North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 112, ISSUE 133
Proposal may alter funding
■
Scholarships, athletics would get boosts
BY EMILY STEEL
UNIVERSITY EDITOR
In the eleventh hour before the
University’s governing board finalizes
recommendations for tuition and stu
dent fee increases, a two-part proposal
to bolster funds for merit scholarships
and athletic programs has surfaced.
Judith Wegner, chairwoman of the
faculty, is calling for the chancellor and
members of the Board of Trustees to
reassess the allocation of funds gar
Chairwoman of
the Faculty
Judith Wegner
has proposed
shifts in athletic
funding.
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DTH PHOTO ILLUSTRATION/JUSTIN SMITH
A portrait of Cornelia Phillips Spencer hangs in Wilson Library. Last month, Chancellor James Moeser retired the Bell Award, given to significant female contributors to the
University in honor of Spencer. This weekend, Moeser announced the formation of a committee that will examine whether UNC ought to bestow such an exclusive honor.
Award panel will look inward
BY JENNY RUBY
ASSISTANT UNIVERSITY EDITOR
A positive solution to the controversy about the
naming of a University award for women could be in
sight now that Chancellor James Moeser has estab
lished a committee to examine the issue.
Moeser retired the Cornelia Phillips Spencer
Bell Award, named after a University figure of the
Reconstruction era, after questions arose regarding
Spencer’s role as a white supremacist. The decision
has drawn much criticism from Spencer’s descen
dents and members of the University community.
Now he is looking at a variety of options, including
naming the award after Spencer’s descendents.
“If the committee decides that we do need an
award for women, I will ask them to consider the cre
ation of an award to honor the outstanding service
given to the University by a succession of members
of the Phillips, Spencer and Love families,” Moeser
states in a letter sent to Spencer’s family Thursday.
SEE AWARD, PAGE 5
Students have a ball at presidential bash
BY JACQUELINE BRILL
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR
WASHINGTON, D.C. - While most
were content to sip their Korbel cham
pagne one glass at a time, the younger
crowd that gathered to celebrate the
55th presidential inauguration Thursday
preferred to hit up makeshift bars for
entire bottles.
“You only get one chance at this life
thing, and i’m going to make the most
of it,” said Taylor Rankin, a 2003 UNC
graduate, before he poured himself a
cup from a bottle emblazoned with the
inaugural seal.
The bubbly stuff was flowing like
water Thursday night at the Washington
Convention Center’s Democracy Ball, one
of the nine inaugural black-tie affairs,
and the many college students in atten
dance were enjoying every drop of it.
“This is just so exciting because we’re
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Serving the students and the University community since 1893
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nered through trademark logo revenue.
She also wants officials to increase the
student athletic fee by $l5O.
“It is a policy call that maybe we
need to realign, rethink and change,”
she said. “I believe in fiscal responsibil
ity. If you’ve got a chronic issue here,
how do you weigh these demands?”
This proposal, which will debut
during a special meeting of the
Chancellor’s Committee on Student
Fees today, comes at the peak of tuition
“The last
thing we
wanted
... was to
condemn
Cornelia
Phillips
Spencer
or to erase
herfrom
our past.”
JAMES MOESER,
CHANCELLOR
college students and at such a historic
event,” said UNC senior Audra Noble.
“In college, you can be so far removed
from everything, and that makes this
really special.”
Ellen Cochran, a third-year law stu
dent at the University of Kentucky,
echoed the sentiment. “I’m just so
thrilled and honored to be at such a
huge event,” she said.
Upon entering the Democracy Ball
which hosted visitors from such
states as North Carolina, Kentucky and
California holders of the $2,500 tick
ets were treated to live music, dancing
and a small feast of tortellini in addition
to liquid refreshment provided by sev
eral bars scattered throughout the facil
ity. Mingling with like-minded guests
seemed to be a highlight for most of the
students, though.
“It’s really great being here with so
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discussions, when members of student
government have just begun to solicit
input and mobilize the student voice.
Student government is hosting a
forum about tuition at 7 p.m. today in
116 Murphey Hall.
Trustees will vote on student fees and
campus-based tuition increases during
their meeting this week. In addition to
a proposed $64.50 fee increase, three
tuition-hike proposals are on the table:
$350 for in-state students and SBOO for
out-of-state students; S3OO in-state and
SI,OOO out-of-state; and $250 for resi
dents and $1,200 for nonresidents.
Spencer left UNC a legacy
that’s difficult to define
BY JULIA FURLONG
STAFF WRITER
Those familiar with University lore know
Cornelia Phillips Spencer best as the woman
who rang the bell.
