North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 113, ISSUE 69
A GLOBAL OUTLOOK
BY BRIAN HUDSON
UNIVERSITY EDITOR
In the past Chancellor James Moeser
has used his State of the University
address to outline bold campus
based initiatives.
This year he set his sights outside
University borders.
About 400 members of the University
community packed into the Great Hall
of the Student Union on Thursday to
hear Moeser’s fifth annual address.
His message was simple: In light of
persistent changes in the global educa
tion market, the University must expand
its horizons to compete on a global
level.
In UNC’s endeavors, it also must act
as a leader, compelling the state to follow
its outward vision, he said.
“North Carolina must compete in this
global economy,” Moeser said. “So it is
absolutely critical that its flagship uni
versity be a player on the world stage.
We must be engaged internationally.”
And he said the groundwork already
has been laid.
The University’s current initiatives
and ongoing programs are set up to
empower North Carolina’s ability to
adapt to the 21st century.
“Our University is deeply engaged
in the issues that matter most to North
Carolinians: their health, their economy
and their education, both for themselves
and their children.”
Moeser announced the creation of a
panel that will explore ways in which
the University can make these contri
butions.
The Task Force on Engagement with
North Carolina will determine how the
University can best mobilize its resourc
es to further the state’s progress.
“Their recommendations should
reflect an understanding of the work
already underway (and) emphasize spe
cific strategies to improve these efforts.”
Moeser cited as an example of the
contributions a number of ongoing proj
ects including Carolina North, UNC’s
planned satellite research campus, and
the Global Education Center, now under
construction.
The task force will present its findings
in December, Moeser said, and meetings
SEE ADDRESS, PAGE 4
Ophelia still spins off coast
Officials say major effects have passed
BY SETH PEAVEY
STAFF WRITER
With Hurricane Ophelia slow
ly curving away from the Outer
Banks Thursday afternoon, North
Carolina seemed to have sustained
minimal damage, said state emer
gency officials.
The storm was downgraded to a
tropical storm Thursday night.
Though wind speeds reached
85 mph early in the day, the storm
was not expected to make landfall,
according to the National Weather
Service.
Instead, the Category 1 storm
pummeled eastern counties with
Kenan Stadium hosts magical nights
Heels went 3-0
at night last year
BY DANIEL MALLOY
SPORTS EDITOR
Last season it seemed like a
simple-enough formula for suc
cess: night game + Kenan Stadium
= North Carolina win.
It happened against Georgia
Tech. It happened against N.C.
State. And, most improbably, it
happened against then-No. 4
Miami.
CORRECTION
Due to a reporting error,
Thursday’s front-page story,
“Groups stress unity, resolve,”
incorrectly stated that the ath
letic department said officials
would collect funds for Katrina
relief exclusively. Student volun
teers will help the department.
The Daily Tar Heel apolo
gizes for the error.
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
She lailg (Bar llrrl
WM I
DTH/STEVE ANDRAWES
Chancellor James Moeser delivers his fifth annual State of the Univeristy address Thursday afternoon in the Great Hall of the
Student Union. Moeser stressed the need to become a player in global education and rolled out anew merit scholarship program.
FUNDING DRIVE LAUNCHED
BY KATIE HOFFMANN
ASSISTANT UNIVERSITY EDITOR
Although Chancellor James Moeser’s
State of the University address focused
on global outreach, he made sure the
importance of student needs was not
lost.
He launched an initiative to further
draw qualified students to campus.
Moeser announced Wednesday that
the University will launch a campaign
to raise S6O million for merit-based
scholarships.
Officials said the drive will help lure
the best and brightest students to attend
UNC.
“I think it will make a big difference
wind and rain, dumping upwards of
12 to 15-inches in parts of Brunswick
and New Hanover counties.
“We are very lucky that after
going north, it went northeast,” said
Jim Jones, a spokesman for the state
emergency response team.
Power outages peaked at 240,000
households overnight Wednesday,
but as of Thursday morning that
number was down to just fewer
than 80,000, Jones said.
“We’ve had minimal damages.
Things like shingles, vinyl sid
ing and also fences,” said Kelly
Nicholson, director of opera
tions for the Emerald Isle Office
There was a buzz in the stadi
um long before kickoff, students
turned out in full force and— in
the cases of the Wolfpack and the
Hurricanes
fans stormed
the field at the
end of dramatic
victories.
“There’s no
question in
my mind that
INSIDE
DTH sports
staff predicts
outcome of
Saturday's game
PAGE 9
the positive atmosphere and the
energy from the crowd had an
impact on the team’s performance,”
said Director of Athletics Dick
online I dailytarheel.com
DREAM COME TRUE Filmmakers set
to premiere film in Chapel Hill tonight
TO DELAY OR NOT? City schools
officials might delay school reform plans
NOT US, IT'S THEM Rep. Price blames
other states for N.C. environmental woes
www.dailyfarheel.com
in attracting high-ability students who
might go elsewhere,” said Shirley Ort,
director of scholarships and student aid.
Leaders said the campaign will cre
ate an endowment supporting more
than 600 new merit-based scholarships
bringing the total number of such
awards to 1,400.
The University already has received
$lO million to jump-start the campaign.
The funds came from the will of alumnus
Col. John Harvey Robinson, a career U.S.
