North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 113, ISSUE 70
Late orders up textbook prices
PROFESSORS’ TARDINESS
HINDERS BUY-BACK PROCESS
BY DON CAMPBELL
STAFF WRITER
Like drinking from the Old Well before
the first day of class, shelling out hundreds
of dollars for textbooks has become a rite of
passage on campus.
“I paid over S6OO (for books) this semes
ter,” said Will Rearick, a sophomore biology
major. “It’s pretty ridiculous. I guess it’s just
part of college.”
HURRICANE
KATRINA:
THE AFTERMATH
HOW TO HELP
The Red Cross
seeks volunteers and
donations. E-mail
occhapnc@intrex.net
for more info.
The Center for
Public Service
has full listings of
ways to help online at
www.unc.edu/cps.
FUNDRAISERS
$17,989 was raised
by the Katrina relief
committee as of 5 p.m.
Friday.
Supplies fundraiser
The DTH will be in
the Pit from 3 p.m. to
6 p.m. collecting new'
socks and underwear;
We also have a drop
off box in Union Suite
2409, to collect sup
plies for areas in need.
LOCAL EVENTS
Raising funds
Goldies will donate
half its proceeds to Red
Cross relief efforts
137 E. Franklin St.,
starting at 7 p.m.
rsj
mm
MULTIMEDIA
For a photo slideshow of
the DTH's coverage from
Louisiana and Mississippi
visit dailytarheel.com
Endorsements fuel campaigns
BY JAKE POTTER
STAFF WRITER
As municipal campaigns inch
closer to Election Day, some candi
dates are finding friends
. | MUNICIPAL
ELECTIONS
'3*2005
TODAY I HOW
CANDIDATES ARE
AFFECTED BY
ENDORSEMENTS
with benefits political
groups eager to endorse
candidates for office.
The first endorse
ments of the campaign
trail are already in:
Campus-based Students
for a Progressive Chapel
Hill announced last week they
are throwing their weight behind
Jason Baker, Will Raymond,
Laurin Easthom and incumbents
Mark Kleinschmidt and Mayor
online I dailytarheel.com
The Bullhorn Continue discussion of
Jillian Bandes' recent column here
A View from the Press Box Discuss
how Doug Justice's injury will affect the team
The Playlist Mad about last night's
Emmy winners? Talk about them here.
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
01tr la% 3ar Hrrl
The average college student pays about
S9OO for textbooks each year, according to
a 2004 survey conducted by the California
Public Interest Research Group.
Although they do not shoulder the blame
alone, professors who order their books late
drive up the cost for students, said Kelly
Hanner, the supply store manager for the
textbook department of Student Stores.
“With late orders for books, it’s a matter
FACING CRUNCH TIME
DTH/STEVE ANDRAWES
Freshman Ben Gellis (left) sells beads to Caroline Kennedy and her mother Carol for Hurricane Katrina relief at Tar Heel Town on
Saturday before the football game. Several students from the SUDAN group were raising money by selling beads for a dollar apiece.
On-campus relief efforts approach fundraising goals
BY JENNY RUBY
ASSISTANT UNIVERSITY EDITOR
UNC’s largest Hurricane Katrina
relief group wrapped up its
major fundraising campaign this
weekend, but it’s not yet clear whether
they reached their $50,000 goal.
Carolina Katrina Relief, a fundraising
group comprising multiple student orga
nizations, raised at least $25,000 during
its two week drive, but the total won’t be
official until later this week, leaders said
Sunday.
During the entire drive the group
raised $17,989 in One Card and cash
donations collected during classes and
in the Pit. And NC Hillel President Mark
Sussman said that after distributing
Kevin Foy for Chapel Hill seats.
And the N.C. Police Benevolent
Association also handed out
endorsements to Kleinschmidt
and former council
member Bill Thorpe.
Kleinschmidt, who
rode several endorse
ments into his first coun
cil term in 2001, said such
support carries a major
weight in towns with
intense political debate.
“(Endorsements) reinforce the
quality of the Town Council and
express confidence in candidates
to the community” he said.
For council members Bill Strom,
Blue Fusion
GIVE 'EM A GRADE
The multimedia section at
dailytarheel.com presents an
interactive presentation on
ranking UNC through several
different categories.
www.dailytarheel.com
of being able to buy back books from stu
dents at the end of semester,” she said.
“If we don’t have the orders in, we can’t
offer full buy-backs and students have to
buy new (books).”
The textbook department requests that
professors order their books for the fall semes
ter by the end of March and that spring orders
are submitted by the end of September.
Of 1,629 courses requiring textbooks
this semester, 1,321 had orders placed
after the March deadline —some as late as
September.
Hanner said an effective way to encour
age more timely orders would be for stu
Mardi Gras beads for donations all last
week they raised almost SB,OOO.
“I think the beads helped to represent
what our effort was about,” said Erica
Curry, vice president of the UNC Red
Cross. “It brought a lot of people together
as far as collecting the money goes.”
The drive culminated with a campus
wide donation collection that coincided
with Saturday’s home football game.
Student athletes and other volunteers
collected money at the gates of Kenan
Stadium during the game, the final tally
for which was not available Sunday.
Athletic department officials report
that a sellout crowd of 60,000 people
attended the game.
