North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 113, ISSUE 83
Organizers to drop 40K on performer
WORK TO FINALIZE RAPPER’S CONTRACT DETAILS
arilM WALSH
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR
As Homecoming draws near, nego
tiations continue about the performer
scheduled to appear as part of the
opening festivities.
Officials from the Carolina Union
Activities Board said Wednesday that
they are working out the details of
their agreement with hip-hop artist
Common, who is scheduled to per
State leans on
school for help
UNC fixture sees thousands each year
BY LINDSAY MICHEL
ASSISTANT UNIVERSITY EDITOR
Though he was well-versed in the
intricacies of criminal law, Albert
Coates found himself unfamiliar
with practical law enforcement.
So in 1931, Coates, a UNC law
professor, set out to establish a hub
for institutional knowledge and
instruction
that would
coalesce schol
arly research
into practice.
More than
70 years later,
what began as
the Institute of
Government
Carolina
frf? IN THE
.STATE)
TOMORROW
The Center for Public
Service aims to spark
state and global change
has become the largest university
based local government consult
ing, teaching and research orga
nization in the United States.
Today, the institute sponsors
more than 200 classes, seminars
and specialized conferences for
some 14,000 public officials each
year. The focus, to be sure, is on
North Carolina governments.
And the school’s Master of Public
Administration program— ranked
10th nationally in Public Affairs
School of Government
Working to improve local and state
government bodies through advising,
training and research
■ Offers more than 200 classes, seminars and
professional conferences.
■ Serves more than 14,000 public officials and
citizens.
a Provides learning space for 700 county and
municipal governments in North Carolina.
Masters of Public Administration
■ Serves up to 60 students per year.
■ Established in 1966.
SOURCE: SOG.UNC.EDU DTH/BOBBY SWEATT
WILLIAMS SHOULDERS HYPE
Ex-UNC standout hopes to resurrect woeful Hawks franchise
BY DEREK HOWLES
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
ATLANTA Being the second
pick in the NBA Draft carries a certain
amount of expectation.
Expectation of being the one to help
rescue the Atlanta
Hawks, a team that
less than a decade
ago was among the
league’s best and
couldn’t have fall
en farther faster if
William Tecumseh
Sherman was in
charge.
Expectation of
being a future star for
a franchise that once
boasted of players
fg9
TOMORROW |
Rashad McCants
MINNESOTA
TIMBERWOLVES
such as Dominique and Dikembe, Spud
and Pistol Pete.
Expectation of being the man to pull
fans —and corporate sponsors back
SEE WILLIAMS, PAGE 9
CORRECTION
Due to a reporting error, the
Wednesday front-page guest
column “'Ration an issue for
every student” incorrectly states
the amount of revenue UNC
receives each year from tuition
as $2.1 million. The amount
is $2lO million. The Daily Tar
Heel apologizes for the error.
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
3hc Sailu (Bar Heel
form Oct. 30.
The performance, to be held in
Memorial Hall, is being sponsored by
the Carolina Athletic Association and
CUAB. Tickets are scheduled to go on
sale early next week.
CUAB president Jonathon Benson
said Common’s artist’s fee has been set
at $40,000. Details about his rider
—a list of requests that could mean
additional costs are being negoti
and Administration enrolls up
to 30 students each year.
Facts and figures aside, admin
istrators say that what sets the
school apart is its commitment to
establishing long-term relation
ships with the state’s government
officials which makes tackling
problems and improving govern
ments at all levels more effective.
“One of our core values is
responsiveness to the needs of
public officials,” said Mike Smith,
dean of the government school.
“What they know is that we’re
going to respond that our mis
sion is to help them out.”
“Not only do we get to know
what their issues are, but they
know that over time we’re going
to partner with them to address
those issues,” he added.
Always there
In 2001, the institute became the
school, which comprises the insti
tute and the masters program.
While its faculty members pro
vide expert opinions and advice,
the school stands as a nonpartisan,
nonadvocacy consulting body.
“We are here with the time and
inclination to do the reading and
the writing,” said Robert Joyce, a
professor in the school.
In the end, Joyce said, it is up
to the elected officials to apply the
theories and opinions.
“We are not advocates of any
course of action,” he said. “We are
advocates of good government.”
The approximately 50 faculty
members two-thirds of whom
hold law degrees are on call
SEE SCHOOL, PAGE 9
refill v
T. LEVETTE BAGWELUATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION
Ex-Tar Heel Marvin Williams practices with Atlanta Hawks teammate Josh Smith this July.
As the second pick in the 2005 NBA draft, Williams is expected to perform right away.
Ollline I daitytarheel.coni
FOR EVERY ACTION ... Chancellor
responds to SAW protesters' demands
WIKI, WIKI, WIKI Jimmy Wales, the
founder ofWikipedia.com, visits campus
WAGING ON Young professionals in
the Triangle battle the area's high wages
| www.dailytarheel.com |
ated, he said.
