North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 112, ISSUE 148
Board votes down in-state hikes
LEGISLATURE NOW HAS FINAL
SAY OVER TUITION INCREASES
BY ERIC JOHNSON
ASSISTANT STATE & NATIONAL EDITOR
WILMINGTON There was
no discussion and no dissent as
the UNC system’s governing body
voted to reject any rise in next
year’s tuition for in-state students.
In unanimously adopting the
recommendation of its Budget and
Finance Committee, the Board of
Governors elfectively left it to the
N.C. General Assembly to meet the
Unique plans
might garner
student votes
Candidates stress tangible goals
BY KATIE CLINE
STAFF WRITER
From establishing a student government group on
Thefacebook to creating an on-campus farmer’s market, can
didates for student body president are offering a combination
of unusual promises to garner votes.
With only two days left in their campaigns for student body
president, candidates Seke Ballard and Seth Dearmin have
posters and slogans displaying their campaign promises scat
tered throughout campus in hopes of swaying voters.
When students visit Student Central to vote in the runoff
election Tuesday, they will decide between two unique plat
forms and two unique visions.
Ballard’s headliner proposal is to
make a group specifically for student
government on Thefacebook.com, a Web
site devoted to connecting college stu
dents within the University and at other
schools.
He said most students aren’t able to
recognize student government officials on
campus and hopes the group could solve
that.
“Why not utilize technology to make
student government the most accessible it
can be?” Ballard said.
Ballard also is hoping to set up a pro
gram to put student evaluations online in
order to “make faculty more accountable”
for their classes.
Dearmin said the more standout
issues addressed in his platform focus
on promoting a healthy campus lifestyle.
He hopes to establish an on-campus
farmers’ market, to bring more workout
equipment to the Student Recreation
Center and to make condoms available
in residence halls.
“We have to realize we can make chang
es, but also change things that can be more
fun,” he said.
But candidates and students alike said
that this year’s election is driven more by
major issues on campus.
■
SBP candidate
Seke Ballard
plans a group
on Thefacebook
for government.
Fa
SBP candidate
Seth Dearmin
wants condoms
to be available
in residences.
“Students are definitely most concerned
with tuition,” Ballard said.
“Tuition, tuition, tuition.”
Kristin Economo, a freshman international studies major,
also said tuition issues will determine many votes.
“It is better to have a stance to negotiate tuition rather than
flat out reject tuition increases,” she said.
Dearmin said he believes the issue that students are most
concerned with is town relations.
He is hoping to make the University’s campus a single vot
ing precinct in order to allow students to have a larger voice
SEE PLATFORMS, PAGE 4
Disputed races spark
scrutiny of elections
BY MARK PUENTE
STAFF WRITER
Two disputed contests on
Election Day in North Carolina
had all the flavor of the 2000
presidential race, featuring
everything except the hanging
chads.
Now, with one of the races
only recently decided and the
other still up in the air, the par
tisan nature of the State Board of
Elections and North Carolina’s
mechanisms for deciding close
races have come under fire.
Democrats hold a 3-2 edge
over Republicans on the Board of
Elections, which many say has led
to partisan decision-making. And
the prolonged legal wrangling
ONLINE
Local bloggers gather, study craft
Speaker talks problems in Colombia
Carrboro mulls new housing program
Serving the students and the University comm unity since 1893
01>r Satin (Ear MM
needs outlined by university chan
cellors.
“The significant needs of the
university cannot be met and
solved by tuition alone,” said BOG
Chairman Brad Wilson. “We need
to continue to work hard and part
ner with the General Assembly ...
to solve the root causes of the prob
lems you saw (during chancellors’
presentations).”
That doesn’t mean students will
A
MB
Democrat
Britt Cobb
criticized the
State Board of
Elections for
its handling of
the agriculture
race this year.
has legislators calling for reforms
to the system.
“We ought to be able to see a
clear winner,” said N.C. Rep. Doug
Vinson, R-Mecklenburg. “It’s not
fair to the voters or candidates.”
The race for the commissioner
of agriculture ended Feb. 4, three
months after the votes were tab-
SEE BOE, PAGE 4
Aldermen set priorities for 2005
Board shoots down yearround school
For these stories, visit dthonline.com.
www.dthonllne.coiii
completely escape increased costs.
Friday’s decision could put
more pressure on the Board
of Governors to consider rais
ing tuition for nonresidents and
graduate students, in addition to
potential hikes in student fees.
“I do think that the action of
not raising in-state, undergradu
ate tuition will bring sharper focus
on the need for out-of-state tuition
increases,” Wilson said.
The gulf between resident
and nonresident tuition at some
schools could widen substantially
if the board approves out-of-state
increases next month.
