North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 113, ISSUE 99
6 p.m.
The scene at Sutton’s Drug Store was one of preparatory calm
Monday evening. Banter drifted back and forth among staff and
patrons in the establishment, which was staying open until 11
p.m. to serve costumed revelers.
Mike Kertcher and Chris Johnson, waiters at Sutton’s, watched
as Dimas Reyes, the head cook, or according to Kertcher, “King
of the Grill,” did impressions.
And at the front of the store, owner Don Pinney was watching
the street, anxious for the night to start.
“Anticipation,” he sang. “I love it!”
In the back, four friends, in for their first Halloween on
Franklin Street, chowed down on hot dogs, french fries, cheese
fries and chili cheese fries. “It reminds you so much of back
home, the country,” Donald Wiler said.
The staff expected a big draw to Sutton’s favorites: burgers
and shakes. “So far, it’s been kind of steady, but I guess before
we shut down it’ll get kind of crazy,” said Johnson from below
his “The Rock” mask.
“Otherwise, we’re just kind of laughing and having a good
time.”
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DTH PHOTOS/IARRY BAUM AND LOGAN PRICE
(Lett photo) Sutton s employee Angelica Garcia talks to co-workers. (Center photo) Wake Technical Community College freshman Mark Oniffrey (left) tries on a costume. (Right photo) Dale May removes a street barricade.
Dearmin aims
to better talks
BY BRIAN HUDSON
UNIVERSITY EDITOR
The student body president’s
role in dealing with administra
tion is simple at first glance.
Talk to students. Convey their
message.
But the intricacies
of the task are myr
iad student body
presidents must rep
resent the opinions of
26,000.
Although adminis
trators are receptive
to the student voice,
Student Body President
What
issues is Dearmin
looking to tackle
during the second
half of his term?
Seth Dearmin says he has found
it difficult to encourage partici
pation by the student body en
masse despite attempts by his
cabinet and him.
“I think on the whole, all par
ties have been disappointed with
the feedback we’ve been getting,”
he said. “And it’s not for lack of
trying.”
Instead, he has relied on infor
mal means word of mouth
in tackling the dozen or so points
in his platform directly dealing
with University administrators
and the Board of Trustees.
CORRECTION
Due to a reporting error,
Thursday’s front page story,
“Several points not included
in October Report,” incor
rectly states that Student
Body President Seth Dearmin
did not include four platform
planks that he in fact did in
the October Report.
The Daily Tar Heel apolo
gizes for the error.
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
She Daily alar Mrrl
When on the campaign trail
in February, Dearmin promised
to foster a stronger connection
between the University’s govern
ing board and the student body.
His platform touted a number
of generalized points, such as a
promise to better publi
cize trustee meetings.
Although not visible,
he said his informal
meetings with students
and trustees are help
ing to complete these
goals.
During formal din
ners, phone calls and
even football games, he talks
with trustees about student
issues, he said. “There’s a ton of
different events where I have a
chance for interaction.”
He said that informal method
is more effective than overt and
publicly vocal statements.
“You don’t go into a meeting
and blow up and make a big
scene and hope that will make a
difference.”
Student Body Vice President
Adrian Johnston said Dearmin
SEE OUTREACH, PAGE 5 *
online j dai M&rhwl.corin
I DON'T THINK SO Sen. Dole fights
back against impending job training cuts
PUMPING BACKUP General Assembly
Republicans ask for another special session
U IN? mtvU, a channel surging in
popularity, targets UNC as possible site
www.dailytarheei.cozn
7 p.m.
“I’m a long-armed man, and this kimono was designed for a
woman,” remarked UNC freshman Davis Bennett as he fixed his
costume around 7 p.m. Monday. “I have to put on tape. It makes
it look like I was fighting.”
Bennett, joined by a few of his high schools friends in Stacy
Residence Hall, had one main goal in mind: to get to Franklin
Street. The Chapel Hill High School graduate dressed up as an
“Office Samurai” complete with a white collar, tie and printed
kimono. He was preparing for his first Halloween as a UNC
undergraduate on Franklin Street.
All together, his group also consisted of a vampire, a ghost
buster and a man wearing a kilt.
“We are going out to find the children who live in our hearts,”
Bennett said.
Freshman Josh Lassiter chimed in, “The ones who live deep in
our bosoms.” The guys did not know how long they planned to be
out, noting that they had cast time aside for a long night.
“I’m excited and interested to see the different costumes
tonight,” said Bennett.
“I’m hoping to see some action as well.”
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CAMPUS READY FOR ROUND 2
BY ERIN ZUREICK
STAFF WRITER
Two weeks after a failed spe
cial election, the UNC Board of
Elections is taking steps to ensure
that today’s Homecoming Election,
does not see the same problems.
The Oct. 18 election to fill seats in
Student Congress saw technical dif
ficulties, campaign violations and an
illegal seat on the ballot, all of which
led the elections board to nullify
results and hold a re-election.
