North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 112, ISSUE 68
Congress OKs funds for Keyes
ILLINOIS SENATE CANDIDATE
TO SPEAK ON CAMPUS NOV. 10
BY UZZIE STEWART
STAFF WRITER
Despite student concerns
regarding the appropriation of
$7,000 in student fees to bring
Alan Keyes to the University,
Student Congress approved fund
ing for the event Tuesday night.
Keyes —a former Republican
Community,
shelter group
kick off talks
Shelter location remains hot topic
BY MEREDITH LEE MILLER
ASSISTANT CITY EDITOR
Two worlds collided Tuesday.
After weeks of protests, the
residents of the Pine Knolls
community and representatives
of the Inter-Faith Council sat
down to discuss potential plans
for a homeless shelter on Merritt
Mill Road.
The IFC continues to say that
its men’s shelter’s current loca
tion at 100 W. Rosemary St. is
not an adequate facility in the
long run.
In August, the group
announced that it was looking
at a tract of land on Merritt Mill
Road as a possible future site for
its homeless shelter.
The IFC said it has the
option to purchase the proper
ty if the group decides it wants
to have the shelter on Merritt
Mill Road.
But some residents of the
Pine Knolls neighborhood are
not happy about the possibility
of a shelter in their area.
In late August, the residents
sent a letter to Chris Moran,
executive director of the shel
ter, stating that a homeless
shelter does not belong in their
County obtains grant
to aid minority health
BY RYAN C. TUCK
CITY EDITOR
According to the N.C. Latino
Health Task Force, North Carolina
has the fastest growing Latino
population in the country.
The Latino population grew
394 percent from 1990 to 2000
and accounts for about 4.7 percent
of the state’s total population.
Last Friday, the N.C.
Commission on Volunteerism &
Community Service took steps
toward addressing that growth.
The commission, based out of
Gov. Mike Easley’s office, awarded
agrant of $258,956 to 10 counties,
including Orange County. The
grant is aimed toward improving
minority health issues.
The grant is being facilitated
through the N.C. Office ofMinority
Health and Health Disparities,
which aims to eliminate health
care discrepancies among all
racial and ethnic minorities.
“Local agencies have said
that minority health services
are important to their commu
nities,” said Leslie Brown, health
disparities liaison for the state
office. “We truly need to respond
to those needs.”
The funds from the grant will
be used in the county to place a
member of national service orga
nization AmeriCorps at Piedmont
Health Services in Carrboro.
Moses Carey, an Orange
County commissioner and execu
tive director of Piedmont, said the
organization has seen a significant
change in the demographics of its
clientele in the last decade.
Carey said about 70 percent
of the patients at Piedmont’s
Carrboro Community Health
INSIDE
GOODBYE, ATHENS
UNC students visit Beijing to spruce up the
city's 2008 Summer Olympics plans PAGE 2
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
@lir Satin Sar Mrrl
presidential candidate who is seek
ing a Senate seat in Illinois is
slated to speak in the law school
rotunda Nov. 10. Two overflow
rooms will be available to accom
modate the expected crowd.
In a roll-call vote, 16 Congress
members approved the bill, nine
rejected the bill and five abstained
neighborhood.
The letter stated the resi
dents’ belief that a homeless
shelter would bring more
crime to the area and would be
a danger to children and senior
citizens.
Residents also requested to
meet with Moran.
Moran, along with IFC
President Natalie Ammarell,
met Tuesday afternoon with
a few members of the com
munity at IFC’s center for
its Home Start program on
Homestead Road.
Ammarell said the meeting
was an informal way to share
ideas. “We started a good dia
logue,” she said.
The IFC plans to meet with
the residents in the future,
though no date has been set,
Ammarell said.
“This was not a date-setting
meeting,” she said. “We tried to
see what the community had to
say and see what their concerns
were.”
The IFC also had its chance
to talk with the citizens about
future plans for the shelter,
SEE PINE KNOLLS, PAGE 5
“We’ve been
running ... with
volunteers. We
need these
persons out there
GABRIELA ZABALA, WORKER
Center are Latino. It is estimated
that 13 percent of the town’s total
population is Latino or Hispanic.
“We have to respond to our
population change,” Carey
said, adding that about half of
Carrboro’s community center
employees now speak Spanish.
Carey said the AmeriCorps
worker will help the staff with the
change in its clientele.
The state grant also will pro
vide AmeriCorps workers to
assist in health care service pro
grams dealing with teenage drug
abuse, diabetes, HIV-AIDS and
Native American health care.
Gabriela Zabala, chairwoman
of the Latino Health Task Force,
said the grant will provide two
AmeriCorps workers to the task
force to help it better account for
the growing Latino population.
“We’ve been running since
1995 with volunteers,” Zabala
said. “We need these persons out
there getting the data.”
According to the Latino task
force’s report on health insur
ance and worker’s compensa
tion, 54 percent of all North
Carolina Latinos are uninsured.
That number jumps to more
SEE GRANT, PAGE 5
INSIDE
PEACE, LOVE AND UNDERSTANDING
Speakers focus on relations of Islamic,
Western worlds at discussion PAGE 2
www.dtlionline.Goin
from voting.
Numerous students sent e
mails to Congress officials and
representatives during the past
week, citing concerns about Keyes’
views and the use of student fees,
to foot the bill for his speech.
