North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 113, ISSUE 81
Carolina First amps up funding goal
ADMINISTRATORS SEEK ADDITIONAL S2OO MILLION
BY BRIAN HUDSON
UNIVERSITY EDITOR
In an effort to expand merit-based
scholarships and support faculty,
University leaders are extending their
goal for Carolina First to $2 billion.
Administrators say they opted
to expand the massive fundraising
campaign because of the momentum
already demonstrated to date. Almost
$1.6 billion had been raised by the end
of the September.
■ M 7 J jjjfc
DTH/GILLIAN BOLSOVER
Erskine Bowles lays out his vision for the UNC system Monday at the UNC General Administration Building after being sworn in as the system’s fourth
president. The only choice recommended by a Board of Governors' search committee, the one-time White House chief of staff will take office Jan. 1.
BOWLES USHERED IN
BY AMY EAGLEBURGER
ASSISTANT STATE & NATIONAL EDITOR
In a unanimous vote Monday by the Board of
Governors, UNC-Chapel Hill alumnus Erskine
Bowles was named the UNC system’s new presi
dent.
“I want you to know that you will never, ever see
someone who is more excited to be here than I am,”
Bowles said after the vote.
BOG Chairman Brad Wilson said that Bowles emerged
as the perfect candidate. He was the sole person nominat
ed by the board’s search committee, which interviewed
Flagship looks to plug holes
Pursues initiatives to
fill medical shortages
BY KAVITA PILLAI
STATE & NATIONAL EDITOR
UNC-Chapel Hill has a unique obliga
tion to meet the growing need for health
care professionals in North Carolina.
With three major schools for pharma
cists, nurses and dentists professions in
high demand across the state UNC-CH
officials are hoping to find ways to increase
capacity, attract more students or keep
those students in state after graduation.
The School of Dentistry is encourag
ing its graduates to work in under-served
areas of the state. Four counties in North
Carolina have no working dentists at all,
and the state ranks 47th in the nation for
CORRECTION
Due to an reporting error,
the photo cutline accompa
nying Monday’s front page
story, “A concert with more
than music,” misidenti
fies Luis Reveles as Louis
Reveles.
The Daily Tar Heel apolo
gizes for the error.
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
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The campaign, which funds a num
ber of University initiatives including
scholarships and faculty support, ini
tially set out to raise $l.B billion when
it was kicked off in 1999.
Leaders also extended the cam
paign’s deadline six months to
December 2007.
Matt Kupec, vice chancellor for
University advancement and the cam
paign’s public advocate, attributed the
success of the campaign to the quality
overall dentist population.
The school uses programs such as the
Board of Governors Dental Scholarship to
address the shortage. The scholarship loan
was amended this summer by the N.C.
General Assembly to require that recipi-
Carolina
fjfffHNTHE
INSTATE
TOMORROW
UNC and AHEC's work
to provide healthcare
across the state
dents each year, should be increased. The
dental school is hoping to increase enroll
ment by roughly 50 students by 2010.
“I think it should be increased proportion-
SEE SHORTAGES, PAGE 4
online I dftfl^rhet’tconi
AND STAY OUT Police issue warning
to area business on string of break-ins
GROWING PAINS Commissioners and
Hillsborough discuss the area growth plan
LESSON LEARNED County discusses
emergency response in light of hurricanes
www.daiiytarheel.com
of UNC.
“I think it’s a tribute to leadership
on campus, to the great volunteer lead
ers that we have, the wonderful prod
uct that we have,” Kupec said.
“It’s a campaign that continues to go
very strong. We are thrilled with the
results.”
Of the additional revenue, S7O mil
lion will fund scholarships, SIOO mil
lion is aimed at faculty support and the
rest is earmarked for special initiatives
five people. Some critics say the process
was less than extensive.
“The search committee was literally
bowled over,” Wilson joked.
“Given Erskine Bowles’ performance
in the interviews and his life experience
and his commitment and passion for
North Carolina, the choice was clear.”
But after the congratulatory speeches
end, the real work will begin.
On Jan. 1, Bowles will take the reins
from President Molly Broad, who has
led the 16-campus system through many
changes and challenges throughout her
eight-and-a-half year tenure. She will
take a position at the UNC-CH School
Health care needs
UNC is working to alleviate health
care shortages in North Carolina.
Dentistry
■ Four dentists to every 10,000
N.C. residents
■ N.C. ranked 47th in the nation
for overall dentist population
■ Four counties without dentists:
Camden, Gates, Graham, Hyde
Pharmacy
■ About nine pharmacists to every
10,000 N.C. residents in 2000
■ Camden is the only county
without a practicing pharmacist
SOURCE: DR. NONA BREELAND/CECiL G. SHEPS
CENTER FOR HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH
DTH/CALLIE MCLEAN
ents work in state for
four years within seven
years of graduation.
