North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 113, ISSUE 108
Legal questions dog Carrboro 4th seat
CANDIDATE PURSUES OFFICIAL
ANSWER TO PROCEDURE ISSUE
BY MEGHAN DAVIS
ASSISTANT CITY EDITOR
Former candidate Katrina Ryan is
asking for help from the state in resolv
ing confusion about how to fill the empty
Carrboro Board of Aldermen seat.
Mayor-elect Mark Chilton will
assume his new role Dec. 6, leaving a
seat available until his alderman term
A TIRELESS TRADITION
■BMP' -
DTH/WHITNEY SHEFTE
University ROTC color guard members leave a Veterans Day service held at Hill Hall on Friday. The commemoration featured speeches from veterans.
BY ROBBY MARSHALL staff writer
It was a day for servicemen and women past and pres
ent to unite.
Veterans, University ROTC members and the general
public filled more than half the seats of the grandiose Hill Hall
auditorium Friday for the ROTC Veterans Day ceremony.
The commemoration lasted little more than half an hour,
but the thick, silent energy inside the hall was representative
of thousands of lifetimes.
“This day is an opportunity to shake hands with ghosts of
the past,” said Derek Soloway, a retired Marine Corps staff
Drinking games cashed in
Distributors see profit in
harnessing gaming spirit
BY SAPNA MAHESHWARI
STAFF WRITER
Both teams have whittled their six-cup triangle
down to one cup each, and tensions are running
high.
The pingpong ball flies back and forth only to hit
rim or miss completely each time.
Finally, one team ends up sinking the ball into the
cup. Victory cheers erupt... and it’s time for the next
round.
It’s a situation many students have seen before.
Beer pong, also known as beirut, is a competition
between two-player teams that compete against each
other by trying to throw a pingpong ball into beer
filled cups. If the ball goes in, the other team drinks
from that cup. The goal is to eliminate all the cups
on the other side.
Beer pong is one of the most popular drinking
games around. Though the game itself is nothing
new, its recent introduction into retailers and bars
is.
SEE GAMES, PAGE 4
online | dailytarheel.com
IT'S WHAT'S FOR DINNER Shop
owner distributes free venison to locals
BLOGGIN' Beyond Blue Heavan blogs
about Molly Broad's last BOG meeting
MULTIMEDIA Check out Blue Fusion
for a slideshow of this weekend's sports
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
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ends in two years.
Ryan is seeking opinions from the
N. C. attorney general’s office and an
attorney for the N.C. General Assembly
on the provisions of the Town Code
that apply to the now-open fourth seat,
which she believes should be filled after
a special election.
“The whole legal question is get-
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DTH/LOGAN PRICE
Travis Kramer, 23, of California, plays in his first
ever round of beer pong at Lucy's bar last week
city |. page 2
HIGH QUALITY H2O
Aqua America Inc., the
nation's largest publicly
traded water utility company,
will provide services to the
Northwoods community.
| www.dailytarheel.com |
ting a bit more complex than anybody
anticipated,” Ryan said.
Ryan said the attorney general’s
office handed down an initial opinion
that Carrboro ought to have included a
fourth seat on November’s ballot, antici
pating that either Chilton or alderman
Alex Zaffron would vacate their seats.
Ryan said she will decide how to
proceed after hearing the results of
General Assembly attorney’s research,
which she expects before Tuesday.
Carrboro laws state that in a gen
eral municipal election, seats left open
sergeant.
Wade Phillips, a retired Navy lieu
tenant and guest of honor, was the
voice of the ceremony. Describing his
dual role as a student and a mem
ber of the military, he highlighted
his years spent in the University’s
ROTC.
Phillips, who served in World War
II and the Korean War, described
the hectic growth of the University
ROTC during World War 11, at which
time the draft was underway, “I’m a
Tar Heel born. I’m a Tar Heel bred.
The University’s wiliest population
Squirrels viewed
as part of campus
BY DESIREE SHOE
STAFF WRITER
They loom overhead in the
majestic trees of UNC’s campus,
a nearly constant presence. They
skitter across sidewalks and rail
ings, narrowly missing innocent
passers-by.
And they’re one of the first
things many new students notice,
simply due to their sheer number
and oddity.
