North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 112, ISSUE 134
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DTH/RICKY LEUNG
Jerry Lucido, vice provost for enrollment management, speaks about
the 2005-2006 tuition increase possibilities at a forum Monday night.
Body
vetoes
hike
in fees
Students decide
against proposal
BY CATHERINE ROBBS
STAFF WRITER
A last-minute proposal to
increase student fees by $l5O
was deemed inappropriate by the
Student Fee Audit Committee on
Monday night.
The proposal which is still on
the table for the Board oflVustees to
vote on this week seeks to create
a stable source of funding for merit
based scholarships and athletics.
The 25 percent of logo sales that
now fund athletics would be reallo
cated to fund merit-based scholar
ships. The loss in revenue for ath
letics would then be covered by a
$l5O increase in the athletic fee.
Members of the student com
mittee did not see the realignment
of funds as a legitimate use of stu
dent fees.
“Student fees aren’t presented
as a deal or a trade,” said Student
Body Treasurer Natalie Russell.
“We examine them based on the
services they provide.”
While students recognized that
both merit-based scholarships and
the Department of Athletics dem
onstrate sufficient need, they said
that increasing student fees isn’t
the solution.
“This is a situation of pinning
students with an extra financial
burden to make up for money lost,”
Russell said.
The committee also voiced
concern about the time line of the
issue, as Judith Wegner, chair
woman of the faculty, presented
the proposal just days before the
trustees are slated to decide on
both tuition and fee increases.
Trustees already are consider
ing a $64.50 student fee increase,
which passed through a series of
committees charged with research
ing all options. The athletics fee
now taxes students $98.50.
“We are going to have to be care
ful over the years just how much
we are asking in-state and out-of
state students to bear,” said Richard
“Stick” Williams, chairman of the
SEE STUDENT FEES, PAGE 4
FEE COMPARISON
A proposed increase of $l5O in athletics fees
will result in fees totaling $250.50 for 2005-06.
UNC System Athletic Fee (2004-05)
Appalachian State $351.00
East Carolina $336.00
Elizabeth City State $331.00
Fayetteville State $273.00
N.C.A&T $376.00
N.C. Central $320.00
UNC-Asheville $438.00
UNC-Charlotte $365.00
UNC-Greensboro $361.00
UNC-Pembroke $371.00
UNC-Wilmington $343.00
Western Carolina $528.00
Winston-Salem State $336.00
NCSU $94.00
UNC-Chapel Hill $98.50
SOURCE: JUDITH WEGNER
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North Carolina point guard Ivory
Latta (12) shows her enthusiasm
as the Tar Heels take down No. 1
Duke, 56-51, in the Smith Center on Monday
night. Latta played all 40 minutes and
Illinois’ plan
for tuition
offers model
BY MEGAN MCSWAIN
ASSISTANT STATE 81 NATIONAL EDITOR
If the UNC system likes what it sees, it could
mimic a tuition-certainty policy that has main
tained costs in the University of Illinois system.
In the guaranteed-tuition plan, Illinois students
pay a constant rate of tuition during a four-year
undergraduate degree program.
“Giving parents and families a chance to proj
ect and plan ahead is the (program’s) benefit,” said
Thomas Eakman, executive assistant vice presi
dent for academic affairs at Ul-Chicago.
The UNC system is still in the early stages of
looking into how well a guaranteed-tuition policy
would benefit its students, said Jeff Davies, the
system’s vice president for finance.
“I like the concept of locking in a tuition rate,
but I don’t know what that impact would be on the
freshman class,” he said.
The UNC-system Board of Governors is using
Illinois’ two-year-old program as a guide.
The board is planning to ask a representative
from the system to discuss the pros and cons of
the program’s implementation, said BOG member
Jim Phillips, chairman of the Budget and Finance
Committee.
“We’re on a fact-finding mission,” Phillips said,
adding that the speaker will visit the board in the
SEE ILLINOIS, PAGE 4
INSIDE
WATERING HOLE
New members-only bar fills space
left vacant by Go! Room 4 PAGE 6
www.dthonline.com
Leaders explain tuition
Students react strongly to proposals
BY STEPHANIE NEWTON
STAFF WRITER
Student government leaders are
down to the wire in their efforts to
mobilize students to be proactive
about increases to campus-based
tuition and student fees.
“It took us a semester to wrap
our mind around the tuition issue,”
said Matt Calabria, student body
president. “It’s a very, very complex
situation.”
Calabria and Alexa Kleysteuber,
HER AIRNESS
recorded 13 points and 5 rebounds to help
No. 12 UNC end a 12-game drought to the
Blue Devils that dated back to Feb. 27,2000.
UNC defeated a No. 1-ranked opponent for
the first time. For the full story, see page 9.
Jensen snags endorsement from Dems.
BY ELIZABETH BLACK
STAFF WRITER
After a fiery debate Monday, Tom
Jensen took home the Young Democrats’
endorsement in the first forum of this
year’s student body president campaign.
While all candidates did a great job
and presented good ideas, Jensen’s ideas
spoke to the majority of the group’s
members, said Blakely Whilden, co
president of Young Democrats.
Jensen, who has been a member of
Young Democrats since his freshman
year, served as party affairs director last
fall and was key in organizing campaign
operations.
“Minority issues was key,” Whilden
said. “He has good ideas to reach out to
the minorities in any sense of the word.”