John Blanchard, senior associate athlet
Sally Greene, Cam Hill and Jim
Ward all winners in the 2003
elections endorsements might
have been key.
Strom and Greene both garnered
nine endorsements, while Ward
netted five and Hill received four.
No unsuccessful candidate had
more than three major endorse
ments.
Katrina Ryan, a Carrboro Board
of Aldermen hopeful, said endorse
ments can have abig impact among
less politically active residents.
“Endorsements, for the unedu
cated voter, tend to work pretty
SEE ENDORSEMENTS, PAGE 4
E3jLJ_3HHI
dents and colleagues to confront professors
individually. This pressure would likely cut
down on any late orders due to oversight or
forgetfulness, she said.
There are a wide range of reasons for pro
fessors to submit late orders, Hanner said.
Some tardiness easily could be avoided, but
professors often have legitimate reasons for
turning in orders late.
Cheryl Bolick, a professor in the school of
education, said she ordered late because she
was teaching anew course.
“I spent a lot of time reviewing the course,
SEE TEXTBOOKS, PAGE 4
ics director, said the Red Cross will count
the money from the game later this week.
He said those donations might not have
been as successful as they could have been
if the drive had been held earlier.
“We got a great response,” Blanchard
said. “But I think that if we had a home
game last week, we probably would have
raised more money.”
Curry said Carolina Katrina Relief will
its continue efforts. The group will meet
Wednesday to outline its next project.
“I don’t want to give anything away,”
Curry said. “But we’re going to talk about
big relief efforts.”
Blanchard said the athletics department
SEE DRIVE, PAGE 4
Editor: Its time we moved on
You all have heard about it by
now. Many of you have e-mailed,
called, blogged and discussed
Jillian Bandes’ now-infamous
column. My inbox is a veritable
mountain of letters and I have
been unable to attend class all
week because of the amount
of online feedback now well
more than 1,000 posts that
have needed to be moderated.
But this is the last time bar
ring breaking news, a letter and a
column today you will see any
mention of the column in this
newspaper. We will continue to
blog, as we invite you all to do,
but it’s time we move on.
City I page 5
SOMETUNEUPS
Thirteen of the oldest Chapel
Hill Transit buses have received
long overdue upgrades during
the next few weeks to help
improve fleet efficiency.
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2005
Victims
shelter
to close
Friday
BY ERIN GIBSON
ASSISTANT STATE & NATIONAL EDITOR
RALEIGH The Wake County
Hurricane Disaster Victims Center
in Raleigh is well on its way to meet
ing the goal set by President Bush
last week to have all evacuees out of
shelters by next month.
Of the 385 evacuees brought
to the shelter at the beginning of
September, only 181 remain. The
shelter will close Friday, but services
still will be available to everyone.
“Our goal here is not just to
make a temporary shelter a long
term option,” said Sharon Brown,
public information director of
Wake County. “We’ve now put into
high-gear helping them connect
with services and loved ones.”
As of Thursday, approximately
204 people had left the shelter to
reunite with family and friends
across the country, and Brown said
67 families left to establish a life in
North Carolina.
In addition to the almost 400
evacuees brought to Raleigh on
three planes, more than 400 evacu
ees from the Gulf Coast made their
way to Wake County on their own,
according to a Friday press release.
At least 160 of them used services at
the shelter to file disaster claims.
Jane Martin, communications
and marketing director of Wake
County Human Services, said there
were a few people who came to
the shelter to find their loved ones,
but that only two or three families
decided staying in North Carolina is
the best solution.
Martin said everyone is working
to make sure the people leaving the
SEE SHELTER, PAGE 4
r Fli 1
RYAN C. TUCK
EDITOR IN CHIEF
It’s time to get back to the news
happening all around us and the
wonderful stories and moments
out there to capture. It’s time to
get back to being a daily newspa
per or for the world to remem
ber that we publish one.
We’ve learned our lessons from
SpOrtS | page 9
DEDICATED FANBASE
Droves of Wisconsinites took
to Chapel Hill this weekend
for the Badgers' matchup
with UNC, dotting Kenan
Stadium bleachers with red.
Book orders
Of the 1,894 courses offered this fall,
1,321 had late orders placed for books.
• Timeliness
of book
orders
Nftml of
total comas
I No book* ontarvd
265 courses 14 percent
■ On time orders
308 courses 16 percent
late orders by course
212 courses in April 11 percent
299 courses in May 16 percent
294 courses In June 16 percent
308 courses in July 16 percent
195 courses in August 10 percent
13 courses in September 1 percent
SOURCE STUDENT STORES
DTH/FEILDING CAGE
the incident and it’s time to get
back to being the DTH.
Opinion Editor Chris Coletta
will not work for us for the next
week —a decision that reflects
our own culpability in the incident
and also serves as another tool to
help this circus cool down. I con
sidered a similar stepdown myself
but was rebuffed by the staff.
There’s a lot to say on the inci
dent. We could do interviews for
the next year on the issues central
to the entire series of events.
We have tried in the last week
and through a variety of media to
SEE LAST WORD, PAGE 4
weather
O Mostly Sunny
H 91, L 67
index
police log 2
calendar 2
crossword 4
edit 7
sports 10
    

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