North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 112, ISSUE 126
County saw 10,000 youth votes
Majority of college-age voters showed at polls
BY BRIAN HUDSON
SENIOR WRITER
Almost a year after forming a student
voting drive, Student Body President Matt
Calabria now is receiving tangible results of
the initiative for the first time.
And he’s pleased with what he is seeing.
The Orange County Board of Elections is
reporting that 10,090 Orange County voters
between 18 and 24 years of age participated
in November’s election.
About 14,000 voters currently are reg
istered in that demographic, said Carolyn
Thomas, director of the elections board.
Calabria said he believes that
Police
defend
actions
in case
Judge says cops
forced confession
BY EREN TATARAGASI
STAFF WRITER
Despite a judge’s ruling
Monday that practices used by
Carrboro police officers violated
a man’s constitutional rights, the
department still stands beside the
decisions made by its officers.
Orange County Superior Court
Judge Wade Barber ruled Monday
to suppress self-incriminating
statements made by Andrew
Douglas Dalzell concerning the
disappear
ance and pre
sumed death of
Deborah Leigh
Key.
The state
ments were
obtained by
police when
Dalzell was
arrested Sept.
9.
Police
extracted a
confession
from Dalzell
by using a fake
Murder suspect
Andrew
Dalzell
confessed under
police pressure.
warrant that stated that he was
being charged with first-degree
murder.
Police also used a letter stat
ing that he would face the death
f ’alty if he did not confess, writ
t m stationary from District
i. >rney Carl Fox’s office.
Ve understand and respectful
ly Q agree with the court’s deci
sion, said J V Jim Phillips, head
of investigations in Carrboro, on
Tuesday.
“We have always believed the
tactics and methods applied to
this investigation were appro
priate and within the bounds of
existing law and procedure,” said
police in a statement released
Monday. “Despite the Court’s rul-
SEE DALZELL, PAGE 8
Heather Sidden (center) paints a cube in the Pit along with other Board of
Elections members to announce the start of this year's campus elections.
ONLINE
Commissioners lend ear to the public's concerns
Development to include more affordable housing
Keep looking for changes at www.dthonline.com.
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
Slip lathj aar Heel
Vote Carolina, student government’s new
voting initiative, was partly responsible for
the large turnout.
“I’m really pleased with the way things
have gone,” Calabria said. “A significant part
of voter turnout for college students was
Vote Carolina.”
The success of Vote Carolina is based in
learning from the successes and failures of
past voter drives organized, Calabria said.
“I think what we did this year was build
on the efforts of previous administrations,”
he said.
Calabria said he and other student lead
ers used the previous initiatives to deter-
L MM JWfci i nj_ WMM 9IH
Phillip Budisill (orange shirt), a senior at N.C. State
University, shops Tuesday afternoon at Student
Stores for books for his girlfriend, a UNC-Chapel
Hill student who is recovering from surgery. Budisill was
one of the many students shopping for books before the
Family protests award s demise
BY JENNY RUBY
ASSISTANT UNIVERSITY EDITOR
Cornelia Phillips Spencer
championed higher education
opportunities for women and
advocated better schooling for
children, both black and white.
The residence hall named after
her marks Spencer’s numerous
contributions to the University.
And until last month, a presti
gious award bearing her name
honored women and their con
tributions to UNC.
The legacy of the outspoken
woman from the Civil War era
has become complicated by con
troversy over her role as a white
supremacist.
Chancellor James Moeser
INSIDE
GRANTING A WISH
Pell Grant changes won’t have
dramatic effect at UNC PAGE 4
www.dlhonline.com
mine how to run a large-scale voting drive.
Many of the students involved in
Vote Carolina, including Calabria, learned
first hand about voter drives when they
worked on an initiative led by former
Student Body President Matt Tepper.
During the fall 0f2003, Tepper headed a
voter drive that registered about 2,300 new
voters in Orange County, the biggest student
voter registration drive in UNC history.
But the student voice failed to material
ize in that November’s municipal election,
as only 329 voters ages 18 to 22 turned out
to vote.
Vote Carolina Chairman Jeremy Spivey,
who served on the group’s executive board
during November’s elections, said the
organization worked to rectify the previous
HEAVY LIFTING
recently decided to retire the
Cornelia Phillips Spencer Bell
Award following several months
of heated debate, including a
campuswide symposium.
“I hope it will move us on from
annually debating the merits of
Mrs. Spencer herself” Moeser said
Thesday. “(The award’s retirement)
was to protect her and let her rest in
peace rather than having an annual
event that brought to light what she
did and her motives.”
In response, Spencer’s descen
dents have requested that Moeser
reconsider or that he oversee the
removal of Spencer’s name from
Spencer Residence Hall. The fam
ily also wishes to relinquish its ties
to UNC’s Center for the Study of
Candidates prep for election
BOE determined
to have clean race
BY LINDSAY MICHEL
ASSISTANT UNIVERSITY EDITOR
The starting gun will sound
Thursday night for candidates run
ning in the 2005 campus elections
when their first formal meeting with
the Board of Elections adjourns.
During the meeting, board
members will clarify election
codes to ensure that recent chang
es to the Student Code are clearly
understood and followed.
These changes include the addi
tion of a mandatory campaign
briefing that candidates must have
campaign’s shortcomings when organizing
Vote Carolina.
