North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 112, ISSUE 137
Trustees pass hikes, athletic fees
APPROVE TUITION INCREASES OF S2OO AND $950 FOR 2005-06
BY EMILY STEEL
UNIVERSITY EDITOR
With two separate votes
Thursday morning, the University’s
governing board set into action a
pair of propos
als that would
tack an extra
SI,OOO for
nonresidents
and $250 for
in-state-stu
dents onto the
INSIDE
Members
of student
government rail
against fee hike.
PAGE 3
bill to attend UNC.
The tuition proposal, which
would generate a total of about
$7.4 million to fund top University
priorities, includes an increase of
$950 for out-of-state students and
2 new
deans
to join
faculty
Dentistry, public
health get leaders
BY RACHEL BROCK
STAFF WRITER
The new leaders of two of
UNC’s professional schools were
confirmed yesterday at a meeting
of the Board of Trustees.
Dr. John Williams, dean of the
school of dentistry at the University
of Louisville, will take the head slot
at the School of Dentistry.
Barbara Rimer, an alumni dis
tinguished professor in the School
of Public Health, will fill that
school’s post.
“They’re both great appoint-
ments,” said
Richard “Stick”
Williams,
chairman of
the BOT.
“Both of
these schools
are so impor
tant to the
University,
and it’s good
to have the
leadership on
campus behind
them.”
Rimer, who
also serves as
deputy direc
tor for popula
tion sciences
at UNC’s
Lineberger
Comprehensive
Cancer Center,
will assume
her new' role
June 1.
Margaret
Dardess, who
has served as
interim dean
of the school-
Dentistry dean
John Williams
is leaving
Louisville for the
post at UNC.
UNC professor
Barbara Rimer
will take over
the helm in
public health.
during the search process, said
she is delighted with the appoint
ment.
“She will provide true leader
ship to take the school to anew
level,” Dardess said. “She will bring
challenges to take the school into
the 21st century.”
Rimer said the school will
focus on several key areas in the
next few years, including obesity,
global health and national secu
rity.
“We will take care that what
we learn in academic research
will get translated into practice,”
she said.
“By solving problems it will
enable people to lead healthier
lives.”
Chancellor James Moeser said
SEE DEANS, PAGE 4
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Serving the students and the University community since 1893
01ir lailn (Ear Rcrl
S2OO for in-state students.
These hikes work in tan
dem with a two-year athletic fee
increase ssO next year and SIOO
the following year that would
secure funds for
a merit-scholar
ship program
and put the
Olympic sports
program on solid
ground.
“What we are
INSIDE
SBP candidates
weigh in on
the BOT's
tuition plans.
PAGE 2
really trying to do is balance a num
ber of needs to move us where we
need to move as a university,” Trustee
Karol Mason said before the board
approved the proposals.
Through the fee proposal, intro-
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The University’s vice provost for enrollment manage
ment, Jerry Lucido (right), fights off the defense of
UNC women’s lacrosse coach Jenny Levy in a bas
ketball game played by the original rules from 1891. The
game, which occurred at halftime during Thursday’s worn
Schisms apparent in Raleigh
BY LAURA YOUNGS
SENIOR WRITER
The 2005-06 legislative season
began only two days ago, but divi
sions already are evident.
Members of the N.C.
House gave the green light
Wednesday to Reps. Jim Black,
D-Mecklenburg, and Richard
Morgan, R-Moore, to take the
respective positions of speaker
and speaker pro tern.
Not everyone was onboard
2O Republican representatives
voted against the two men who
shared the speakership in the last
session.
If those divisions carry over
during the rest of the ses
sion, some say, the effects on
■£*■■■ .... 1
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IBp iMa
DTH/GILLIAN BOLSOVER
Historian and UNC professor Doug Eyre will speak about the history of the
Horace Williams Airport at 3 p.m. Sunday at the Chapel Hill Public Library.
INSIDE
FOREIGN AGENTS
Spyware takes increasing hold at
colleges throughout nation PAGE 7
www.dihonline.com
duced this week by Chairwoman
of the Faculty Judith Wegner, rev
enues generated from merchandise
that bears the University’s trade
mark would shift from funding
athletics to funding merit schol
arships. The student fee increase
then would fill the hole created in
the athletics budget.
Administrators said the athletics
fee proposal was “dead on arrival”
at the trustees’ University Affairs
Committee meeting Wednesday.
The Student Fee Audit
Committee and the Chancellor’s
Committee on Student Fees reject
ed the proposal when it surfaced
earlier this week. Both groups dis
approved of the proposal’s timing
OLD SCHOOL
the Republican Party could be
strong.
“The co-speakership and
the ripple effect of that pro
duced divisions ... within the
Republican Party,” said Ferrel
Guillory, director of UNC’s
Program on Southern Politics,
Media and Public Life.
“And some of that has lin
gered. And so the potency of the
Republican Party in the legisla
ture, while real, has diminished
somewhat because of those divi
sions.”
