North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 112, ISSUE 113
Moeser’s review kicks off
BEHIND CLOSED DOORS, BOT
TAKES LOOK AT LEADERSHIP
BY EMILY STEEL
UNIVERSITY EDITOR
Behind the closed doors of
the Chancellor Ballroom in the
Carolina Inn, members of UNC’s
governing board spent several
hours analyzing the leadership of
the University.
All the while, Chancellor James
Moeser lingered outside the room
and mingled with members of his
cabinet.
Now in his fifth year at the
University, Moeser is under review
Changes
focus on
a global
outlook
New curriculum
to look outward
BY CHARLOTTE MURPHY
STAFF WRITER
During Commencement cer
emonies in 2010, the typical
University student will walk
across the stage having completed
an in-depth study of global issues,
participated in a videoconference
with students in Mexico and
studied abroad for at least one
semester.
UNC will implement anew
curriculum in fall 2006, and
University officials are seeking to
internationalize the experience
students gain from their college
education.
“We’ve got a world that’s con
nected through transnational
and cultural
exchanges,”
said Bobbi
Owen, senior
associate
dean for
undergradu
ate educa-
The fifth part of a
five-part series exam
ining the University's
mission to become a
leading international
institution.
tion.
“Global citizenship is especially
important, and by implementing
the new curriculum, I think that
we’re acknowledging that the
world is changing.”
The new curriculum will fea
ture some of the same General
College requirements, renamed
Foundations and Approaches.
But it also incorporates anew
area, Connections, in which stu
dents will apply skills and knowl
edge to global situations and per
spectives.
To fulfill this requirement, stu
dents will take perspective cours
es in the areas of Experiential
Education, the North Atlantic
World and Global Issues.
1 Study abroad experiences
also can fulfill the Experiential
Educational requirement.
Owen said the addition will
provide more incentives for stu
dents to study abroad and to gain
exposure to other cultures.
“We are very concerned with
giving students international
experience of some kind, whether
it’s through going abroad or learn
ing about other countries here at
UNC,” said Arne Kalleberg, senior
associate dean for the social sci
ences in the College of Arts and
Sciences.
UNC students said they also see
the need for internationalization
of the curriculum.
“Many of us are trying to get
people to realize this campus is
not the entire world,” said Anna
Thompson, founder of Students
United for Darfur Awareness
Now. “Things are happening out
side the United States that are
important.”
Thompson is also a member of
the K-12 International Outreach
Program, which sends students
SEE CURRICULUM, PAGE 4
ONLINE
Dirty Dozen Brass Band to hit UNC
Students to protest military school
Swimmers do well in meet's Ist day
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
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in his tenure as chancellor.
As regulated by University poli
cies, the UNC Board of Trustees
is taking a comprehensive, multi
faceted look at Moeser’s term as
chancellor.
“I’m feeling very good about it
now so far with what I’ve seen,”
Moeser said. “I’m sure we’ll be able
to find out more about it later.”
Moeser’s review process the
exact details of which remain con
fidential is similar to all stan
dard fourth-year comprehensive
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Freshman Lindsey Witmer (left)
and junior Maria Shendrick
participate in a candlelight vigil
Thursday night in the Pit. The vigil was
sponsored by Students United for Darfur
Dole’s quickly rising star hits national stage
Long-time stateswoman shines in role as senator
BY LAURA YOUNGS
SENIOR WRITER
For Elizabeth Dole, the spotlight is noth
ing new.
But after serving under five presidents,
leading the American Red Cross and touring
the country in an unsuccessful presidential
campaign for her husband, Bob, in 1996, she
is moving into the role of North Carolina’s
senior senator.
The Salisbury native has spent only two
years on Capitol Hill, but in that short time,
she has continued to build a strong following
in both the Republican Party and among her
constituency.
And on Wednesday, that support helped
her edge out Minnesota Sen. Norm Coleman
by one vote in the secret ballot for the title
of chairwoman of the National Republican
Senatorial Committee.
With that role comes a great deal of respon
sibility, but also a great deal of influence.
“She’s a rock star,” said Republican Richard
Burr, North Carolina’s pick to fill Democratic
Group considers playground changes
Alaskan drilling prompts fiery debate
For these stories, visit dthonline.com.
www.dthonline.com
Chancellor
James
Moeser
says he feels
good about
the ongoing
evaluation of
his tenure.
performance
reviews of chancellors in
the UNC system.
Trustees have worked to solicit
feedback from faculty, staff, com
munity and alumni representa
tives, along with students.
They also are collecting input
from several groups, including
external communities such as the
FLICKER OF HOPE
Awareness Now, a project of the N.C. Hillel.