Spencer long has been renowned for grab
bing the rope of the campus belfry on March
20,1875, upon receiving a long-awaited tele
gram from Raleigh informing her that UNC
was to reopen after running out of funds and
students in 1871.
Generations after her death, heated debate
continues on how she should be remembered.
many Bush supporters,” said Melanie
Stephens, a sophomore at the University
of Virginia. “It’s really good company.”
Nothing brought more enthusiasm to
the crowd than the appearance of the
guests of honor. Although the party got
started at 7 p.m., it was not until 8:30
that the orchestra began to play the
quintessential Washington tune as Vice
President Dick Cheney and his wife,
Lynne, came onstage.
“When they played ‘Hail to the Chief,’
the hairs on the back of my neck stood
up,” said Hunter Rankin, a senior
journalism major at UNC and Taylor’s
younger brother.
This brief visit only increased the
level of anticipation in the room the
president was expected to appear short
ly after 10 p.m. Instead, he and Laura
SEE BALL, PAGE 5
The revenues generated through the
tuition increases would fund need-based
aid, teaching assistant salaries and fac
ulty salaries as well as increase the size
of the faculty the priorities recom
mended by the Tuition Task Force.
But Wegner said other University
needs such as merit scholarships and
a stable source of funding for athletics
must be addressed before it is too late.
“If it is a true need, we need to look at
it in the eye and say it is a true need.”
The UNC-system Board of
SEE TUITION, PAGE 5
Last month, Chancellor James Moeser decid
ed to retire the 11-year-old Bell Award that had
been given in Spencer’s honor to women who
had significantly contributed to the University.
This action followed a two-year campaign,
led by history graduate student Yonni Chapman,
which sought to publicize Spencer’s support of
white supremacy. Some of her writings sup
ported the Ku Klux Klan and railed against
those who did not harbor racial prejudice.
“No matter what she did, she set back black
SEE SPENCER, PAGE 5
M9|, v |E
COURTESY OF MIKE PARADIS
President George W. Bush enjoys a brief dance with his wife, Laura, Thursday evening at the
Washington Convention Center. UNC students joined others in one of the nine inaugural balls.
SPORTS
CALMING THE STORM
Tar Heels' physical play helps them welcome
Miami to the ACC in an 87-67 rout PAGE 12
MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 2005
Rocca
agrees
to give
speech
TV personality
to speak May 13
BY JOSEPH R. SCHWARTZ
ASSISTANT UNIVERSITY EDITOR
Mo Rocca has summed up the
essence of the ’7os, ’Bos and ’9os,
but now he’s setting his sights on
crafting a fitting tribute for the
class of 2005.
The former “The Daily Show”
correspondent and personality
from VHl’s decade-themed variety
series accepted
a $19,500 offer
Friday to deliv
er UNC’s first
Senior Class
Address.
Rocca will
receive SIB,OOO
in speaker fees,
along with
$1,500 to cover
travel expenses
for the May 13
event, which
will take place
on the steps of
South Building.
Bringing Rocca to campus was
a three-month collaborative effort
waged by senior class officers, the
executive branch of student gov
ernment and the Student Advisory
Committee to the Chancellor.
The groups’ work came to frui
tion with monetary aid through
student fees, the Office of the
Provost, the Division of Student
Affairs and the Campus Y.
“It’s such a wonderful demon
stration of how this campus can
work together to make things hap
pen for students,” said Senior Class
Vice President Becca Frucht.
“I think the whole experience
really kind of renewed my faith in
the way these things can work out.”
Members of SACC, a group
spearheaded by Student Body Vice
President Alexa Kleysteuber, set
the wheels in motion at their first
meeting, noting that several seniors
had expressed discontent about the
Commencement speaker process.
The body created three plans
to quell these concerns, each of
which was received favorably by
UNC administrators:
■ The addition of a student
to the Commencement speaker
committee;
■ an annual meeting between
Provost Robert Shelton and can
didates for senior class president
and vice president to explain the
Commencement speaker selection
process;
■ and the creation of the Senior
Class Address.
Kleysteuber then consulted
Senior Class President Jovian
Irvin and Frucht, who drew
SEE ROCCA, PAGE 5
WEATHER
TODAY Sunny, H 41, L 26
TUESDAY Sunny, H 51, L 33
WEDNESDAY Few showers, H 60, L 32
1
TV personality
Mo Rocca
will deliver
the first Senior
Class Address.
O
    

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