Though Republicans lost
some ground this election cycle
in.terms of seats, they are still a
strong force within the state leg
islature.
and the precedent it could set for
student fee funding priorities.
But the athletic fee increase took
center stage during discussions at
Thursday’s meeting of the full BOT.
Trustee Rusty Carter, chairman
of the University Affairs Committee,
said the board has been wrestling
with a way to provide merit-based
scholarships for years. He said he
would not support tuition increases
until such a plan was constructed.
“We absolutely have to do some
thing about merit scholarships,”
he said. “We absolutely have to do
something about Olympic sports.
We absolutely have to do some-
SEE BOT, PAGE 4
en’s basketball game between North Carolina and Wake
Forest at Carmichael Auditorium, featured North Carolina
coaches, athletes and members of the University commu
nity. The rules included no out of bounds, required hand
dribbling in the air and multiple balls at the same time.
But Guillory said division
could potentially harm the party
as it tries to put forth its agen
da.
In recent sessions, Republicans
have favored cuts in spending
and lower taxes, and have talked
about the possibility of a consti
tutional ban on same-sex mar
riages.
Morgan and Black have forged
a working relationship that has
crossed party lines. Still, Guillory
said, disagreements are natural,
and issues pushed aside during
the co-speakership such as
the death penalty probably
will resurface with one party in
power.
Division among members of any
Local to chronicle airport
Professor will tell tale of founders
BY KATHRYN REED
STAFF WRITER
Recent discussions on the
renaming of Airport Road and the
development of the Carolina North
satellite campus have brought the
Horace Williams Airport into the
spotlight.
But the airport’s history, says
local historian Doug Eyre, is
equally noteworthy.
“It’s a topic of general interest,”
Eyre said of the airport. “It attracts
a lot of attention and dispute.”
Eyre will present a lecture on
SPORTS
BUMP N’ GRIND
In a physical game, Tar Heels roll past
Demon Deacons at home., 83-61 PAGE 7
*• s
DTH/GILLIAN BOLSOVER
Chancellor James Moeser and members of the University's Board of
Trustees deliberate tuition increases and the athletics fee hike Thursday.
DTH/GILLIAN BOLSOVER
political party is not uncommon.
But many Republicans’ alignment
with Black will make things more
difficult for the GOP, Guillory
said.
“It is clear that... Morgan and
his allies have positioned them
selves closer to the center of power
than the dissident Republicans,” he
said.
“So the dissident Republicans
have to figure out do they want
to spend the whole session being
dissident, and what does that
mean for their constituents?
“Or are they going to recog
nize how the power has flowed
in the legislature, and are they
SEE LEGISLATURE, PAGE 4
the history of the airport at 3 p.m.
Sunday at the Chapel Hill Public
Library as part of the Sunday
Lecture Series, sponsored by the
Friends of the Chapel Hill Public
Library.
Eyre and his wife, Olga, have
lived in Chapel Hill for the last 47
years.
A 44-year professor of geogra
phy at the University, Eyre also
writes a monthly column for The
Chapel Hill News about the town’s
history since the 19205.
But he said he has always been
WEATHER
TODAY Mostly sunny, H 37, L 17
SATURDAY Wintry mix, H 34, L 32
SUNDAY Rain, H 45, L 31
FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 2005
Town
key in
campus
election
Candidates look
at local relations
BY ADAM W. RHEW
STAFF WRITER
While the post of student body
president typically is viewed in
terms of its connections to the
University, this year’s candidates for
the top student office say they are
thinking beyond campus issues.
Student body president hope-
fu 1 s Se k e
Ballard, Leigha
Blackwell, Seth
Dearmin and
Tom Jensen all
have included
planks in their
platforms that
address the rela
tionship between
the University
and the town of
Chapel Hill.
“We need to
be more in the
mind-set that
we are residents
Council member
Mark
Kleinschmidt
encouraged
student input.
of Chapel Hill, as well as students
at the University,” Dearmin said.
Ballard’s platform includes a push
for the acknowledgement of the “co
dependent relationship” between
the University and the town.
Blackwell said she will push for
more positive interaction between
the town and the University.
If elected, she said she will cre
ate a committee that will help
bridge gaps between the two enti
ties something Town Council
member Mark Kleinschmidt said
is of utmost importance.
“We make decisions every day
that affect how students live,” said
Kleinschmidt, who himself was a
member of student government
SEE TOWN, PAGE 4
interested in history.
“He’s one of our noted histori
ans,” said Joe Capowski, a former
mayor of Chapel Hill.
Eyre is a 30-year member of
the Chapel Hill Historical Society
and a charter member of both the
Preservation Society in Chapel Hill
and the Chapel Hill Museum.
Eyre said his lecture Sunday
will focus on facts and anecdotes
about the individuals who con
tributed to the founding of the
airport.
Two of the contributors owned a
garage on the comer of Rosemary
SEE EYRE, PAGE 4
O
    

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