPROMISE, PAGE 5
TOP NEWS
RACE TO SAVE A SYMBOL
A campus landmark continues to
search for renovation funds. PAGE 3
NewVCSA
Margaret
Jablonksi
was the dean
for campus
life at Brown
University.
in public and private schools and
schools of stellar reputations,”
Matson said.
Prior to working at Brown,
Jablonski served as associate vice
chancellor for student affairs at the
MEMORIAL DAY
mixed-use development. Meadowmont Swim
Club’s manager, Jennifer Wichowski, said
approximately 425 people attended Monday
afternoon’s event, which included a live band and
a cookout. It was similar to many other gather
ings in the area celebrating the memory of
American troops who died in the nation’s service.
Task force endorses
ads at sports venues
High scholarship costs drive choice
BY BRIAN HUDSON
UNIVERSITY EDITOR
The University’s Task Force on
Signage in Athletic Facilities
endorsed the idea of corporate
advertising in UNC sports ven
ues during their final meeting
May 27.
The recommendation will now
go before Chancellor James
Moeser and the UNC Board of
Trustees. If approved, it could
result in the formation of anoth
er committee to determine how
the revenue would be distrib
uted.
In response to the “substantial
need for the Department of
Athletics to meet rising scholar
ship costs, facility demands and
sport-by-sport operating budget
requirements,” the resolution
recommends that the University
INSIDE
THE ICE MOVIE COMETH
The climate gets killer 'Tomorrow/
with mammoth problems. PAGE 9
University of Connecticut and
associate dean for undergraduate
education and student affairs at
the Massachusetts Institute of
Technology.
She has also worked in various
student leadership development
positions at Worchester
Polytechnic Institute, Boston
University and the University of
Massachusetts-Amherst.
Jablonski has an excellent record
of integrating student affairs with
academic affairs and including the
role of students and faculty in that
DTH/MIKE GIBSON
“explore signage and other relat
ed partnerships, for athletic ven
ues.”
The task force also included
several guidelines for signage to
ensure it had a limited and taste
ful effect on UNC athletics.
“Signage or partnerships
should only be introduced in a
limited and tasteful way, with a
small number of companies that
have strong integrity and nation
al impact,” the resolution stated.
The task force also recom
mended that the signage have
“significant financial impact
within the athletic department;
and the partnerships protect ...
the environment and tradition of
the institution.”
UNC Athletics Director Dick
SEE SIGNAGE, PAGE 5
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TODAY Sunny, High 84, Low 62 /,
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SATURDAY Isolated T-Storms, High 84, Low 65
THURSDAY, JUNE 3, 2004
integration, Matson said.
“She will be able to mend some
riffs between academic affairs and
student affairs,” he said.
Sue Kitchen vacated the posi
tion in the spring of 2002, and
Dean Bresciani has been serving as
interim vice chancellor since that
time. Bresciani will become the
vice president for student affairs at
Texas A&M University June 28.
“I think they made an excellent
recommendation,” Bresciani said.
SEE VCSA, PAGE 5
House
delays
budget
rollout
University likely
to see fewer cuts
BY CHRIS COLETTA
STATE & NATIONAL EDITOR
The N.C. House again delayed
the unfolding of its spending plans
Tuesday, but the chamber’s leaders
said the UNC system will be
spared the brunt of extra budget
cuts outlined in the bill’s first draft.
Originally, the House was
scheduled to consider the budget
at the end of last week. That plan
included $44 million in cuts to
UNC-system schools on top of
reductions called for in Gov. Mike
Easley’s spending proposal.
But an outcry of concern from
state officials and rank-and-file
lawmakers in both the House and
Senate pushed back the budget’s
release, first to Tuesday and now to
the beginning of next week —and
universities will be among the ben
eficiaries of the delay.
“We’re going to be restoring
some cuts that we made on the
first pass,” said House Co-speaker
Jim Black, D-Mecklenburg.
“(Budget writers) needed more
time, and so do we.”
Both Black and Co-speaker
Richard Morgan, R-Moore, would
not say exactly how much money
they planned to restore to the
state’s 16 public universities or
where the cash for the increases
would come from.
Numbers, however, were in
place Tuesday, given to budget
writers behind closed doors. Rep.
Jim Crawford, a Granville County
Democrat who serves as co-chair
man of the House Appropriations
Committee, said after the meeting
that the figures would be available
later in the week.
“Budgets are always a work in
progress,” Morgan said in
explaining the delay.
But any news was likely good
news for system officials, whose
schools have been hit hard by cuts
in recent years.
UNC-Chapel Hill Provost
Robert Shelton told The Daily Tar
Heel last week that if the gover
nor’s proposed cuts of 1.7 percent
were implemented, the University
might be forced to cut teaching
assistant and faculty positions.
Also last week, UNC-system
President Molly Broad circulated
a memo asking campus leaders to
petition budget writers to give the
system as much money as possible.
“It is imperative that House
budget leaders hear from you
now,” the memo states.
Broad’s actions came in the
shadow of the House’s original
proposal, which among other
things specified a cut of $5 mil
lion earmarked specifically
toward increasing class sizes and
cuts of S2O million that would be
determined by universities.
Such cuts would run counter to
the goals of campus-based tuition
SEE BUDGET CUTS, PAGE 5
    

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