Congress members said stu
dents’ main concerns stemmed
from the reaction to last year’s
Ann Coulter speech, which was
sponsored by the UNC Federalist
Society and partially funded by
$6,747.50 in student fees.
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Chancellor James Moeser waits to
speak before ceremoniously revealing
the new lighting of the Morehead-
Patterson Bell Tower on Tuesday night.
Dozens of students, including members of
the Order of the Bell Tower, looked on as
four halogen lights illuminated the tower.
Western N.C. could face Ivan’s wrath
FIVE-DAY PROJECTED PATH FOR IVAN
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When the Federalist Society
brought the proposal for Coulter’s
speech before Congress, mem
bers of the society noted Coulter’s
expertise in federalist issues as the
main reason to bring her to the
University.
But some students thought
that Coulter attacked liberal ide
als instead of addressing federalist
issues pertinent to the organiza
tion, Congress members said.
Before Tuesday’s meeting,
Finance Committee Chairwoman'
LET THERE BE LIGHT
Moeser, who spoke about the tower’s history,
said he has wanted to light the Bell Tower
since he became the University’s chancellor
in 2000. After the tower was lit, Master Bell
Ringer Travis Kephart played the University’s
alma mater on the tower’s bells. For the
complete article, open the paper to page 2.
SPORTS
A SUDDEN BLOW
Senior offensive tackle Skip Seagraves likely
will miss the rest of the football season PAGE 4
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2004
Daneen Furr anticipated debate
regarding the nature of Keyes’
talk.
In a Sept. 7 letter to the Finance
Committee requesting student fees
to fund the event, the Federalist
Society stated that Keyes would
not only address issues such as
federalism and judicial activism
but also touch on the definition of
marriage and race relations.
“I believe this event will gamer
SEE CONGRESS, PAGE 5
DTH/LAURA MORTON
BY LAURA YOUNGS
SENIOR WRITER
With yet another storm headed
for the state, experts say the amount
of rain expected from Hurricane
Ivan could be costly to North
Carolina’s agriculture industry.
“Any additional rain will only
make the conditions worse,” said
John Quagliariello, a meteorologist
with the National Weather Service
in Wilmington, on the flooding situ
ations in the state.
The effects of the storm might be
felt as early as Friday, but Quagliariello
said the real impact is expected to
come during the weekend.
Ivan is predicted to reach the Gulf
Coast on Thursday morning and, by
Sunday, stall over North Carolina
possibly dumping as many as 9
inches of rain on the western half of
the state and as many as 4 inches on
the eastern half, Quagliariello said.
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TODAY Mostly cloudy, H 81, L 67
THURSDAY P.M. Showers, H 82, L 68
FRIDAY T-Storms, H 79, L 67
School
weighs
crucial
issues
UNCfinds itself
in balancing act
BY EMMA BURGIN
STATE & NATIONAL EDITOR
As the line continues to blur
between public and private institu
tions, schools such as UNC strive to
maintain their mission to the states
they vow to serve.
The move toward privatization
among public institutions advanced
Friday, as a trio of Virginia public
universities announced their plan
to gain more autonomy from the
state.
The University of Virginia, the
College of William & Mary and
Virginia Polytechnic Institute
and State University revealed
their plan to become the first
chartered universities in their
15-school system.
The shift is an effort to close the
schools’ budget shortfalls during
the next five years.
All three schools said Friday that
they’d be willing to forgo a 10 per
cent funding increase each year in
exchange for more independence.
The schools also would be willing
to increase their enrollment by a
total 0f2,450.
“These public universities are
starting to become more like pri
vate universities,” said UNC Provost
Robert Shelton.
“The whole issue of compe
tition for faculty, students and
managing your budgets are very
similar between top publics and
top privates.”
The main reason public universi
ties are looking inward for support
is state budget crises.
“The global factors here are sim
ply that for... public research uni
versities, the state is contributing
less and less over the years,” Shelton
said.
But the difference between UNC
and UVa. is that the latter institu
tion receives a lower percentage
of its budget from the state and a
higher percentage of revenue from
tuition.
After budget cuts were factored
into the state’s appropriations
bill this summer, 21 percent of
UNC’s revenue came from North
Carolina.
While Shelton said UNC will
not be initiating any big push
for autonomy in the near future,
he said the school could benefit
from more flexibility in construc
tion, health plans and personnel
appointments.
“We are continuing to work with
the legislature to try and gain more
flexibility in how we do business
while maintaining accountability
with taxpayers.”
SEE VIRGINIA, PAGE 5
Ivan dropped to a Category 4 storm
TUesday with sustained winds of 140
mph, but Quagliariello said the storm
is not any less dangerous.
For a state coming out of a wet
summer and multiple storms,
including the remnants of
Hurricanes Charley and Frances,
more rain could result in severe
flooding. “The grounds haven’t had
any time to dry out, so when you add
this much more water, they don’t have
anywhere to go,” Quagliariello said.
Flooding caused by Ffrmces already
has left a great deal of destruction.
Gov. Mike Easley declared a state of
emergency last week, resulting in 15
counties in western North Carolina
receiving expedited funds to assist
with aid efforts, according to a press
release from the governor’s office.
Frances, which dropped as many
SEE IVAN, PAGE 5
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