North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 112, ISSUE 55
Downtown plaza might face makeover
CAT’S CRADLE, OTHER BUSINESSES WOULD STAY AT LOCATION
■Y SHANNAN BOWEN
ASSISTANT CITY EDITOR
The plan has not yet been
released to the public, but people
involved with the project say the
proposed new look for Carrboro’s
main retail center could be a prom
ising upgrade.
An early concept plan involves
the redevelopment of the property
at 300 E. Main St by tearing down
the existing one-story structure
that contains Cat’s Cradle and the
Arts Center and rebuilding units as
high as five stories.
■ |: —■— m m —^
DTH/IAURA MORTON
Tremayne Manson, president of the Alpha lota Omega board of directors and founder of the fraternity, speaks at a press conference in the Pit on Wednesday
afternoon. The Alliance Defense Fund filed suit against the University on behalf of the Christian fraternity, which was denied recognition by the University.
GROUP FILES SUIT
AGAINST UNIVERSITY
BY EMILY STEEL
UNIVERSITY EDITOR
All eyes were on members of the Alpha lota
Omega fraternity Wednesday afternoon as they
stood in the middle of the Pit amidst a mass of
reporters and swarms of students —and formally
declared the federal lawsuit they have filed against
the University.
The all-male Christian fraternity is fighting to
reinstate its official University recognition, which
was revoked last year after members refused to sign
a nondiscrimination policy required of all campus
organizations.
Trevor Hamm, Carlon Myrick and Jonathan
Park the three members of die all-male Christian
fraternity came out of the shadows in which they
have been hiding since their situation began to
ANALYSIS
Co-speakership reveals deep divisions
BY KAVITA PILLAI
ASSISTANT STATE & NATIONAL EDITOR
After the 2002 elections, North
Carolina faced a unique situation
in the N.C. House.
The races divided the chamber's
120 seats evenly among Democrats
and Republicans, leaving the
speaker position up for grabs.
Following a week of fighting, the
landmark decision to form a co
speakership with Rep. Jim Black,
D-Mecklenburg, and Rep. Richard
Morgan, R-Moore, was made.
Now, two years later, the fate of
bipartisan leadership is indefinite
as politicians and pundits examine
u
msim
STRIKE
The unrenovated Student Union's Underground
reopened in July, but its future is uncertain PAGE 2
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
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Though it hasn’t been approved
or formally presented to town
boards, the plan features a pedes
trian-accessible multiuse center
that includes areas for retail, resi
dential property and outdoor per
formances.
Laura Van Sant, a partner in
Main Street Properties of Chapel
Hill, LLC, which owns the center,
said the partners will unveil the
conceptual design to the public
at a Sept. 13 public forum at the
Carrboro Century Center.
Van Sant said she received posi
make headlines nationwide.
“Stated frankly, it is in no shape or form
the intention of Alpha lota Omega to be arbitrarily
‘shaking the waters’ as some might perceive it to
be,” Hamm read from a prepared statement.
“Attempts to reach an understanding with the
University have failed; therefore, today, we are ask
ing a federal judge to allow us to continue our orga
nization’s mission and share our faith with our fel
low students as an official student organization.”
Hamm stood in front of a support network of
the fraternity’s board of directors and lawyers from
Alliance Defense Fund, an Arizona-based religious
liberties group that has taken on the AlO’s fight for
recognition.
“We are a fraternity, a Christian fraternity,” said
Tremayne Manson, president of AlO’s board of
the arrangement’s effectiveness.
Some say the co-speakership
improved the legislative process,
while others assert that it was more
divisive than unifying, especially
within the Republican Party.
Supporters of the arrangement
point to less bickering between
parties as evidence of success.
“I hope people wi11... try to work
together, rather than get bogged
down in partisan politics," said
Black, who has served as speaker
since 1999-
The move toward a co-speaker
ship was spearheaded by a hand
ful of Republicans who broke with
tive responses from the tenants of
the center and surrounding busi
nesses after they caught an early
glimpse of the project.
Jon Wilner, executive director
of the Arts Center, said his business
is planning to be part of the new
structure when it is complete.
“I’m extremely impressed so far,”
Wilner said.
The project would not force ten
ants to leave the location because
the rebuilding would be done in
phases, allowing businesses to
move into new locations before
CAMPUS CONFLICT
their party to vote for the alliance.
More conservative Republicans
considered the move a betrayal,
and Morgan has been feeling the
heat ever since.
“We had a 60-60 split, but we
could have conceivably had a single
Republican speaker,” said Rep. John
Rhodes, R-Mecklenburg. “Morgan
supported the Democrats in basi
cally cutting any deal he could to
share the tide of co-speaker.”
