North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 113, ISSUE 97
Miers removes name from table
BUSH NOW FORCED TO REDO
JUSTICE NOMINATION PROCESS
BY KRISTIN PRATT
STAFF WRITER
U.S. Supreme Court nominee
Harriet Miers turned in a letter of
withdrawal to President Bush on
Thursday morning, citing the issue
of executive privilege.
But experts said her withdrawal
was not unexpected as the flurry of
Dearmin
pushes
to please
students
Attempts to aid
several groups
BY STEPHANIE NEWTON
STAFF WRITER
Value-laden terms are tricky for
politicians.
Faced with the responsibility
of putting action to the intangible
nature of “student organization rela
tions,” as stated in Tuesday’s October
Report, Student Body President Seth
Dearmin relies on delegation.
“It has to be understood that I’m
not the person sitting back doing
every single one of these things,”
Dearmin said.
Having no
qualms with
being used
primarily as a
resource rather
than an enactor,
Dearmin remains
confident that
the students’ col-
Monday: 1
Dearmin made
any progress on
his town-related
platform points?
lective voice on issues such as the
accessibility of academic advising
will be heard.
“Conveying a frustration is start
ing a dialogue,” said Mark Laabs,
Dearmin’s chief of staff.
Away from academics, Dearmin
also touted a utopian platform
which sought to “catalyze a culture
of the arts at Carolina, comparable
in strength to our sports culture.”
The opening of Memorial Hall,
student performances through
Carolina Performs and the student
arts forum are all ways in which
the ideal has gained substance and
form.
“It’s the hardest platform point
to tangibly complete,” said Molly
Stapleton, chairwoman of the stu
dent government arts advocacy com
mittee. “But it’s the most successful
platform point we’ve completed.”
In attending the forum’s monthly
meetings and hosting the Carolina
Performs event, Dearmin is putting
a noticeable amount of energy into
the endeavor while also keeping due
distance, Stapleton said.
“We’re just trying to establish
where we stand in student govern
ment and set a mold for where we
would like to be in the future,” she
said.
“That’s really something more
for our committee to work on than
Seth.”
Other student leaders, however,
say they need more direction.
“So far this semester we haven’t
seen any strong initiatives or
attempts to communicate with
our organization or (Lesbian, Gay,
Bisexual, Transgender, Queer) stu
dents, faculty and staff” said Tommy
Rimbach, co-chairman of the Gay,
Lesbian, Bisexual Transgender-
Straight Alliance.
In his platform, Dearmin promised
SEE DEARMIN, PAGE 4
Online I dailytarheel.com
YOU'RE MOCKING ME Seventh graders
put on a mock trial in a Hillsborough school
FIRED UP Eighteen N.C. firefighters set
to receive $1.9 million in federal grants
TEACH HERE Gov. Mike Easley's plans to
address teaching shortages with pay raises
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
ohr latht oar Heel
criticism from conservatives and
interest groups, which they said was
surprising, increased.
“I don’t think anyone was shocked,”
said Trent England, a legal policy
analyst at the Heritage Foundation,
a conservative think tank.
“You know, there was widespread
speculation that was growing that
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DTH/RICKY LEUNG
After combing through some fresh produce at the farmers' market at the Rams Head plaza, freshman Laura Kurtz stops to
examine some pails of sunflowers Thursday afternoon. Kurtz was one of many students who attended this inaugural event.
MARKET PRODUCES
FRESH FARE
Rams Head plaza hosts first flower, vegetable sale
BY KATHRYN ROWLAND STAFF WRITER
A healthy dose of sunshine and free
samples contributed to a fall atmo
sphere Thursday for the first-ever
farmers’ market on campus.
From 2 p.m. to 8 p.m., the Rams Head
plaza was transformed into a tabled array of
fresh fruits and vegetables, hot apple cider
and pumpkin pies. Easy recipe fliers featur
ing each item on sale also were available.
“There’s something for everyone,” said
Jen Ketterly, the nutrition and fitness coor
dinator at the Center for Healthy Student
WHY DID YOU VOTE?
“In local
elections you have
a better chance of
getting your
voice heard.”
Vote early at Morehead Planetarium and Science Center through
Nov. 5, Monday to Friday: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturdays: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
arts I page 2
MUSIC IN THE AIR
Members of the music
department gear up for their
first performance in
Memorial Hall since its
expansive renovation.
www.dailytarheeLconi
this process would end in with
drawal.”
In her letter, Miers states,
“Protection of the prerogatives of
the Executive Branch and continued
pursuit of my confirmation are in
tension. I have decided that seeking
my confirmation should yield.”
England said criticism Miers was
receiving from all sides of the aisle,
and from Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa.,
about keeping executive branch doc
uments confidential and privileged,
motivated her decision.
Katie
Huffman
Sophomore,
History
I
Bfj&-
“Myfriend’s
morn is running
for alderman, so I
promised her
I’d vote.”
Jesse Choper, a professor of
public law at the University of
Califomia-Berkeley, said he sees her
withdrawal as an accumulation of
various disapproval and the privacy
issue. But he added that he does not
believe executive privilege was the
defining issue.
“(President Bush) gained nothing
out of this at all,” he said. “This was
not a strong nomination to begin
with.”