Organizers distributed green ribbons
to participants at the vigil and accepted
donations that will support humanitarian
aid workers in the embattled Sudan area.
Sen. John Edwards’ seat when Edwards leaves
office in January.
“She can go anywhere in the country and is
known. She has unbelievably high favorability
among every group of Americans.”
As NRSC chairwoman, Dole’s biggest task
will be fund raising. But she also will look to
expand the Republican majority in the Senate
through the recruitment of new candidates
and the retention of incumbents in the 2006
elections.
“What’s important about the r01e... is that
it has to do with money,” said Ferrel Guillory,
director of UNC’s Program on Southern
Politics, Media and Public Life.
“It takes a lot of money to run for United
States Senate, no matter what state you’re
in.”
Guillory added that such influence over
Republican money is significant. The NRSC
position allows Dole to work closely with
major leaders on re-election strategy and
SEE DOLE, PAGE 4
m
Board of Visitors and the Carolina
First campaign.
The Research Triangle
Institute, an independent, non
profit research corporation, is
compiling the data.
“We are getting a lot of input
around campus,” said Richard
“Stick” Williams, chairman of the
board of trustees. “Now we are in
the process of interpreting all that
and really figuring out what it all
means.”
After trustees complete their
assessment, they will pass it on
to the UNC-system Board of
Governors and the Office of the
SEE REVIEW, PAGE 4
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Sen. Elizabeth Dole, a Republican soon to be North Carolina's senior senator, was
named chairwoman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee on Wednesday.
SPOUTS
FAST BREAK
Tar Heel hoops squad begins a year filled with lofty
expectations in Oakland against Santa Clara PAGE 7
BY THE NUMBERS
EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION
$7.9
MILLION
Projected
scholarship
costs the
foundation
can cover for
2004-2005
$B.l *8.2
MILLION
Projected
athletic
scholarship
costs for the
2004-2005
schoolyear
UNC boosters
face struggles
with funding
BY SARAH RABIL
STAFF WRITER
The Department of Athletics is
bracing for another shortfall in ath
letic scholarship funds this year as
tuition increases continue to out
pace fund raising.
And fund-raising officials pre
dict an even bleaker future.
A private, nonprofit group called
the Educational Foundation has
funded scholarships for UNC ath
letes and raised money for athletic
facility improvements since 1938.
But for the second year in a
row, the foundation, parent orga
nization of the Rams Club, is pro
jecting a shortfall in scholarship
“This is not secret
information that’s being kept
under wraps.” judith wegner, FACULTY CHAIRWOMAN
Panel’s stipends
raise questions
BY DAN GRINDER
STAFF WRITER
Several faculty members have
questioned the legitimacy of a pro
posed program in Western studies
after learning that faculty mem
bers who developed the program
received funding from Art and
John William Pope.
To fund the planning stage of the
project, the Popes donated $25,000
to faculty members who served on
the committee charged with develop
ing a Western studies curriculum.
The Popes’ charitable organiza
tion, the Pope Foundation, is con
sidering donating sl4 million to
UNC to fund the curriculum. But
it has come under fire from faculty
members who say a conservative
think tank it once funded, the Pope
Center for Higher Education Policy,
has been highly critical of UNC.
Members of the faculty learned of
the stipends during a Sept. 28 fac
WEATHER
TODAY Showers, H 69, L 51
SATURDAY P.M. Showers, H 72, L 54
SUNDAY Showers, H 71, L 54
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2004
$43
MILLION
Department
of Athletics'
budget for the
2004-2005
school year at
UNC
funds this time, it’s a deficit of
about $200,000 to $300,000.
Foundation officials say the dis
parity is caused largely by rising
tuition costs.
“They have projected scholar
ship expenses this year to come in
at 8.1 or 8.2 million dollars,” said
Diane Joyce, director of finance for
the foundation. “I think (our funds
are) going to come a little short.”
The foundation is only expecting
to have about $7-9 million available
for scholarships.
If this year’s scholarship pro
jection of more than $B.l million
SEE FOUNDATION, PAGE 2
ulty meeting, when the initial draft
for an interdisciplinary program in
Western studies was presented.
“Most of the time, faculty sit on
committee because it’s part of our
service. It’s not typical for faculty to
be paid for this,” geography profes
sor Altha Cravey said.
“I don’t recall any of us who didn’t
get paid recommending more cours
es in Western studies.”
But officials stressed that this
practice is common and is not
meant to be surreptitious.
“This is not secret information
that’s being kept under wraps,” said
Judith Wegner, chairwoman of the
faculty. “The people who had been
working on this proposal had been
working extremely hard and received
a stipend of $1,600 relatively small
in comparison to similar situations.”
The revelation likely will fuel the
SEE POPE CENTER, PAGE 4
    

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