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Actors retell the stories of women inter
viewed by Eve Ensler, author of “The
Vagina Monologues,” during the stage
production Saturday in Gerrard Hall. The
monologues combined humorous performanc
Law enforcement saw early diversity
BY RYAN C. TUCK
CITY EDITOR
Fifty-three demonstrators
arrested, doused with ammonia
and laundry bleach.
Sixteen
arrested at sit-in,
including staff
ers from both
UNC and Duke
University.
Fourteen of
45 demonstra
tors from lie-in
arrested.
These excerpts from articles
in The Chapel Hill Weekly in the
years surrounding the passage of
the 1964 Civil Rights Act might
read like any others from the same
period, but with one distinction:
the color of the arresting hands.
“There will always be a gap, and
that gap is probably going to increase
some,” said board member Ray
Farris. “The question is, how much
and when? I don’t think it ought to
be as extreme as it has been.”
UNC-system President Molly
Broad said the board is statuto-
SHOWTIME
es with accounts of rape and violence commit
ted against women. This year’s V-Day Spotlight
focused on Iraqi women who have experienced
rape and abduction throughout the current
war. For full coverage of the event, see page 7-
“In school, the black kids would
give us stuff because he was a cop
... and white kids would give us
stuff because we were black,” said
David Caldwell Jr., whose father
was one of the Chapel Hill Police
Department’s first black officers.
Chapel Hill was one of the most
progressive areas in integrating its
police department, said current
police Chief Gregg Jarvies, who
joined the force in 1976 with many
of the arresting officers from the
1960s serving as his supervisors.
Jeff Foushee was hired to the
force in 1947- By the early 19505, two
of the force’s 14 officers were black.
According to a front-page picture
of the police force in The Chapel Hill
Weekly in 1952, “the two colored
SEE LAW, PAGE 4
LOCAL
BUCK
HISTORY
Today: Law
Enforcement
Tuesday:
Business
SPORTS
JUNIOR COLLEGE
McCants, Felton, May take over in 2nd half to help
UNC gut out win against tall Huskies squad PAGE 12
BOG Chairman
Brad Wilson
said he thinks
freezing in-state
tuition will not
add stress to
nonresident hike
discussions.
rily obligated to keep nonresident
tuition near the average for compa
rable institutions.
Still, Farris said, “I think some
increase certainly will pass.”
Many campus officials, includ
ing UNC-Chapel Hill Chancellor
James Moeser, said the board takes
a risk by opting not to raise funds
through tuition hikes.
“They’ve closed off an option,”
he said, in reference to the freeze
on resident tuition. “I think it also
raises the possibility that the legis
lature will, in fact, raise tuition. I’m
SEE BOG, PAGE 4
jSShH & m B W
DTH FILE PHOTO
David Caldwell (left) and Paul Minor (third from left), two of the first black
officers in Chapel Hill, stand with the rest of the force in the early 19605,
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2005
BOG’s
choice
upsets
UNC
Flagships officials
fight for increases
BY LINDSAY MICHEL
AND EMILY STEEL
SENIOR WRITERS
Each of the 16 campuses in the
University system had 15 minutes
to make a case for tuition increas
es to the UNC-system Board of
Governors last week.
Officials from UNC-Chapel Hill
underscored the need to maintain
quality at the state’s flagship insti
tution, explaining that a S2OO
resident increase and a $950 non
resident increase would help to do
just that.
But the system’s governing
board made one decision for all of
the campuses. The board’s choice
to veto all requests to increase in
state tuition has left many UNC-
Chapel Hill officials at wits’ end.
“The challenges don’t go away
because of the tuition not being
passed,” said Richard “Stick”
Williams, chairman of the UNC
CH Board of Trustees. “We are
really going to have to determine
if there are any alternatives.”
The campus-based tuition
increase would have generated
a total of about $7.4 million to
fund top University priorities: 40
percent to fully cover need-based
financial aid and 60 percent to
retain the quality of the faculty
and to improve graduate teaching
assistant compensation.
Officials now are calling the
proposal to increase resident
tuition at UNC-CH “dead,” but the
possibility of hikes for out-of-state
students remains almost certain.
The Board of Governors has
until its March meeting to pass
campus-based tuition increases,
which will then go before the N.C.
General Assembly.
Without in-state tuition increas
es, the University would receive
about $2 million in tuition rev
enues, leaving about $1.2 million
for faculty and teaching assistant
priorities. Officials had called for
$5 million to meet those needs.
This is not the first time that
the University has ventured into
the coming year without an ideal
budget.
‘You never have all the money you
want or need,” said Nelson Schwab,
vice chairman of UNC-CH’s govern
ing board. You do the best you can
with what you have.”
Several officials at UNC-CH
SEE UNC, PAGE 4
WEATHER
TODAY Rain, H 56, L 45
TUESDAY Partly cloudy, H 68, L 45
WEDNESDAY Partly cloudy, H 66, L 33
    

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