North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 112, ISSUE 153
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DTH/JUSTIN SMITH
John Edwards (right) is introduced to a crowd at UNC School of Law on Friday afternoon. Edwards spoke about the importance of combating poverty in America.
EDWARDS AIMS
TO BRIDGE DIVIDE
BY LINDSAY MICHEL ASSISTANT UNIVERSITY EDITOR
Propelled by his undeniable charisma, one of UNC’s new
est and most famous professors navigated through a sea
of energetic students and faculty Friday afternoon, stop
ping to shake hands and exchange smiles.
More than 100 students convened at the UNC School of Law to meet
former N.C. senator and vice presidential candidate John Edwards.
Edwards who recently accepted a part-time, two-year faculty
position at UNC to lead the newly established Center on Poverty,
Work and Opportunity said he hopes students’ excitement will
drive them to action.
“Students have been very responsive, and it’s encouraging,” said
Edwards, who graduated from the law school in 1977. “But I want
them to get involved.”
During his address, Edwards shared stories of people he has met in
his travels individuals who have overcome poverty in America.
But, Edwards said, there are still many who haven’t experienced
similar successes, leaving much work to be done.
“The truth is, you have the ability to change this country,” he told
the students in attendance. “We have important work left to do.”
Provost Robert Shelton, who introduced Edwards at the event,
highlighted the need for community involvement.
Turnover of deans
emerges as a trend
BY RACHEL BROCK
STAFF WRITER
Joanne Marshall doesn’t regret
her decision to step down from one
of the University’s most prestigious
positions to pursue her true inter
ests research and teaching.
Last June, Marshall left the dean
ship of the School of Information
and Library Science, where she
worked almost five years and made
$149,714 during her final year, to
serve as a faculty member at the
school, earning $136,714.
She is not alone in her decision to
leave a high post at the University.
The resignation of deans has become
a common occurrence at UNC.
Since 2001, officials have replaced
nine of 15 deans, and a committee
now is in the midst of selecting anew
dean for the School of Journalism
and Mass Communication.
“I don’t think there is any one
ONLINE
Kiwanis Club serves up flapjacks
Event looks at civil rights actions
El Centro Latino takes on finances
Serving the students and the University comm unity since 1893
obf latlu (Tar Ueri
TAR HEEL HOMECOMING
Dr. William Roper gave up a
position as dean of UNC's School
of Public Health to lead the UNC
Health Care System. Dr. Barbara
Rimer took the post Roper vacated.
reason why so many have left,” said
Provost Robert Shelton, who is
responsible for hiring new deans.
Several factors, including the dif
ficulty of leadership positions, bud
get pressures and new job opportu
nities, lead to resignations, he said.
SEE DEANS, PAGE 4
Montessori school wants facilities
State places limits on Sudafed sales
Find more stories at www.dthonline.com.
www.dlhoiiline.com
“Republicans, Democrats,
Independents, they all
care about doing what’s
right for people.”
JOHN EDWARDS, FORMER U.S. SENATOR
“(Edwards) doesn’t want this to be a center
where a few faculty members sit around and
talk,” Shelton said during the reception. “He
wants the whole community to contribute.”
The many facets of poverty in America are
as varied and numerous as the 36 million
Americans who are poor, making it a difficult
poblem to combat, officials said.
An advisory committee of senior UNC faculty
members representing various departments will
aim to pinpoint a focus for the centers work.
“The kind of expertise that he will need
... rests in law but also in other departments
within the University,” Shelton said.
During his six years in the Senate, Edwards
worked to increase both the minimum wage and
the awareness of poverty in America experi-
SEE EDWARDS, PAGE 4
UNC ENDS AS RUNNERS-UP
BY MEAGHAN COLE
STAFF WRITER
Led by the work-horse efforts of its seniors, the
North Carolina track and field team lived up to
expectations for the ACC Indoor Championships
this weekend at Eddie Smith Field House.
The men finished third with 65 points, trailing
the close battle between Florida State (162.5) and
Clemson (160). The Tar Heel women finished second
with 100 points to first-year ACC competitor Miami
(138), after graduating key seniors that helped them
win the 2004 championship.
“Going into the meet if you were to score it on
paper, the women were second and the guys were
third, which is exactly what they did, so I’m pleased
with that,” said UNC coach Dennis Craddock.
Two record-breaking performances by UNC
seniors set the pace for the men’s team. Rob Bates
broke his own school record, winning the men’s hep
tathlon with 5,404 points to earn a provisional quali
fying mark for the NCAA Indoor Championships.
Vikas Gowda broke an 18-year old ACC shot put
record with his throw of 64 feet, 3 3/4 inches.
“I felt I was going to have a good meet,” Gowda
SEE TRACK, PAGE 4
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DTH/SARA LEWKOWICZ
North Carolina's Erin Donohue leads the pack at the track and field ACC Championships on
Saturday. The Tar Heel women took second place as Donohue triumphed in the 800 meter run.
INSIDE
KOREANITE 2005
KASA hosts night of Korean entertainment, complete
with tae kwon do, rap, karaoke and food PAGE 7
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2005
Tuition
doesn’t
reflect
true cost
BY KATHERINE EVANS
STAFF WRITER
As the threat of tuition hikes
looms on the horizon, nonresident
students are facing the prospect
of paying even more than what it
takes to educate them.
If the UNC-system Board of
Governors and the N.C. General
Assembly approve the proposed
$950 campus-based tuition increase
for out-of-state students, they will
pay up to $1,600 more than the esti
mated cost of education at a public
institution in the United States.
This cost, as estimated by the
National Association of College and
University Business Officers, hovers
around $15,626 per year.
Nonresidents at UNC-Chapel
Hill now pay $16,303, while resi
dents pay $3,205.
The association’s figure takes
into account not only what col
leges spend on instruction, but also
what students would have earned in
income if they were not in school.
SEE EDUCATION, PAGE 4
Top judicial
appointees
announced
BY KATIE HOFFMANN
STAFF WRITER
Junior Matt McDowell soon will
join the ranks of other past student
attorneys general including his
father, John McDowell, who served
in the office during the 1970-71
academic year.
“Not only did my dad pass along
his love for the University, but he
passed along his love for the honor
system as well,” McDowell said.
Student Body President Matt
Calabria announced the appoint
ment of McDowell and other top
officials Sunday night.
“I think (McDowell) brings a lot
of good ideas to the table,” Calabria
said. “One of his biggest strengths is
his experience and his know-how.
We really have a lot of faith in him.”
Pending approval from Student
Congress, McDowell will be inau
gurated April 5 along with next
SEE APPOINTMENTS, PAGE 4
WEATHER
TODAY P.M. showers, H 68 L 45
TUESDAY A.M. showers, H 63, L 43
WEDNESDAY A.M. showers, H 61, L 33
THE FIGURES
ON TUITION
Proposed hike
for out-of-state
students.
Current tuition
bill for a year
of nonresident
education, in
thousands of
dollars.
The actual cost
of a public
education,
in thousands
of dollars, as
estimated by a
national group.
lunior Matt
McDowell
will be student
attorney
general.
STUDENT
ATTORNEY
GENERAL:
The primary
duty of leaders
who take this
student post is
to oversee the
University's
honor system.
‘•4&I
    

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