North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 113, ISSUE 68
Groups
stress
unity,
resolve
Kenan Stadium site
of large-scale effort
BY JENNY RUBY
ASSISTANT UNIVERSITY EDITOR
Two weeks ago, students decided
that the first home football game
of the season would be the perfect
opportunity to collect donations for
victims of Hurricane Katrina.
And now, their plans are coming
to fruition.
Student representatives of Carolina
Katrina Relief and John Blanchard,
senior associate director of athletics,
met Wednesday to discuss how they
could work together at Saturday’s
game against Wisconsin.
“We heard about this effort here,”
Blanchard said. “We just think it’s a
great idea.”
Blanchard said the Department of
Athletics is looking to recruit at least
40 student-athlete volunteers to col
lect donations at the entrances of
Kenan Stadium beginning at 5 p.m.
through the end of the first quarter.
And the athletics department is
turning to other student organiza
tions for guidance.
“I don’t think we’ll be able to get it
done without your help,” Blanchard
said. “We need your active participa
tion. We need your leadership to be
involved in training.”
The collaboration came a day
after athletics department officials
announced they would organize the
fundraiser themselves.
Erica Curry, vice president of the
UNC Red Cross, said she is glad to
see the partnership between the
groups.
“I wanted volunteers to feel like
they were part of the experience,”
she said.
While student government and
UNC Red Cross representatives aid
SEE PARTNERSHIP, PAGE 4
Opinion Editor justifies
firing of Tuesday columnist
Might as well get to the point: I
fired Jillian Bandes yesterday.
And not because I thought she
was a racist or an idiot. She is, in
fact, neither —and even if she
were, I wouldn’t have fired her for
those reasons.
I fired her because she strung
together quotes out of context. She
took sources’ words out of context.
She misled those sources when she
conducted interviews.
In other words, she conducted
journalistic malpractice, and that’s
simply not something I, or The
Daily Tar Heel, will tolerate.
By now, all of you have likely
read Bandes’ Hiesday column, “It’s
sad, but racial profiling is neces
sary for our safety.”
So you probably know that it’s a
fiery look at the practice of singling
out Arabs and Arab Americans for
examination at in public places.
And you know it begins with the
rather incendiary comment, “I want
all Arabs to be stripped naked and
cavity-searched if they get within
100 yards of an airport”
You also know it contains the
line “I want Arabs to get sexed up
like nothing else” in reference to
an Ann Coulter quote about going
through airport security.
Some of you called it racist.
Some of you called Bandes’ words
a fundamental breach of integrity
and journalistic standards. Some
online I dailytarheel.com
I PLEDGE ALLEGIANCE... District
Court says pledge can't be required, Rage 6
POSTERIZING ART Student Union
gallery showcases alum's work, Page 9
THE BLOGS Visit "Beyond Blue Heav
en" for discussion of Roberts' hearings
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
01tp Satin oar Brel
CLOSER TO HOME
IMSWE - -
WILMINGTON STAR-NEWS/PAUI STEPHEN
Progress Energy employees work to clear a fallen tree from Greenville Loop Road in Wilmington on Wednesday as Hurricane Ophelia
bears down on the coast. Flooding, power outages and property damage have all been caused by the storm, Gov. Mike Easley said.
BY MATTHEW BOWLES STAFF WRITER
With the fallout
from Hurricane
Katrina still satu
rating the minds
of many Americans, coastal North
Carolinians braced themselves
Wednesday to face the landfall of
Hurricane Ophelia.
A Category 1 hurricane, Ophelia
doesn’t pose the same threat as the
Category 4 storm that smashed the
Gulf Coast more than two weeks
ago. But local and state officials still
have scrambled to pursue the neces
sary safety precautions.
CHRIS COLETTA
OPINION EDITOR
of you called for my head, not to
mention hers.
But that’s not why Bandes got
fired. It happened because she lied
to her sources and readers.
Unlike two DTH alumni who
resigned from The Reidsville
Review this summer, Bandes didn’t
inaccurately quote anyone. (I have
her notes as proof.)
But you don’t necessarily have to
make things up to get them wrong
or to mislead the reader.
This is the bottom line: Bandes
told the three people quoted in her
column students Sherief Khaki
and Muhammad Salameh, as well
as professor Nasser Isleem that
she was writing an article about
Arab-American relations in a post
-9/11 world.
That’s not what happened; that’s
a major problem.
Racial profiling was, in fact,
part of their conversation. But it
wasn’t their entire conversation.
SEE FIRING, PAGE 4
campus | page 2
GOING SOUTH
By the time the Student
Academic Services facility
is completed, many campus
mainstays will have relocated
to South Campus.
www.dailytarheel.com
During a Wednesday afternoon press
conference, Gov. Mike Easley reiterated
the importance of following the evacuation
orders issued by coast officials and warned
of the potential problems caused by the
slow-moving hurricane.
“Let me be clear: Ophelia is a danger
ous storm that is already causing flooding,
power outages and property damage which
will continue over the next 24 to 36 hours,”
Easley said.
The governor already had activat
ed 350 N.C. National Guardsmen for
storm response, and Federal Emergency
Management Agency had sent 250 people
to assist with damage evaluation.
