North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 112, ISSUE 154
Board
shares
list of
wants
Carrboro’s goals’
feasibility ranges
BY RYAN C. TUCK
CITY EOITOR
Breadmen’s was the caterer, but
members of the Carrboro Board of
Aldermen gave the area’s legisla
tive representatives several things
to chew on Monday at a legislative
breakfast among the officials.
Municipalities meet annually
with their representatives in the
N.C. General Assembly to discuss
legislative requests that they hope
to see implemented, or at least dis
cussed, during that year’s session.
The aider
men presented
requests that
legislators
called feasible
increas
ing the town’s
motor vehicle
tax by $lO and
requesting that
the state ensure
adequate health
care funding
and some that
were labeled as
more idealistic
’HhBPP'' j
Carrboro Mayor
Mike Nelson
wants a $lO
hike in the
vehicle tax.
allowing citizens who are not nat
uralized to vote in local elections.
“I know it’s radical for the North
Carolina legislature, but we should
allow people of voting age in the
process,” Alderman John Herrera
said of the request to give more
voting rights to permanent resi
dents of legal age, even if they are
not naturalized citizens.
“There is a difference between
what the paper states and what
reality dictates,” he said of the cur
rent citizenship laws.
Herrera, who had to wait 10
years for his citizenship after mar
rying a U.S. citizen in 1988, lodged
the same request last year.
N.C. Sen. Ellie Kinnaird, D-
Orange, said it would take about
10 years to convert the idea into a
state constitutional amendment.
The town also is requesting
SEE CARRBORO, PAGE 10
TAR HEELS JUMP TO MLS
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DTH FILE PHOTO
North Carolina's Tim Merritt (10) was one of three Tar Heels taken in
the MLS Super Draft. He was drafted by D.C. United in the 4th round.
ONXiINE
Montessori school gets support for expansion
North Carolina aims to exert its electoral clout
Find these and more stories at www.dthonline.com.
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
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Easley solidifies
stance on education
TUITION must be affordable
for all UNC-system campuses.
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Gov. Mike Easley delivers his State of the State address to a joint session of the state legislature Monday night. The speech was the first of two he will deliver during his second term.
BY KAVITA PILLAI
ASSISTANT STATE & NATIONAL EDITOR
RALEIGH Mike Easley sought to
solidify his status as an education gover
nor as he addressed a joint session of the
General Assembly on Monday night.
Easley outlined his initiatives during
the first of two State of the State address
es he will give during his second term in
office, focusing most of his remarks on
how education can move North Carolina
into anew economic era.
“Together, we have faith that investing
in education will allow all of our people, in
every comer of every county of our state,
to fully develop their God-given talents,”
he said. “That is not just an economic
imperative, it is a moral imperative. It is
INSIDE
NEW BLOOD
Carolina Union Activites Board gets
leadership for coming year PAGE 2
www.dthQnlinB.com
a North Carolina value.”
Easley suggested significant reforms to
improve the high school graduation rate
and requested expansion of his Learn and
Earn program, which allows high school
students to earn two-year college degrees
or college credit for completing a five-year
high school program.
“We have great universities, great
community colleges, early childhood and
now great elementary schools,” he said.
“There is no excuse not to have great high
schools, too. The high schools we have
simply will not meet the demands of the
global economy.”
He also talked about creating “smaller
schools within schools” that will focus on
health sciences, biotechnology and other
BY BRANDON PARKER
SENIOR WRITER
He couldn’t bear to watch.
The frustration welled up inside of him
with each passing moment, and what
had begun as an exciting day filled with
promise was on the verge of ending in
grave disappointment.
One pick remained in the 2005 Major
League Soccer Super Draft, and Tim
Merritt had yet to hear his name called.
The fate of his lifelong dream to play
professional soccer now rested in the
hands of the final team on the clock
D.C. United.
When Merritt’s cell phone rang and
he saw that it was North Carolina head
coach Elmar Bolowich, he braced himself
for words of solace and encouragement.