SEE MIERS, PAGE 4
Behaviors.
The center collaborated with
Carolina Dining Services and stu
dent government to promote the
event.
Ketterly said the market was
designed as a fun way to motivate
students to eat more healthy foods
as part of the Healthy Campus
2010 national campaign.
To make it easier for students
to buy items, payment options
included cash, flex and expense
dollars.
Freshman Caroline McMillan
used her One Card to purchase
fresh bread and a pumpkin pie.
Candidates mull downtown
Thomas
Engelman
Senior,
Political
Science
Carrboro faces
future questions
BY MEGHAN DAVIS
ASSISTANT CITY EDITOR
Carrboro is not a big place.
With about 17,000 residents
spread through a few dozen square
miles, Carrboro doesn’t have a lot
of room to work with.
And most agree a small area
needs a downtown designed to
scale accessible at street-level,
walkable, full of life.
When the next mayor and Board
of Aldermen are elected Nov. 8,
debate will continue on the best
approach to keep Carrboro’s down-
university | page 4
A COMMON CAUSE
Members of the Muslim
Students Association are
joined by other students in a
fast-a-thon to raise both
funds and awareness.
Harriet Miers
withdrew her
name for justice,
citing executive
privilege.
“It’s nice because it’s not really
coming out of my pocket,” she
said. “I think (the market is) really
cute. It helps get you in the mood
for fall.”
Ketterly said one fun feature
was the pumpkin-carving kits on
sale to students. Anyone can bring
a carved pumpkin to Chase Dining
Hall at Rams Head by Oct. 31, and
the most creative carver will win a
new bike, sponsored by CDS.
Student Body President Seth
Dearmin said he was excited to
see one of his platform ideas come
SEE MARKET, PAGE 4
. | MUNICIPAL
Issue Spotlight
WIRELESS IN
CHAPEL HILL
Monday: What
candidates are
touting for a
wireless plan
downtown
and beyond
town viable but unpretentious.
The town has several documents
guiding future development the
Vision 2020 plan calls for doubling
commercial space downtown,
and the New Vision plan stresses
human-scale, mixed-use areas.
Meeting both aesthetic and
commercial goals could prove to
be an integral balancing act for the
aldermen in the coming years.
Carrboro’s history as a free-spir
ited village around the comer from
sports | page 9
DOWN. SET. EAT.
Local restaurants see a rise in
calls for delivery food during
Tar Heel football away games
and notice an increase in
dining out after victories.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2005
Leaders
mum on
speaker
selection
Decision still rests
in Moeser s hands
BY iENNY RUBY
ASSISTANT UNIVERSITY EDITOR
The selection for the 2006 spring
Commencement speaker continues to
be a mystery.
Although recommendations were
sent to Chancellor James Moeser this
summer, no word has been released
whether any invitation has been
accepted or even extended.
“We’re not ready to make an
announcement yet,” said Executive
Associate Provost Steve Allred, who
is chairman of the Commencement
speaker advisory committee.
The committee composed of four
faculty and four students has been
working since last semester soliciting
information and discussing potential
candidates.
And Allred said between eight and
10 recommendations were submitted
to Moeser.
“I’m confident we’ll have a decision
ready to announce by the end of the
semester,” he said.
But Senior Class President Bobby
Whisnant said the chosen speaker
might not be anyone from the com
mittee’s list.
“Honestly, if the Chancellor doesn’t
like anyone on the list, then it doesn’t
matter how many people we submit,”
Whisnant said. “Ultimately, it is his
decision.”
Last year’s speaker, Rev. Peter
Gomes was not the committee’s top
recommendation, Allred said.
“(He) gave the best Commencement
speech we’ve had in years,” he said.
The selection of Gomes was
released in early September, shortly
after the announcement for the 2004
December Commencement speaker.
And when Whisnant told The
Daily Tar Heel on Sept. 27 that Etta
Pisano would be this year’s December
Commencement speaker, many
expected the release of a spring
speaker’s name shortly thereafter.
“I know a lot of students are getting
antsy,” Whisnant said.
But despite the sealed lips of the
administration, committee members
said they are not worried.
“We’re in great shape,” Student
Body President Seth Dearmin said.
“I would be remiss to say this is a bad
situation.”
Committee members discussed
potential candidates from a wide array
of specialties including arts, enter
tainment, science and literature.
The Commencement speaker
receives an honorary degree from
UNC-Chapel Hill and is expected to
SEE SPEAKER , PAGE 4
the University makes the thought
of dictating exactly what can go
downtown seem overwrought to
many in the town.
“The diversity of this downtown
came about without (businesses’)
requirement to go through a very
long, complicated approval pro
cess,” said James Carnahan, chair
man of the town’s planning board.
Katrina Ryan, an alderman
candidate, said the town needs
to think hard about what should
happen next in downtown.
“We definitely don’t want a Wal-
Mart, but we do need a place to buy
basic necessities,” Ryan said.
In keeping with the desire to
SEE DOWNTOWN, PAGE 4
weather
i?*-. Partly Cloudy
H 57, L 33
index
police log 2
calendar 2
crossword 6
sports 9
edit 10
    

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