Though the storm was projected to
produce surges as high as 11 feet in some
places and flood the Pamlico Sound as late
as Wednesday evening, meteorologists saw
the storm drift northeast as the night pro-
Tuition talks lack specifics
Task force reviews price sensitivity
BY BRIAN HUDSON
UNIVERSITY EDITOR
The Tuition Advisory Task
Force came as close as it has to
discussing specific tuition propos
als Wednesday.
But, a week after their first
meeting, the group still is miles
away from hammering out its
final proposal to the chancellor,
leaders say.
Task force members were
briefed on a price-sensitivity study
conducted last year, which estab
Committee presses for response
BY STEPHEN MOORE
STAFF WRITER
In spite of repeated refusals to
answer any questions that might
eventually reach the U.S. Supreme
Court, Judge John Roberts was
pressed Wednesday on a multitude
of high-profile controversies still
raging in courts across the country.
From capital punishment to
affirmative action to the rights
of enemy combatants, Senate
judiciary committee members
continued to focus on topics that
Roberts deemed off limits.
Sen. Edward Kennedy, D-Mass.,
probed the nominee for a response
.
gressed.
According to information from the
National Weather Service around 11 p.m.,
Ophelia’s eyewall was moving east of the
coast, with many of the storm’s strongest
winds estimated around 78 mph not
expected to impact much of the coast.
But the state was ready Wednesday, as
increasingly darker predictions were issued
for the area.
By Wednesday morning, six counties
already had ordered mandatory evacua
tions, while voluntary evacuations were
issued for nine others, including New
Hanover County, which saw strong winds
and heavy rain before noon.
Dexter Hayes, public information officer
for the county’s Department of Emergency
Management, said Ophelia’s sluggish
SEE OPHELIA, PAGE 4
lishes market limits on campus
based tuition increases.
The study offered insights to
the task force about how high
tuition could be raised before pro
spective students are discouraged
from attending UNC.
The University has room
to increase in-state tuition for
undergraduates to the level of its
competitors without consequence,
according to the study.
But in light of the Board of
Trustees’ tuition philosophy
John Roberts
continued
to be grilled
on policy
issues during
Wednesday's
hearing.
about the constitutionality of affir
mative action, particularly in refer
ence to the 2003 Supreme Court
case of Grutter v. Bollinger.
In a 5-4 decision, the court
declared constitutional a form of
racial preferences at the University
of Michigan Law School that did
campus I page* 4
CALL TO ORDER
BSM President Brandon
Hodges says his group's work
is far from over. Attendance at
the first meetings indicates an
interest in his goal.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2005
which dictates that UNC in
state tuition be set at 25 percent
of peer institutions’ tuitions it is
not likely that drastic hikes would
pass.
“By definition I don’t think
we can be out of the range of our
competitive set,” Trustee Karol
Mason, a member of the task
force, said via telephone during
the meeting.
But Provost Robert Shelton, co
chairman of the task force, said it
is important for members of the
task force to be well-versed in all
SEE TASK FORCE, PAGE 4
not allow quotas but instead per
mitted race to be one of many fac
tors considered in applications.
“Do you agree then with Justice
O’Connor, writing for the major
ity that gave great weight to the
real-world impact of affirmative
policies in universities?” Kennedy
asked.
Roberts declined to go into
details of the case but said judges
should consider the ultimate effect
of their rulings.
“I can certainly say that I do
think that is the appropriate
SEE HEARINGS, PAGE 4
city | page 6
DISCUSSING ACTION
Orange County officials hold
another roundtable on
homelessness, this time
stressing the importance of
providing temporary homes.
HURRICANE
KATRINA:
THE AFTERMATH
HOW TO HELP
The Red Cross
seeks volunteers and
donations. E-mail
occhapnc@intrex.net
for more info.
The Center for
Public Service
has full listings of
ways to help online at
www.unc.edu/cps
FUNDRAISERS
$16,545 was raised
by the Katrina relief
committee as of 5 p.m.
Wednesday
Supplies fundraiser
The DTH will be in
the Pit from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. collecting new
socks and underwear;
We will also have a
drop-off box in Union
Suite 2409, where we
will collect supplies
before mailing them
off to areas in need
LOCAL EVENTS
Beads for the bayou
N.C. Hillel is selling
beads for $1
the Pit, Thursday
Pit donations
The Association for
India’s Development
will hold an all-day
food sale with proceeds
going to relief efforts
the Pit, Friday
ALSO TODAY
An exemption
Officials consider
waiving No Child Left
Behind requirements
for students affected by
the Katrina Page 4
Heading off
The Orange County
Democratic Party and
the Chapel Hill
children’s center
prepare a rig full of
supplies to leave for
affected areas today
Page 5
Cleaning up
As New Orleans slowly
reopens to residents
and business as usual,
city officials look to
reclaim the city’s health
standards Page 5
©
MULTIMEDIA
For a photo slideshow of
the DTH's coverage from
Louisiana and Mississippi
visit dailytarheel.com
weather
Partly Cloudy
V-r-A H 92, L 67
index
police log 2
calendar 2
crossword 11
sports 14
edit 16
    

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