North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 113, ISSUE 66
HOW TO HELP
FRACTURED RELIEF
ERIC JOHNSON
ASSISTANT STATE & NATIONAL EDITOR
Writer shares
story of trip
to Gulf Coast
Last Thursday, 1 met a man who
was sifting through the rubble of
his house, looking for family pho
tographs and pieces of a china set,
and the first thing he wanted to
talk about was basketball.
“A Tar Heel!” he said, looking
at my UNC hat. “Well, you can tell
them you were out in the middle
of a daggum disaster area, and you
found a Tar Heel fan.”
Then we joked about the fact
that Roy Williams, having lost
all of his starters, is facing quite a
rebuilding year.
It didn’t seem to trouble Tom
Ellis, standing in the middle of his
utterly destroyed neighborhood in
Waveland, Miss., that his entire
town was facing a monumental
rebuilding of its own.
He held up a painting of his
former home to show me how
the hurricane ripped out all of the
pine trees in the yard —much to
his glee —and left only the tower
ing oaks.
“That’s going to be gorgeous
whenever we get this lot cleaned
. up again,” he said, smiling.
I smiled with him, in awe of a
man who could look at his demol-
SEE TRIP, PAGE 6
DH .■ •.• | Tiff tlwßil
COURTESY OF CASTLE & COOKE INC.
A rendering of the Kannapolis worldwide center for biotechnology,
scheduled to be built during the next five years for S6OO million.
Man crosses U.S. to raise funds
BY SHANNAN BOWEN
SENIOR WRITER
John Buoniconti’s bookbag is
adorned with collector’s pins from
14 states and a weathered picture of
his parents on their wedding day.
The collage of souvenirs remind
Buoniconti, 30, of the journey he is
traveling —one that won’t stop until
his size 13s have made footprints in
each of the 48 contiguous states.
In three years, Buoniconti will
have walked 16,000 miles to raise a
goal of $5 million for uninsured and
under-insured cancer patients.
“We focus directly on getting
cancer patients treatments they
CORRECTION
Due to an editing error,
Monday’s front page story,
“Baristas battle for best brews,”
incorrectly identified the cam- j
pus-based The Daily Grind
Espresso Caff as being located
in Efiand.
The Daily Tar Heel apolo
gizes for the error.
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
She lailn ®ar MM
The Red Cross seeks volunteers and donations.
E-mail occhapnc@intrex.net for more info.
f—
•
COURTESY OF STOCKTON PERRY
(Above) A tent outside of Biloxi, Miss., issues encouragement to passersby. (Below) Spanky's Restaurant, on Franklin Street, held a
day-long fundraiser Monday for hurricane relief. The restaurant's goal was to raise $2,500 by the end of the night, including tips.
BY JENNY RUBY
ASSISTANT UNIVERSITY EDITOR
It’s been more than two weeks since
Hurricane Katrina left her mark on
the Gulf Coast.
Despite numerous meetings among stu
dent organization leaders, UNC-Chapel Hill
is struggling to coordinate its relief efforts.
“It’s been very ffactioned,” said Adrian
Broome, deputy student attorney general.
“So many different groups want to help in
so many different ways.”
Just days after learning of the destruc
tion on the Gulf Coast, more than 30 orga
nizations came together to collaborate in
Carolina Katrina Relief. Students went to
classrooms soliciting UNC-CH One Card
donations and set up areas in the Pit for cash
donations —with the overall goal of raising
$50,000 by Saturday. As of 5 p.m. Monday,
$11,425.97 has been accounted for.
But Erica Curry, vice president of UNC
CH Red Cross, said it is difficult to know
how much money truly has been collected.
She said almost 40 sheets with One
Card donations have npt been scanned yet
because there are not enough volunteers.
Rebecca Wolfe, a graduate student
in the chemistry department, said some
don’t even know that funds can be donat
ed through the UNC-CH Red Cross.
She said the Association of Chemistry
Graduate Students held a raffle and trivia
night Thursday and raised $3,000 for hur
MORE INFORMATION
available on the Internet
at TheßigWalk.org
or call (970) 490-1515
can’t afford,” he says. “Until the
health care system changes and
until the cure is found, people
need help today.”
You might notice him trekking
through the Tttangle this week. On
Sunday, he stopped in Durham after
a 12-mile walk from Mebane.
North Carolina is the 14th state
he’s reached, and he’s walked more
than 1,775 miles thus far.
Ollline | dttilyUirhwkHmi
A VIEW OF THE STARS UNC team
sees ray burst 13 billion light years away
PLANNING AHEAD Council asks state
to reprioritize transit planning criteria
OTHER BUSINESS Town Council mulls
affordable housing, environmental policy
| www.dailytarheel.com |
HURRICANE KATRINA | THE AFTERMATH
Pm rTjpa
DTH/ALISON YIN
ricane relief, intending to donate the money
directly to the American Red Cross.
Wolfe announced late Monday that the
association would give the money instead
to the campus wide relief effort after being
put into contact with Curry.
Last week, organization leaders discussed
the possibility of challenging alumni to
match the donations collected by students.
But plans have hit a standstill because
students have not received a formal go
ahead from the chancellor’s office or the
athletic department.