Instead, he heard this:
“TIM-MY MER-RITT!” Clap, clap,
clap clap clap. “TIM-MY MER-RITT!”
Clap, clap, clap clap clap.
Bolowich, who was attending the draft
at the Baltimore Convention Center,
alerted his former player that the home
town crowd was showing approval for its
newest addition.
Merritt could not believe his ears, and
even when his name flashed across his
computer screen during the live online
draft coverage of the event, the moment
still seemed unreal. Confirmation came
as a phone call from D.C. United officials,
who were just as shocked that a player of
Merritt’s caliber still was available.
Even though it might have come much
later and in a more stressful manner than
expected, the dream was now a reality
SEE SOCCER, PAGE 10
K|
LOTTERY is not included in
Easley’s budget for the year.
growing industries.
Though Easley intends to continue
lobbying for a lottery, he said he will not
include an education lottery in his bud
get this year, and with the state facing a
potential billion dollar budget deficit, it is
unclear how his initiatives will be funded.
The governor credited fully funded
enrollment growth and affordable tuition
for the number of high school graduates
who go on to college. And Easley said he is
committed to maintaining that access.
“Tuition can’t rise every year,” he said,
adding that tuition increases at UNC
system schools will not be included in his
budget.
SEE STATE, PAGE 10
Nonresidents pay tab
when leaders cut funds
BY INDIA AUTRY
STAFF WRITER
Out-of-state students pay more than the cost of
attending the University, and the difference might
make up for reduced state funds, experts say.
INSIDE
Reports says
market-based
tuition is bad
for universities
PAGE 7
to raise that amount by $950. Resident students, in
comparison, pay $3,205, with the state legislature
picking up the rest of their tab.
Drug policy up for review
Athletic director
Dick Baddour
initiated review
of drug policy to
eye its efficacy.
INSIDE
COMING TO TERMS
Israeli-Palestinian panel discussion centers
on message of reconciliation, peace PAGE 7
HIGH SCHOOLS are in dire
need of reform across state.
The estimated cost of educa
tion at a U.S. public institution
is $15,626 each year, according
to the National Association of
College and University Business
Officers. Nonresident students at
UNC pay $16,303 in tuition, and
there is a proposal on the table
BY GEORGIA CHERRY
STAFF WRITER
Four football players have been arrested
and charged in marijuana-related inci
dents this year, spurring a wave of attention
toward the drug policy for UNC athletes.
But while administrators say they are
concerned by the arrests, that’s not why a
committee will meet next week to review
the six-year-old policy that dictates how
the University deals with drug use by its
athletes.
Sophomore football players Adarius
Bowman, Fred Sparkman and Isaiah “Puff”
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2005
Lt. Gov. Beverly Purdue and House Speaker
Jim Black applaud during the speech, which
took place in the N.C. Legislative Building.
But a tight state budget has led to cuts in funding
during recent years, and universities might be using
out-of-state tuition to supplement that loss, said
Jon Young, Fayetteville State University’s associate
vice chancellor for enrollment management.
“Out-of-state students are bearing a bigger bur
den of the cost than in-state students and the state
combined,” Young said.
The state’s commitment to providing an educa
tion for its residents produces a concern for keeping
resident, but not nonresident, tuition low, he said.
The elevated tuition is not a subsidy in the sense
that individual out-of-state payments are trans
ferred to in-state student accounts, but extra money
SEE NONRESIDENTS, PAGE 10
Thomas all were arrested Oct. 10, and fresh
man Terry Hunter was arrested Feb. 1.
Still, Director of Athletics Dick
Baddour said he initiated the review to
find out if the standing “two strikes, you’re
out” policy is an effective approach for his
department not to get rid of any suspi
cions of widespread drug use.
The evaluation has been a hot topic of
discussion among administrators, some of
whom say the drug problems of student
athletes are becoming more evident.
SEE DRUG POLICY, PAGE 10
WEATHER
TODAY Partly cloudy, H 65, L 41
WEDNESDAY Mostly sunny, H 56, L 33
THURSDAY A.M. wintry mix, H 44, L 28
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