North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 113, ISSUE 27
DTH FILE PHOTO/BRANDON SMITH
Molly Broad, president of the UNC system, speaks at a press conference
about her plans to retire by the close of the 2005-06 academic year.
BOG election
process fair,
senators say
Others call vote, withdrawals rigged
BY LAURA YOUNGS
SENIOR WRITER
Controversy about the N.C.
Senate’s election of UNC-system
leaders Wednesday won’t affect
voting down the hall on the same
issue, House leaders said.
The debate centers on a tiff
between Senate Republicans, who
say the elec
tions process
was rigged, and
Democrats who
say the system
functioned the
way it should.
Despite
the tensions,
Rep. Margaret
Dickson, D-
Cumberland,
chairwoman
of the House
Education
Subcommittee
I
Senate Majority
Leader Tony
Rand dismissed
criticism of the
ballot process.
on Universities, said the issues sur
rounding the Senate are not going
to affect House BOG elections.
“We don’t try to get into their
business, and they don’t try to get
into our business,” Dickson said.
Things heated up in the Senate
when Jeanne Lucas, a Durham
Democrat and co-chairwoman of
the Senate’s higher education com
mittee, announced that four of the
12 candidates for the board had
withdrawn without reason.
The Senate will chooses eight of
the 16 members being appointed to
the BOG this year, and the House
will choose the rest.
The candidates whose names
were withdrawn are Luther
Locals set sights on dreams
BY KATHRYN REED
STAFF WRITER
Rhesa Kallam’s children dream
in color.
A yellow lion, red flowers, a
beehive, a fish, a rainbow, a face
and stars decorate the blue pil
lowcase Kallam, her husband and
their two children painted as a
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DTH/PERRY MYRICK
Jackie Helvey looks at anew community art display at the Chapel Hill
Museum on Thursday. Art will be showing at eight locations until May 27.
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Serving the students and the University community since 1893
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Hodges, Michael Brader-
Araje, Robert Kennel and John
Spotswood, according to the N.C.
General Assembly clerk’s office.
Hodges, the only Republican on
the list, said he did not withdraw
nor hear about it until The Daily Tar
Heel contacted him Wednesday.
Sen. John Garwood, R-Wilkes
and co-chairman of the higher
education committee, called the
process rigged.
“We were given a ballot with 12
names on it, and four were marked
as having withdrawn,” he said.
“We were led to believe after
talking to a couple of (the can
didates) that they were removed
from the ballot by the Democratic
caucus. They told us they did not
request to be removed.”
Garwood said he was among
those who voted eight times for
Hodges in protest.
Lucas did not return repeated
calls by press time.
Sen. Edward Goodall, R-
Mecklenburg and a higher edu
cation committee member, said
the ballot should have been done
by cumulative voting. In that sys
tem, voters can cast ballots for one
candidate more than once, though
they don’t have to.
“If the majority party only offers
us eight candidates, then there is no
real election,” Goodall said.
Both Goodall and Garwood said
their criticism is not a reflection of
the candidates but of the process.
But Cumberland County
Democrat Tony Rand, the Senate
SEE BOG, PAGE 4
piece of public art.
They used a marshmallow-roast
ing stick and twine to hang the work
in an exhibit at the Chapel Hill
Museum, one of eight locations that
will showcase local artwork during
the next two months.
“It’s about as folksy as you can get,”
Pittsboro resident Kallam said of the
INSIDE
LIKE A REFUGEE
In midst of abortion battle, camp
highlights Africa genocide PAGE 7
www.dthonline.com
Search for leader to start
BROAD’S DEPARTURE CREATES A VACANCY THAT’S HARD TO FILL
BY KAVITA PILLAI
ASSISTANT STATE & NATIONAL EDITOR
UNC-system President Molly
Broad’s announcement that she will
retire next spring leaves the Board
of Governors with about a year to
determine who will take her place.
In response, board Chairman
Brad Wilson said he will begin to
put together a search committee
that will include a few members of
the board.
“That committee will come
together to decide a number of
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DTH/BRADY NASH
Abortion rights and anti-abortion activists show signs in Polk Place on Thursday. A display of graphic photographs prompted student protest.
Display sparks silent protest
BY RACHEL BROCK
STAFF WRITER
Two days of heated debate reached a head
Thursday when a procession of UNC students
turned their backs on a graphic anti-abortion
display.
The students led a five-minute silent protest in
response to the display, which was set up in Polk Place
on Wednesday and Thursday. The display juxtaposed
pictures of mass murder and lynchings with aborted
fetuses in order to make the point, supporters said, that
abortion is genocide.
Participants on both sides of the issue said their
painted pillowcase, which illustrates
the lyrics of a song about dreams she
wrote for her children.
“I think that part of the spirit of
the community is reflected through
its art,” she said.
Kallam’s family’s effort was part
of a Thursday reception and kick
off for the Chapel Hill Public Art
Commission’s second community
art project. The project is an exhi
bition of works submitted by the
public and centered on the theme
of artists’ dreams.