Ferrel Guillory, director of UNC’s
Program on Southern Politics,
Media and Public Life, said the
co-speakership had both strengths
and weaknesses and revealed prob
m
their old ones are tom down, Van
Sant said.
“If people close up they will
move away or go out of business,”
she said.
The retail center, which is now
55,000 square feet, would expand
to 400,000 square feet with the
additional stories.
If approved, this project could
be the first to be built under anew
Carrboro ordinance enacted last
summer that allows buildings in
certain zones to reach four or five
stories.
directors, after the press conference. “Every, every,
every fraternity has always had standards on which
they stipulate membership.”
The lawsuit, which was filed in the U.S. District
Court in Greensboro on Wednesday, argues that
the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution
guarantees the fraternity the right to discriminate
while retaining official UNC recognition.
University officials have held that they must
balance the rights of equal protection, guaranteed
by the Fourteenth Amendment, and those of free
speech guaranteed by the First Amendment.
The University now has 20 days to respond to
the lawsuit.
All student organizations seeking official UNC
SEE LAWSUIT, PAGE 4
lems within the GOP.
“Having a co-speakership was
an unusual and inherently fragile
thing,” he said. “It exposed a frac
ture in the Republican Party.”
Rep. Wilma Sherrill, R-
Buncombe, said while she thinks
the co-speakership was successful,
some Republicans refused to work
within the new system.
“They just threw out the whole
two years of the session and
refused to work with Speaker
Morgan and Speaker Black,” she
said. “And they did everything
SEE MORGAN, PAGE 4
DOWN AND DIRTY
The women's field hockey team seeks to
catapult past prior successes PAGE 9
Trish McGuire, town planning
administrator, said the retail loca
tion is zoned so that structures can
be four stories tall or five stories
if buildings are set back 50 feet
from the street
Each unit on the site must have
a conditional-use permit if the
building is higher than two stories,
McGuire said.
Van Sant said Main Street
Properties will apply for condition
al-use permits next year and, if all
is approved, will begin construction
within three to five years.
The centerpiece of the proj
ect is a large pedestrian plaza cut
diagonally through the site, where
Congress
kicks off
analysis
of Code
Committee meeting is
first of many on issue
BY JOE SAUNDERS
STAFF WRITER
While this year's student elections still are a
semester away, members of Student Congress
are taking action now to avoid controversy and
to make the Student Code less open to inter
pretation.
Congress began the long and complicated
process of significantly revising the Code dur
ing the first meeting of the Rules and Judiciary
Committee on Tuesday evening.
While committee members did not vote on
any drastic changes to the Code, the review
represents the beginning of a series of major
revisions. Dining die year, student government
will revise the document, which has not been
altered for the past ten years.
The recommendations made Ihesday will
go before the entire body of Student Congress
during its meeting next week.
SEE STUDENT CODE, PAGE 4
DJ to focus on
‘hetero pride’
during parade
BY RYAN C. TUCK
CITY EDITOR
The parade on Franklin Street Saturday
morning will have all the elements of a typi
cal parade: signs, T-shirts, police escorts and a
large gathering of people.
But what the people are celebrating might
be less than orthodox.
Bob Dumas, a notoriously controversial disc
jockey from radio station WDCG, or 105.1 FM,
will be leading a march down Franklin Street
on Saturday that he is calling his “Celebrating
Heterosexuality” pride parade.
At 10:45 a.m., Dumas and his fellow “flam
ing heterosexuals” will march down the east
bound lanes of Franklin Street.
It is slated to begin at the Jiffy Lube at 607
SEE PARADE, PAGE 4
- s ' ' • \
DTH FILE PHOTO
N.C. House Co-Speaker Richard Morgan, R-Moore, spent the last legislative
session in an alliance with Jim Black, a Mecklenburg County Democrat.
TODAY Partly cloudy, H 84, L 65
FRIDAY Mostly cloudy, H 85, L 67
SATURDAY Partly cloudy, H 85, L 68
THURSDAY, AUGUST 26, 2004
a parking lot now sits.
The parking lot would be cov
ered by the plaza, and a parking
deck would be built behind the
building where Cat’s Cradle now
sits.
“We hope to have distinctive
sizes,” Van Sant said. “So, it will
look like an urban development,
not one big streetscape plopped
down there.”
Alderman Diana McDufiee said
the project’s proposed plans seem
appropriate for die town.
“It’s really exciting, creative and
innovating,” she said.
SEE PLAZA, PAGE 4
j n
    

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