Army officer from New York who received
his master’s degree from UNC in 1957
“There was clearly something special
about UNC that stuck with him,” said
Tom Heath, Robinson’s cousin, who rep-
qf Bluewater GMAC Real Estate,
which operates 675 rental proper
ties in Carteret County.
Official damage estimates are
not expected until Friday at the
earliest, and authorities still are
taking the storm seriously.
Jones said five swift-water rescue
teams were active along the coast,
and an additional 476 police were on
duty in the eastern part of the state
for traffic control and public safety.
Of the 60 shelters originally
opened statewide, 45 still were
open and housing about 2,000
people as of Thursday morning.
Mandatory evacuations were
declared in six counties, with vol-
SEE OPHELIA, PAGE 6
Baddour. “It created tremendous
excitement.”
And the new season, once again,
dawns with a 7 p.m. start Saturday
against Wisconsin, another chance
for the nighttime magic to con
tinue.
But after Saturday, night owls
might have to wait until next year
to cheer under the Kenan Stadium
lights.
North Carolina determines its
own start time only when a TV
station (usually an ESPN or ABC
SEE KENAN, PAGE 4
resented his family at the address.
Moeser said he expects this fund to
provide $500,000 annually for new
merit-based scholarships after one year
of investment.
Last year, all proceeds from the sale
of trademark-licensed products were
donated to scholarships and financial
aid, creating 55 new merit-based schol
arships this year.
Ort said she thinks a similar number of
merit-based scholarships will be created
this year as a result of the campaign.
Those awards are crucial to keeping
North Carolina’s brightest students in
SEE SCHOLARSHIPS, PAGE 4
ROBERTS
HEARINGS
Senate confirmation
hearings for John
Roberts continued all
day Thursday
page 4
PAGE 5
SPECIAL
Looking back
Saturday marks the
50th anniversary of
the day the first black
undergraduates began
classes at UNC.
And now?
Officials say that while
UNC has made strides
in improving diversity,
more has to be done.
State I page 3
A MOVING PROTEST
Anti-war protester Cindy
Sheehan stopped in Raleigh
last night as part of her
nationwide "Bring Them
Home Now Tour."
DTH editors right
to fire columnist
The question of why columnist
Jillian Bandes was fired from The
Daily Tar Heel has been addressed
already. I still believe that it is
necessary for me, the newspa
per-readership intermediary who
wasn’t close to the situation as it
developed, to answer it anew.
Jillian wasn’t let go because of her
stance in support of racial profiling.
For the record, DTH Editor Ryan
Tuck and Opinion Editor Chris
Coletta care a lot more about being
good journalists than getting across
their sociopolitical points of view.
They didn’t silence Jillian with
respect to her views. They penal
ized her with respect to her violat
ing standards that govern the DTH
newsroom. Yes, being fired is always
a harsh penalty. But in this case, it
will act as an absolutely necessary
disincentive for other staff mem
bers to engage in similar conduct.
I didn’t take part in the investi
gation of Jillian’s quotes, so I can
only accept the conclusions of the
people namely, ’Rick and Coletta
who did. I’m inclined to trust
their findings that Jillian gross
ly misrepresented her sources,
because I see no reason for them
to have been untruthful.
They might have wanted to quell
the controversy —but if they actu
ally intended to satisfy such an urge,
they likely would have done it by dis-
arts I page 3
ONE LONG SCRIPT
For the next two months,
the Wilson Library will be
home to a typed scroll of Jack
Kerouac's famous work
"On the Road."
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2005
HURRICANE
KATRINA:
THE AFTERMATH
HOWTO HELP
The Red Cross
seeks volunteers and
donations. E-mail
occhapnc@intrex.net
for more info.
The Center for
Public Service
has frill listings of
ways to help online at
www.unc.edu/cps
FUNDRAISERS
$17,538 was raised
by the Katrina relief
committee as of 5 p.m.
Thursday
Supplies fundraiser
The DTH will be in
the Pit from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. collecting new
socks and underw'ear;
We also have a drop
off box in Union Suite
2409, to collect sup
plies for areas in need
LOCAL EVENTS
liaising funds
Red Cross will collect
donations with Tar
Heel Sports Marketing
5-8 p.m., N.C. 54
Marriott
mm
MULTIMEDIA
For a photo slideshow of
the DTH's coverage from
Louisiana and Mississippi
visit dailytarheel.com
ELLIOTT DUBE
PUBLIC EDITOR
missing Jillian soon after the uproar
began to surround her column.
Instead, they waited to take any
action, and they spent a good part of
Wednesday checking the quotes after
the fact They examined one section
Jillian had written in particular:
“I want Arabs to get sexed up
like nothing else.
“And Arab students at UNC
don’t seem to think that’s such a
bad idea.”
Following these statements were
quotes by three separate sources. A
reasonable person could infer that
the “that’s” in the second sentence
refers to the getting “sexed up” in
the first. He or she also could infer
that the sources actually relayed a
belief that Arabs getting “sexed up”
wasn’t “such a bad idea” —and the
average reader would have no way
of knowing whether or not Jillian
actually shared the “sexed up” con
cept with her sources.
SEE CONTROVERSY, PAGE 6
weather
jdojTV PM T-Storms
H 92, L 67
index
police log 2
calendar 2
crossword 7
sports 9
edit 10
    

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