“We’re hoping it will become a
tradition,” said Erica Rothman,
chairwoman of the project, of the
community project.
“This is an opportunity for Chapel
Hill and Carrboro to show each
other who we are, what’s important
to us, how we interact as a commu
nity,” Rothman said at the reception,
which took place at the museum.
“To create a more livable com
munity: that’s the purpose of public
art.”
The kickoff allowed guests to
browse the eclectic array of artwork
and chat with some of the artists, all
SEE UNVEILING, PAGE 4
process issues,” he said. “And then
we will be about our work to iden
tify the best candidates in America
who are interested in being consid
ered for the presidency.”
He said he doesn’t know if the
board will be soliciting applications
using a search fund or just accept
ing them from those who come
forward. But the process likely will
involve a combination of both.
“This is one of the most presti
gious jobs in higher education in
America,” Wilson said. “I’m confi-
- THE BODY IS A BATTLEGROUND
Senate gives few clues
to its stance on lottery
BY AMY EAGLEBURGER
STAFF WRITER
Five years ago, Gov. Mike Easley
came to Raleigh with a mind to be
the “education governor.”
Armed with ideas for new pro
grams and with a focus on reform,
he sought to create an education
lottery to make his dream of a bet
ter school system a reality.
On Wednesday, after years of
deliberation and study, it looked
like his funding option just might
be realized.
The House passed a lottery by
the narrowest of margins only
two votes —but provided that all
important first step.
The lottery has been a hot-but
ton issue throughout this legisla
tive session. With a total of seven
different lottery bills introduced
in both chambers, the issue would
not be ignored.
But it has yet to be seen if the
second chamber of the General
Assembly will arrive at the same
INSIDE
WHO THE MAN NOW?
About 15 students show off their art after
being deemed worthy by judges PAGE 9
dent there will be plenty of willing
volunteers.”
Jeff Davies, UNC-system vice
president for finance, said Broad’s
replacement needs a basic under
standing of many issues, especially
those specific to the Tar Heel state.
One of Broad’s biggest chal
lenges has been the fact that she
is not a native North Carolinian.
She worked in the California State
University system before taking
her post at UNC.
“We are clearly operating in a
actions were meant to fuel debate.
“We’re just trying to help cre
ate a dialogue,” said Menaka
Kalaskar, former co-chair
woman of student government’s
Women’s Affairs Committee who
also helped organize the protest
against the display.
She said the anti-abortion
images exploited historic cases of
genocide, such as the Holocaust
and the 1990s genocide in
Rwanda that killed millions.
But Fletcher Armstrong, direc
tor of the California-based Center
for Bio-Ethical Reform’s southeast
region, said the display shows the
SB
verdict.
“I am hopeful
that it can pass,
but I think we
are all aware
in the Senate
how difficult
it was to put
together that
kind of major
ity,” said Sen.
Doug Berger,
D-Franklin.
The House
bill passed
State Sen.
Ellie Kinnaird
said she will
never vote for
the lottery bill.
Wednesday allocates monies to
building projects for schools,
scholarships for higher education
and funding for other educational
programs —a package Berger said
helped win over legislators.
But before any votes are cast,
the Senate will debate how exactly
it wants the bill to be worded. Sen.
Ellie Kinnaird, D-Orange, said
changes in the text are very likely.
Amy Fulk, spokeswoman for
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FRIDAY, APRIL 8, 2005
complex environment,” Davies
said. “And it takes an understand
ing of the North Carolina economy,
the commitment of the voters and
legislators to the university, and
the educational arena both locally
and nationally,” Davies said.
“President Broad’s job, as much
as she loves it, is probably one of
the most complicated jobs in North
Carolina.”
Several system leaders and leg-
SEE BROAD, PAGE 4
true facts about abortion.
He also said that while it isn’t
popular, it’s effective in answer
ing questions about abortion
and engaging the community in
debate. “We usually experience
opposition,” he said. “We recog
nize that we’re a counterculture.”
The center organizes similar
displays at other college campus
es and avenues across the coun
try. It brought a display to UNC
in 1991, Armstrong said.
“We like this campus because
there are a lot of people here open
SEE PROTEST, PAGE 4
Senate President Pro Tern Marc
Basnight, D-Dare, said he wants
to get the process started. “He does
plan to appoint a special committee
to look at the lottery sometime in
the next few days,” she said.
The Senate’s voting record on a
lottery does not offer any clues as
to how its members might swing
on this bill. Since 1983, the cham
ber has failed at least two and
passed three bills on the subject.
The timing of the House’s pas
sage of this bill is tied to the state’s
budget deficit, said Ferrel Guillory,
director of UNC-Chapel Hill’s
Program on Southern Politics,
Media and Public Life.
“Legislators have already asked
agencies, including the university,
to come up with budget-cutting
options, so legislators cannot
respond to all of the needs of the
state as they might want to with
available revenue,” he said, not-
SEE LOTTERY, PAGE 4
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