Tepper’s drive offered incentives to stu
dents who registered but did not place
adequate emphasis on voter turnout, Spivey
said.
“If you incentivize one half, you’re not
going to get the results you want,” he said.
Last year’s process involved about a dozen
student organizations in the campuswide
drive to register student voters.
The involvement of student organizations
in the drive was encouraged by a grant from
the Tennessee-based Bentwood Foundation,
which offered 75 cents to groups for each
voter registered in Orange County.
SEE STUDENT VOTE, PAGE 8
start of spring semester classes today. In addition to
browsing the selection at Student Stores, students also
can purchase new and used textbooks in Chapel Hill at
Ram Book & Supply, located at 306 W Franklin St., and
at the Tarheel Book Store, located at 119 E. Franklin St.
“I’m disappointed and sad that they’re
hurt.... I continue to have a very high
regard for (Spencer).” james moeser, CHANCELLOR
the American South if the award
remains inactive.
Moeser listed three possible
fates for the Bell Award in a letter
dated Dec. 3: keeping the award
and offering annual historical
context, changing the award’s
name, or retiring the award.
“In the end, the deciding fac
tor for me was practical,” his letter
states. “Some esteemed women on
our campus women who I think
could be considered for the Bell
Award were asked whether they
with board members each week
and new dorm-storming policies.
After Thursday’s meeting, can
didates will begin petitioning for
signatures.
Those running for student body
president must obtain 800 signa
tures. Hopefuls for senior class offi
cers and Residence Hall Association
president need 350. Residence area
governor candidates must garner
50 signatures, and those vying for
Student Congress must get 20.
This year, campaign workers
who wish to solicit signatures
door to door in residence halls
must register with the residence
community’s front desk and wear
name tags to identify themselves
and their campaign.
SPORTS
A RUDE WELCOME
Tar Heels' defense fails in the final quarter
as BC, future ACC foe, wins 37-24 PAGE 11
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 12, 2005
DTH/JUSTIN SMITH
would accept it if it were offered.
Their answer was ‘no.”
Charles Love, chairman of
the Martha and Spencer Love
Foundation and one of Spencer’s
descendents, said he believes
Moeser failed to explore the options.
Love said the decision singles out
Spencer, though there are several
other storied white supremacists
in the University’s history who have
not received the same treatment.
SEE BELL AWARD, PAGE 8
Dorm-storming will be permit
ted from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Monday
through Thursday during the
campaign season.
Board members suggest that
students who do not want solici
tations should post a temporary
notice on their door. Campaign
workers still will be able to post
their Web site address and infor
mation on residents’ doors.
Gathering the many signatures
could be difficult, but student
body president candidate Seth
Dearmin remains confident.
“The only strategy (we have) is
to be out on campus, in the Pit,
getting the word out and being
SEE ELECTIONS, PAGE 8
WEATHER
TODAY Partly cloudy, H 72, L 56
THURSDAY Showers/wind, H 73, L 51
FRIDAY Showers, H 56, L 26
UNC
board
mulls
tuition
BOG’s chairman
opposes increases
BY EMMA BURGIN
STATE & NATIONAL EDITOR
Tuition talks will kick off at a
committee meeting Thursday for
the UNC system’s governing body,
and members will come into the
discussion with guidance from
their leading official.
Board of Governors Chairman
Brad Wilson urged the board on
Dec. 13 to vote against system
wide and campus-initiated tuition
increases.
“The time was right to make it
clear, at least, what my position
was on tuition for this year,” Wilson
said. “(It gave) board members
enough time to think about what I
had to say and come to the January
meeting better prepared.”
Wilson also sent a letter remind
ing UNC-system President Molly
Broad and system chancellors
about UNC’s constitutional mis
sion to provide higher education at
a low cost to North Carolinians.
Members of the board’s Budget
and Finance Committee will start
talks Thursday while looking at a
study on how campuses were affect
ed this year by tuition revenue.
The committee and full board
will continue discussions in
February, and the board is slated
for a final vote in March.
Wilson said he would like the
board to halt tuition increases this
year to give officials time to investi
gate some type of tuition certainty.
The UNC system’s finance depart
ment already has been asked to
investigate the tuition certainty pro
gram at Illinois’ public universities.
“Illinois has an approach where
SEE BOG, PAGE 8
Potential
incident of
meningitis
reported
FROM STAFF REPORTS
A report of meningitis hit the
campus community Tuesday,
potentially marking the second
case of the highly contagious and
possibly fatal infection in the past
four months.
A student who lives in Morrison
Residence Hall was admitted to
UNC Hospitals on Tuesday and
diagnosed with symptoms of
meningococcal meningitis. More
concrete results most likely will
be released today.
The student returned to campus
Sunday night but did not experi
ence symptoms until Monday.
Officials from the Orange
County Health Department inter
viewed the student and are in the
process of notifying others who
could have had close contact with
the patient.
Officials said they don’t antici
pate releasing the patient’s name to
the public because they have been
able to identify contacts quickly.
Those who shared a household
with the student or had direct con
tact with oral secretions through
kissing or sharing a drink are at
risk, according to the health depart
ment. The incubation period var
ies from two to 10 days but is most
commonly three to four days.
Students who have questions
should contact Student Health
Service, and faculty and staff can
seek information from the Employee
Occupational Health Clinic.
SEE MENINGITIS, PAGE 8
    

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