Jensen’s platform ideas including
support for the Green Energy Initiative,
open relations with the Chapel Hill
Town Council as a member of Students
for a Progressive Chapel Hill, a reform of
student government funding and tuition
plans addressed many concerns of the
more than 80 members who voted.
The forum was the first of the cam
paign season, a provision set in the
Young Democrats’ constitution.
“Our endorsement can be a pretty big
tool, considering our listserv will go out
to over 2,000 students,” said Peter Tinti,
Young Democrats secretary. The winner
of the past two student body president
elections was endorsed by YD.
At the beginning of the forum, can
didate Seke Ballard passed out a cri-
IS
student body vice president, pre
sented a forum on the setting for
tuition and fees for the 2005-06
academic year Monday night.
Aside from informing the doz
ens of graduate, undergradu
ates, in-state and out-of-state
students in attendance, Calabria
and Kleysteuber hoped to garner
student feedback that will serve
as ammunition at the Board of
Trustees meetings this week.
Of three possible tuition com-
DTH/GARRETT HALL
881
jets.
In 4
DTH/JULIA LEBETKIN
Student body president candidates Seke Ballard (center) and Seth Dearmin (right)
listen to moderator Peter Tinti during the Young Democrats' forum Monday night.
tique of Jensen’s and candidate Seth
Dearmin’s platforms an uncommon
move in recent history.
Tinti moderated the forum, asking
eight questions that focused on issues
important to the organization rang
ing from minority issues to the Green
Energy Initiative, a campaign to improve
the campus environment by supporting
renewable energy sources.
“That referendum was very important
INSIDE
MINESWEEP 2005
Students perform to create awareness
of post-tsunami dangers in Asia PAGE 3
binations, the option promoting a
$250 increase for in-state students
and a $1,200 increase for out-of
state students the greatest dis
parity is the choice Chancellor
James Moeser intends to endorse
for the board, Calabria said.
“I don’t know where you draw
the line,” said Jake Parton, a
freshman economics major from
Tallahassee, Fla. “There’s a dispar
ity between in-state and out-of
state it’s just a slap in the face.”
Once the flood gates were opened,
the emotions continued to flow.
“I had a seventh grade history
Officials predict
change for CAA
Autonomy of group hangs in balance
BY ERIN ZUREICK
STAFF WRITER
The tensions that have escalated
between members of student gov
ernment and the Carolina Athletic
Association will reach a breaking
point Wednesday with a public hear
ing to discuss major changes to the
association.
While ticket distribution poli
cies have been the focus of recent
debate, more will be at stake for the
CAA, including the group’s role as
an autonomous organization and
changes to Homecoming.
Officials expect some radical
proposals to surface from Student
Congress’ newly formed athletics
committee, as well as individual
sources.
Proposals range from eliminat
ing the section of the Student Code
that legitimizes the CAA to making
the CAA presidency an appointed
rather than an elected position and
forming a ticket distribution review
board, said Trey Winslett, chairman
of the athletics committee.
The athletics committee was
formed last fall after CAA received
much criticism when it failed to
book rock band Sister Hazel for the
Homecoming concert after promis
ing the band’s appearance.
Since then, the committee has
been working to alter certain
aspects of CAA operations, includ
ing student ticket distribution and
the number of tickets set aside for
CAA members.
But members of the CAA are
expressing their concerns, calling
the proposals uninformed.
CAA President Lindsay Strunk
said it is imperative that students
continue to elect the CAA president
WEATHER
TODAY Sunny, H 49, L 32
WEDNESDAY Partly cloudy, H 60, L 31
THURSDAY Mostly sunny, H 40, Ll 9
TUESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2005
teacher who said, ‘Don’t monkey
with the middle class,’ and that’s
exactly what’s going on here,” said
Renan Snowden, a senior political
science major from Washington,
D.C. “For a University of the people,
I feel like we have nothing to offer.”
In a quick response, Jerry Lucido,
vice provost for enrollment man
agement, noted that no state in the
country can afford its higher educa
tion system.
“I won’t make you feel better
about writing that check, but I
SEE TUITION, PAGE 4
so the group remains accountable.
“There is a lack of knowledge
(in student government),” she said.
“They don’t understand the work
ings of the athletic department or
the logistics behind the decisions
CAA makes.”
In light of recent criticism and in
hopes of providing a better under
standing of CAA, the association
released a fall
2004 report
Monday. The
document out
lines the respon
sibilities of the
organization
and discusses
possible policy
changes.
CAATreasurer
Ginny Franks
said the CAA
is admitting its
mistakes and
CAA President
Lindsay Strunk
hopes her post
remains an
elected one.
trying to correct them.
“We want to increase communica
tion and give students insight on the
inner workings of CAA,” she said.
CAA’s report notes that the
group receives less than $6,000 of
its $50,000 budget from Student
Congress allocations.
If an athletics committee pro
posal passes, CAA expenditures of
S2OO or more would need approval
from either the Finance Committee
of Congress or the student body
treasurer.
Franks said the athletic commit
tee failed to get proper input from
the CAA for the proposal. “(The
limit) would cripple events that have
a quick turnaround,” she said.
SEE CAA REPORT, PAGE 4
to us,” Tinti said. “We want to get candi
dates on the record saying they support
this campaign.”
Jensen is the only candidate who has
not taken part in Student Congress or the
executive branch of student government.
“Since Tom is an outsider looking in, I
think he may have appealed to some stu
dents not involved with student govem-
SEE YD FORUM, PAGE 4
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