North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 113, ISSUE 34
A time for rebuilding
“The T has
contributed so
much — This
is something
the students
deserve to
have back.”
ELIZABETH SONNTAG.
FORMER CAMPUS Y LEADER
Locals gather to Chill
Is'lk v wßms M*
& 1 ' "■> r # W*
kii I 1
- I*JL - I hK L|i | JIB
Bp? • mBBk
; • ’ |§
fcs;v ’if IySR
jpshi
DTH/RICKY LEUNG
Erin Harrington, a member of the Triangle Youth Ballet, dances outside the group's booth at the 34th annual Apple Chill on Franklin Street on Sunday afternoon.
BY MEGHAN DAVIS staff writer
People turned out in droves to wander Franklin Street
on Sunday, but there wasn’t a bonfire in sight. Despite
law enforcement concerns about tussles that might be
sparked by such a large crowd, the 34th annual Apple
Chill festival brought thousands to downtown Chapel Hill to
shop, eat and bask in the spring sunshine.
On April 4, the downtown area saw the pinnacle of post-cham
pionship mayhem. In contrast, Sunday afternoon’s family-orient
ed crowd was subdued —and the town was happy to play host.
Black, others offer dark humor
BY BECCA MOORE
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR
A sold-out crowd was treated to
a high-energy show from stand-up
comedians Saturday night in the
Union Auditorium, led by UNC
alumnus Lewis Black.
The anticipated event of the
weeklong Carolina Comedy
Festival, “Lewis Black and Friends”
showcased some shining stars of
the comedic community.
Rory Albanese, a comedian and
writer for “The Daily Show,” kicked
the night off, complimenting the
University and then joking about
such staples as the swim test.
“It knocks the credibility of the
school a little bit, doesn’t it?” he
said.
His energetic stand-up style
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
ohr latht oar Mrrl
BY STEPHANIE NOVAK
STAFF WRITER
For almost 100 years, students
and faculty have passed through the
Campus Y.
The building in the heart of campus
has been part of the lives of some of the
University’s most influential movers
and shakers, including author Thomas
Wolfe. It also benefited the common
student as one of UNC’s main social
buildings —and, most recently, as a
mini mart.
The only thing that hasn’t changed is
the building itself, which has remained
THEATER SlflEW
CAROLINA COMEDY FESTIVAL
LEWIS BLACK AND FRIENDS
SATURDAY, APRIL 16
★ ★★★★
warmed up the capacity crowd as the
show downshifted into a more subdued
performance from Eric Drysdale, an
Emmy-award winning writer for” “The
Daily Show.”
Drysdale noted that his tour of
the town pretty much stopped with
University Massage, and then said of
Chapel Hill, “It’s not the hickest of hick
towns.” He held a brief arts and crafts
session that involved making paper lan
terns and tips on how to harass punk
SEE BLACK, PAGE 4
INSIDE
ALL THAT JAZZ
Hillsborough residents flock to second annual jazz
festival and put a little swing in their steps PAGE 7
www.dlhonline.com
the same since it was built in 1907.
But on Friday, students, faculty and
alumni came together to celebrate the
groundbreaking of renovations to the
building.
Several speakers highlighted the
Campus Y’s importance to the com
munity and expressed their happi
ness to see efforts to gain funds for
the renovation come to fruition.
In his speech, Chancellor James
Moeser referred to the Campus Y as a
sacred space that stores and transmits
culture.
“The Campus Y tells us who we
“I like it myself because it brings people downtown,” Frank Ryan,
owner of The Pita Pit, said of the event. “The dynamics are differ
ent, the crowds are different. The championship was crazy.”
The street was packed with merchants selling everything from
funnel cakes to homemade science project kits, performers of
all kinds showing off their talents and a variety of organizations
garnering support for their causes.
While many locals grew up going to Apple Chill, some
SEE APPLE CHILL, PAGE 4
■8
DTH/DAN BLUM
Comedian Lewis Black, a UNC graduate, performs Saturday
night in the marquee event of the Carolina Comedy Festival.
are,” he said.
Renovations to the building will
begin in May and are expected to
take a year.
Gaining permission and funding for
the building was not an easy venture.
“The odds ... were very much
stacked against this day,” said UNC
Provost Emeritus Dick Richardson.
When the Board of Trustees saw
the proposal for renovation in 1998,
it agreed to allow construction as long
as the $4.3 million needed came from
SEE CAMPUS Y, PAGE 4
SPORTS
TIE-UP
After two blowout losses to Miami, UNC finishes
third game in most frustrating result: A tie PAGE 16
v . |(|r ••*
." &&
3SS Mm i?aak
fl syp j
HH‘ WjgM <***< ifrlL W^rrf&
DTH/RICKY LEUNG
Chancellor James Moeser speaks to a crowd Friday afternoon at the
groundbreaking ceremony for renovations to the Campus Y building.
Diversity becomes key
in scholarship choices
BY CATHERINE ROBBS
STAFF WRITER
High test scores and a notable
class rank might not be enough to
snag a high-school student a merit
scholarship to UNC-Chapel Hill.
Not anymore, at least.
In addition to expanding its
pool of merit scholarships by 60
for the coming year, the University
is tweaking its criteria for such
honors. New guidelines would
put emphasis on SAT scores and
academic honors —but students’
outside-the-classroom acumen
will be important as well.
Mimicking the criteria the
University already uses when
deciding on admissions, new con-
TODAY Sunny, H 78, L 53
TUESDAY P.M. showers, H 82, L 58
WEDNESDAY Partly cloudy, H 80, L 57
MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2005
Blaze
leaves
room
ruined
Officials still don’t
know fire’s cause
BY KATIE HOFFMANN
STAFF WRITER
A fire broke out Friday morning
in 229 Ehringhaus Residence Hall,
destroying the room —and bring
ing the Department of Housing
and Residential Education under
fire itself.
No one was in the room when
the fire started, and no one was
injured. One member of the suite
was present, but she quickly evacu
ated after the fire alarm sounded.
The fire was contained to the
room, but smoke damaged the
other rooms in the suite.
“As soon as I stepped out of
my suite, I was shocked to see
this black wall of smoke abso
lutely pouring out of their suite
door,” said junior Jeff Alexander,
who lives on the second floor of
Ehringhaus.
The cause of the fire is still
uncertain, but some officials have
pointed to the possibility of faulty
electrical wiring in the building.
“The investigation is still under
way, but the suspicion is that it
was an electrical fire,” said Larry
Hicks, director of the Department
of Housing and Residential
Education.
The room sustained what Hicks
described as “a total loss.”
All eight suite members have
been relocated to different rooms
for the remainder of the semester
because of the damage.
“The stuffed animal that I’ve had
since I was 1 years old is gone,” said
Elizabeth Schillo, a resident of the
room. “Everything just burnt up.”
Schillo said there were two fires
in her room earlier this year at
separate times.
Investigations into a fire that
SEE FIRE, PAGE 4
Associate Dean
Jim Leloudis
touted the
educational
value of diverse
students at the
University.
siderations in doling out scholar
ships could include artistic and
athletic abilities, cultural iden
tity and diversity, and social back
ground.
“In the past, the academic
scholarships were strictly based
on test scores and class rank,
SEE SCHOLARSHIPS, PAGE 4
0
    

Page Text

This is the computer-generated OCR text representation of this newspaper page. It may be empty, if no text could be automatically recognized. This data is also available in Plain Text and XML formats.

Return to page view