Nine candidates are vying for
Downtown growth
at core of campaign
BY JAKE POTTER
ASSISTANT CITY EDITOR
For some in Chapel Hill, the
sky’s the limit when it comes to
commercial and residential devel
opment downtown.
But for others, the concept of
“too much of a good thing” can be
applied to the area just as easily.
Where to draw the line has
proved to be a point of conten
tion in this year’s Chapel Hill
Town Council race. Candidates
have split along hot-button issues
ranging from community-oriented
development to maintaining the
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four seats two are up for grabs
in District 6, one in District 3 and
one in District 2.
The re-election coincides with
today’s regularly scheduled elec
tion in which students can vote
for Homecoming candidates and
seniors can vote for their class gift.
Students can cast a ballot at Student
Central from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Those voting on Student
Central during the Oct. 18 election
received error messages through
out the day. And off-campus stu-
| MUNICIPAL Wednesday:
jA ELECTIONS Candidates
s?"* 2005 debate on plans
Issue Spotlight for UNC's
DOWNTOWN proposed
DEVELOPMENT satellite campus
peace along Chapel Hill’s main
commercial thoroughfares.
Council hopeful Laurin Easthom
is optimistic about a growing trend
of residential and mixed-use
development along Franklin and
Rosemary streets designed to bring
SEE DEVELOPMENT, PAGE 4
campus I page 2
GET OUT THE BOXES
Baity Hill residents, displaced
since August from their
would-be homes at Cobb
Residence Hall, begin to move
in to Cobb today.
Seen and
heard on
Franklin
Street
Halloween on Franklin Street is an experience dif
ficult to describe succinctly. A veritable rockfest; a
rollicking scene reminiscent of a tame Rob Zombie
video; a party without rival. This year’s celebration didn’t
appear on its way to discounting that reputation.
Police again expected some 70,000 revelers to take to
Franklin Street until the wee Tuesday morning hours. The
Daily Tar Heel caught up with several participants along
their ride through a Halloween in Chapel Hill.
MORE HALLOWEEN DIARIES ON PAGE 5
7:15 p.m.
In the parking lot next to Hill Hall, Orange County emergency
management officials prepared for the night in their own way as
they set up communications centers.
“I like the atmosphere of the people in Chapel Hill, and I like
helping people,” said Mark Weaver of the Orange County Rescue
Squad. “That’s why all of us do it.”
The lot was crammed with vehicles and personnel as first
responders from departments in several different counties pre
pared to watch over the night’s celebration.
The first issue was guiding Chatham County’s new mobile
command center being used for the first time in a non-drill
situation through the gates and into the lot. Once the vehicles
were parked, it was time to unload items and transport them into
Hill Hall to set up a triage center.
The buses would take over communications and coordinate
medical efforts between the site and a Rosemary Street site.
In the end, said Jack Ball, director of Orange County EMS, it
was just a matter of getting the logistics in place to help people.
“I think we’re getting it together,” he said. “It was a little tight
getting our equipment in and getting situated.”
dents, who vote in District 6, also
had difficulty voting due to coding
errors, said Jim Brewer, vice chair
man of the board.
Brewer said the board conduct
ed practice elections online Friday
and Monday to help work out the
kinks in the system.
With the exception of a few
minor glitches, the tests have run
smoothly, he said.
“The board doesn’t really have
control over whether technical
problems arise,” he said. “Once they
WHY DID YOU VOTE EARLY?
9
Sam
Dolbee
Soph,
InternatT
Studies
Major
“Voting is important
because (politicians)
are making policies
that mil affect my life.”
Vote early at Morehead Planetarium and Science Center through
Nov. 5, Monday to Friday: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturdays: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
arts I pa#e 7
PRIME TIME PERFORMER
Senegal's Youssou N'Dour, a
2005 Grammy award winner
who has put out 20 albums
since 1986, performs at
Memorial Hall today at 8 p.m.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2005
30,000 on Franklin
St. as of 10 p.m.
1 arrested as of
10 p.m. on Franklin St.
4 taken to EMS for
alcohol overdoses as of
10 p.m. on Franklin St.
do arise, it’s a matter of dealing with
them as quickly as possible.”
Brewer said he met with
Stephanie Szakal, assistant vice
chancellor for enterprise applica
tions, to discuss ways to improve
communication between the board
and officials behind the scenes.
“Communication lines weren’t
as strong as they should have been
between either party,” he said. “We
outlined what each needs to do and
SEE ELECTIONS, PAGE 5
9
Adam
Klein
Graduate,
City and
Regional
Planning
“I’m an out-of-state
resident and it helps
to participate in local
elections and to voice
opinions”
weather
a Mostly sunny
H 75, L 45
index
police log 2
calendar 2
crossword 7
sports 9
edit 10
    

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