Thomas Luten,
director of student ser
vices at the dentistry
school, said the schol
arship, which is award
ed to about eight stu-
11
DAYS LEFT TO
REGISTER TO VOTE
for more information, see
www.co.orange.ne.us/elect/
within the University.
The expansion of the campaign
denotes a trend that many University
administrators nationwide have seen.
Top public universities (""re and
more are relying on private fundraising
to account for expansion and growth.
While the amount of state funds allot
ted to UNC has increased during the past
several years, it is not growing as fast as
the University, forcing administrators to
target new revenue sources.
“While the state appropriations
really are outstanding... we need these
private gifts to give us that margin of
of Government.
Broad said Monday that she still has
much to do before her term closes.
“I do have 90 some days left,” she said.
“And I intend to make use of every single
one of those days to tie up loose ends
and to bring projects to a place where I
can pass the baton and know that every
aspect of the university is strong and in
good health.”
Bowles also is looking for ways to
facilitate a smooth transition.
He said he will visit each of the cam
puses meeting with administrators, facul-
SEE BOWLES, PAGE 4
Hospitals across state
say leeches catching on
BY EMILY FISHER
STAFF WRITER
In laboratories across the nation, micro
surgeons are putting down their fancy
medical equipment for a simpler tool the
leech.
In the summer of 2004, the Food
and Drug Administration approved the
bloodsuckers for use as a medical device,
although they have been in demand in the
microsurgery field for several decades.
Dr. Scott Huffman, a microsurgeon at
UNC Hospitals, says his office uses a total
of 4 or 5 leeches per year, and typically for
the same kind of procedure.
Sitting in his Chapel Hill office, he
brought out several before-and-after pho
tos of a patient’s inflamed thigh injury, cov
state | page a
A BIT OF CLOSURE
Two years after UNC alumnus
Stephen Gates was killed in a
hit-and-run accident, the state
passes anew law on leaving
the scene of accidents.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2005
excellence,” Kupec said.
UNC’s decision to raise the Carolina
First benchmark raises it to the upper
cadre of university fundraisers.
Eight universities nationwide are
pursuing similarly large campaigns in
the last decade.
Duke University, one of those
schools, completed their multi-billion
dollar fundraising campaign in 2003.
Campaign for Duke raised $2.36 bil
lion during the course of seven years.
The campaign largely funded Duke
SEE CAROLINA FIRST, PAGE 5
Bush pick
surprises
analysts
BY JOHN WULSIN
STAFF WRITER
President Bush surprised experts Monday with his
nomination of virtually unknown Harriet Miers to
succeed retiring Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day
O’Connor.
The nomination came after much speculation about
whom the president would ultimately choose. Experts
said Miers, the White House counsel, was not one of the
expected choices.
Miers’ short public career makes her nomination
unprecedented, said Michael Gerhardt, professor of law
at UNC-Chapel Hill. “(Miers has) one of the thinnest
resumes we’ve ever seen.”
Miers has served as the White House counsel since
February. Previously, she worked for the White House as
the deputy chief of staff and assistant to the president.
She has also chaired the Texas Lottery Commission
for five years, practiced law with Locke, Purnell, Rain &
Harrell for 26 years and served as a member-at-large on
the Dallas City Council for two years.
Gerhardt added that the appointment is especially
unusual because Miers served as the president’s per
sonal lawyer in 1994. “It’s unusual for the president to
be so close to a nominee.”
Her short public career will make her confirmation
hearings heated from both sides of the aisle as senators
try to determine her position on controversial issues.
The Senate Judiciary Committee will soon lead the
effort to assess Miers’ qualifications. They will ask her
SEE NOMINATION, PAGE 5
Harriet Miers [jgsgn~ P
Supreme Court Justice Nominee Tfl
■ 1995-00 |
Commission chairwoman ’ ‘ ST
■ 2001-03 HWH
Served as White House staff
secretary n
■ 2003-05
Served as White House deputy chief of staff
■ Feb. 2005-present
Serves as White House counsel
SOURCE: WWW.WHITEHOUSE.GOV DTH/ELEANOR GOULD
ered by a four-inch shiny black lump.
The man’s leg would have been ampu
tated without the leech, he says.
Used as a cure-all in Europe during the
early 19th century, leeches may be back in
vogue, but this time their scope is smaller;
they are used for reattaching mostly fin
gers, ears and what Huffman calls “flaps.”
Flaps are body parts that are moved to
another section of the body without closing
the arteries. When flap procedures began
in the 19705, doctors found that the best
way to decompress the veins of the relo
cated parts was to use a leech.
But not just any backyard or mountain
stream leech will do.
SEE LEECHES, PAGE 4
campus | page* 7
PROTECT YOURSELF
Campus officials distribute
information to students on
how to prevent viruses from
being downloaded in the
wake of recent attacks.
Matt Kupec
has confidence
that UNC can
raise more
money through
Carolina First.
weather
!% Partly Cloudy
H 83, L 62
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