“We’re still trying to work it out,”
Benson said.
While Common’s artist fee is eight
times that of last year’s homecoming
performer, John Legend, ticket pric
es were announced Tuesday at sls a
piece only three times as much as
last year.
Legend was signed as a last-minute
replacement for Sister Hazel, an act
K— — -J - —T
DIH/LOGAN PRICE
Gov. Mike Easley hands Dell Inc. founder Michael Dell a plate with the state seal at the opening of the new Dell manufacturing plant.
SPECIAL DELIVERY
BY MEGAN MCSWAIN
AND MATT KNEPPER
With the rhythmic thumps of the
Winston-Salem State University drum
line in the background, the city hosted
Michael Dell, founder of Dell Inc., for the grand
opening of the company’s third and largest domes
tic manufacturing plant.
“Dell is the only leading computer company in the
United States that actually makes computers in the
United States,” Dell said at the opening.
Bringing the plant to the state was not a quick
process, so both company representatives and state
leaders were ecstatic about the grand opening.
9
DAYS LEFT TO
REGISTER TO VOTE
for more information, see
www.co.orange.nc.us/elect/
that fell through because organizers
could not cover the $28,000 cost of
bringing the band to campus.
CAA and CUAB paid $5,000 in
artist’s fees and around SIO,OOO for
production costs to bring Legend to
campus.
His impromptu performance
turned out to be a boon for the
University, however. Following his
performance here and the success of
Get Lifted, his major-label debut, in
December, Legend rose to national
prominence.
“This is my fifth year at the gover
nor’s office and I feel like I’ve spent
all five of them working on Dell,”
Gov. Mike Easley said.
Many of the community leaders
who were influential in locating the
plant in the state, including Easley,
Winston-Salem Mayor Allen Joines,
U.S. Rep. Virginia Foxx, R-N.C.,
and Winston-Salem Business Inc.
President Bob Leak were in atten
dance.
“Many, many people really played
a significant role in bringing us here
to this historic date,” said Ro Parra,
Dell’s Americas senior vice presi
dent.
SEE DELL, PAGE 9
WINSTON-SALEM
STAFF WRITERS
Revamped peer lists
could affect tuition
List helps determine
tuition, salary rates
BY STEPHEN MOORE
STAFF WRITER
Chancellors at UNC-system schools
are working with a Colorado consultant
to finalize anew list of peer universities
for the 16-campus system.
The new list might have particular
significance because of a proposal pre
sented to the system’s tuition policy
task force. If adopted, the policy could
set tuition rates at all system schools
based on average costs at comparable
institutions.
That proposal was not addressed
during last week’s meeting of the task
force because the suggested peer insti
tutes were made based on out-of-date
numbers, said Jeffrey Davies, the sys
tem’s vice president for finance.
dive I page 5-8
COMMUNITY ART
The Chapel Hill Public Art
Commission's "Sculpture
Visions" exhibit provides the
Chapel Hill landscape with
unique open-air pieces of art.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005
“With Common we feel we’re still
catching him at the same point as
John Legend,” Benson said. “He’s just
starting to get bigger.”
CAA and CUAB both have approved
SIO,OOO for the concert.
Anisa Mohanty, chairwoman of
the finance committee, said Student
Congress has appropriated $10,530
for the event.
Organizers plan to make up the
remaining cost with ticket sales at
SEE PERFORMER, PAGE 9
“One of the reasons that the board
postponed discussions is that our insti
tutions have changed dramatically
in the last four or five years,” he said.
“We’re now looking at an updated list
of peers.”
That updated list is being devel
oped by Dennis Jones, president of the
National Center for Higher Education
Management Systems.
Formal comparisons with other uni
versities are a way to check one’s status
within the world of higher education,
Jones said.
“It’s a way of saying, ‘Are we in the
ballpark or are we way out there?’”
An analysis of peer institutions is
used to set administrative salary rang
es at UNC-system schools, meaning an
updated list of peers could have impli
cations beyond tuition policy.
Salary ranges for the 2005-06 aca-
SEE PEERS, PAGE 9
campus I page 12 ;
COME AND SEE 'EM
The Daily Tar Heel will host
its formal elections forum to
night at 7 p.m. All candidates
for Chapel Hill and Carrboro
municipal offices will attend.
mEr"
\W I
Jonathon
Benson said
UNC would pay
$40,000 for
rapper Common
“If I had known
that this would
have put you
within 60
percent of your
customers, we
wouldn’t have
negotiated so
hard.”
MIKE EASLEY, GOVERNOR
weather
JfojV Showers
H 76, L 65
index
police log 2
calendar 2
crossword 6
sports 13
edit 14
    

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