Research campus plans unveiled
BY STEPHEN MOORE
STAFF WRITER
KANNAPOLIS - Rising slowly
from his seat, David Murdock, 81,
stepped to the microphone and
gazed out at the immense crowd.
His wrinkled hands resting on
the edge of the lectern, he leaned
forward, smiled, and announced
the rebirth of a city.
Murdock, owner of Dole Food
Company Inc., unveiled his plan
Monday to partner with the UNC
system to make Kannapolis a
worldwide center for biotechnol
ogy.
The news comes two years after
But it’s more than a charitable
walk. For Buoniconti, the project,
called The Big Walk, fulfills a ded
ication to addressing the financial
struggles against a disease that
claimed the lives of several of his
family members.
When Buoniconti was 8 years
old, he lost his mother Gayle to
a 61/2-year battle against leuke
mia. Less than two years later, his
father, John, passed away as a result
of small-cell lung cancer. Later, he
learned that all of his father’s sib
lings have battled cancer.
SEE BIG JOHN, PAGE 7
*
The Center for Public Service has full listings
of ways to help online at: www.unc.edu/cps
“Really at this point everyone is kind of
on a holding pattern,” Broome said. “They
are concerned about alumni being asked
for money from all different directions.”
While UNC-CH continues working
toward unification, other nearby univer
sities have successfully coordinated their
efforts.
N.C. State University students formed
Compassion in Action and kicked off
fundraising efforts at their season-opening
SEE FUNDRAISING, PAGE 6
Pillowtex Corp. closed the doors on
its textile plant in the city, laying off
more than 4,000 workers.
Carlyle Rutledge, a 95-year-old
native of Kannapolis and a former
state representative and senator,
said he is excited at the prospect of
the new facility.
“I’ve seen some great things hap
pen in Kannapolis,” Rutledge said
as he toured the site, looking at the
diagrams of the future campus.
“This is a greater vision than I
ever dreamed to happen.”
Officials will spend between
S6OO million and S7OO million
building an N.C. Research Campus
Roberts confirmation begins
BY ERIN GIBSON
ASSISTANT STATE & NATIONAL EDITOR
There was nothing extraordi
nary about the first day of Senate
confirmation hearings for Judge
John Roberts, experts say.
The Senate Committee on the
Judiciary made opening statements
Monday in the hearings to deter
mine if Roberts will be the next
chief justice of the United States.
“Today was a totally unsurpris
ing day,” said William Marshall,
professor at the UNC School of
Law. “I think Roberts did a fairly
good job of presenting himself.”
campus | paged
THE HELP RETURNS
Medical officials from across
the state continue to donate
time and resources to Hurricane
Katrina relief. Several UNC
officials returned Saturday.
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2005
within the city in the next five years,
Murdock said.
When finished, the campus
will house more than one million
square feet of laboratory and office
space, in addition to 350,000
square feet of retail and com
mercial space and 700 residential
units.
The bulk of the money will come
from Murdock and Dole, but the
N.C. General Assembly also will be
contributing to the effort.
“The state legislature has com
mitted to fund us S6O million in
one-time funding to buy specialty
equipment,” said UNC-system
John Roberts
began his
hearings
Monday for the
U.S. Supreme
Court Chief
Justice position
Roberts reiterated to the senators
his commitment to interpret the
laws, not legislate from the bench.
“Judges and justices are ser
vants to the law, not the other way
around,” he said. “Judges are like
umpires they make sure every-
national | p*v4
A TIMELY NOD
President Bush's nomina
tion of an undersecretary for
public diplomacy and public
affairs comes as his domestic
approval ratings plummet.
FUNDRAISERS
$11,425.97 was raised
by the Katrina relief
committee as of Monday
Socks & underwear
The DTH will be
accepting these much
needed supplies in
Union Suite 2409
LOCAL EVENTS
On top of relief
Top of the Hill and
Kappa Kappa Gamma
to host fundraiser
100 Franklin St.
Give blood
The Red Cross and
Student Union board
will host an all-day drive
Hooker Center atrium
INSIDE TODAY
Homecoming
N.C. medical team
returns from service
in hurricane-affected
areas Page 3
Closer to home
N.C. prepares for
its own storm with
Katrina fresh in mind
ONLINE
MULTIMEDIA
For a photo slideshow of
the DTH's coverage from
Louisiana and Mississippi
visit dailytarheel.com
President Molly Broad.
Beyond the initial funding, the
state will give $25 million per year
in support of the universities’ work
at the complex, she said.
The UNC Institute for Excellence
in Nutrition will be established
by UNC-Chapel Hill to study the
impact of diet on the brain, obesity
and cancer.
“We’re hoping that this will be a
world-class research institute,” said
Steven Zeisel, professor of nutrition
at UNC-CH.
N.C. State University will con-
SEE KANNAPOLIS, PAGE 7
body plays by the rules.”
He said that he had no plat
form because he was not running
for political office but that he is
dedicated to fulfilling the position
of court justice to the best of his
ability.
“Judges are not politicians who
can promise to do certain things
in exchange for votes. I have no
agenda, but I have a commitment,”
he said.
“If I am confirmed I will be vigi
lant to protect the independence
SEE ROBERTS, PAGE 6
weather
Mostly Sunny
H 89, L 67
index
police log 2
calendar 2
crossword 7
; sports 11
edit 12
    

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