It could be argued that UNC’s
squirrels are as much a part of
campus as the Bell Tower and the
Old Well.
Junior Briana Woods says she
once witnessed a strange squirrel
incident outside of Lenoir Dining
Hall.
“The squirrel was running into
people’s feet and it was mangy
clearly there was something wrong
with it. It fell into a trash can and
Hi *
by unexpired alderman terms are to
be filled by the person receiving the
fourth highest number of votes.
Ryan finished fourth Tuesday with
736 votes, about 12.6 percent of the
vote, according to unofficial results.
But Town Attorney Michael Brough,
in a memorandum to the aldermen,
wrote that the provision does not
apply to the situation at hand —a
vacancy arising after the election.
Brough also has stated that the
aldermen have no authority to hold a
special election.
“I’ll be a Tar Heel dead.”
The campus was on a hurry-up
schedule to get people in service
during World War 11, said Harry
Watson, a history professor.
But ROTC members still found
time to get involved in student life
beyond the military.
A former University band mem
ber, Phillips said his claim to fame
was that his standmate in the march
ing band was Andy Griffith, who
SEE VETERANS, PAGE 4
- WM IS j A MB
DTH/CRAIG CARTER
As winter approaches, these nut-hoarding tree dwellers will slowly
retreat toward their arbor abodes, of which there are plenty on campus.
everyone was laughing at it.”
“It was like it was drunk or
something,” she says.
When Woods passed by Lenoir
an hour later, the squirrel was
dead.
campus I page 4
CULTURE CELEBRATION
The Asian Students Association
holds its annual cultural
celebration show. The event
was held in Memorial Hall this
year to the delight of planners.
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2005
Zaffron said he stands behind
Brough’s interpretation. “It seems to
me the law is pretty clear,” he said.
“It’s going to be up to the newly con
stituted board to decide a procedure
and make an appointment,” he added.
The situation is not new, having
occurred when Mayor Mike Nelson
assumed his post in 1995, and the
aldermen appointed current Mayor
Pro Tern Diana McDuffee, the fourth
highest vote getter, to Nelson’s seat.
SEE 4TH SEAT, PAGE 4
As Broad
exits, BOG
business
as usual
Chancellor pay hikes OK’d
in president s last meeting
BY KAVITA PILLAI
STATE & NATIONAL EDITOR
It was business as usual Friday at the General
Administration building, except for one thing.
It was the last time system President Molly Broad,
who will retire Dec. 31 after an eight-year term marked
by rapid growth and change among the 16 universi
ties, would preside over the UNC-system’s Board of
Governors at an official meeting.
Amid emotional remarks from Broad, BOG
Chairman Brad Wilson and others, the board managed
to focus on the tasks at hand, passing a set of guidelines
for 2006-07 campus-based tuition hikes as well as sal
ary increases for most of the system’s chancellors.
The board approved pay hikes for 13 of the 16 chan
cellors, ranging from 8 percent to 16 percent. UNC
CH Chancellor James Moeser and N.C. State University
Chancellor Jim Oblinger each received raises of
$35,100, bringing their annual salaries to $309,897.
BOG member Charles Mercer, chairman of the
personnel and tenure committee, said the hikes are an
effort to put chancellor pay at North Carolina’s public
universities in line with the national market.
“Over the past five years or so, there has been a
concern that our... chancellors have been underpaid
compared with university leaders around the coun
try,” he said. “Getting our chancellor salaries up to the
market is in the best interest of the university and the
best interest of each of our campuses.”
Mercer said the raises aren’t about one-upping the
competition, but rather the board is trying to pay
chancellors what they are worth.
“We are just trying to ensure that our chancellors
are ... adequately compensated for the hard work
they do every day.”
SEE FINAL BUSINESS, PAGE 4
According to www.scarysquir
rel.org, a Web site devoted to
anti-squirrel propaganda, a “cam
pus alert” has been issued for the
SEE SQUIRRELS, PAGE 4
state I page 7
BALANCING ACT
N.C. School of the Arts interim
Chancellor Gretchen Bataille
finds herself busy as she
serves in both that post and in
her position with the system.
■
Katrina Ryan
is examining
the process
for filling the
vacant seat.
weather
• lb*. PM Showers
H 74, L 55
index
police log 2
calendar 2
crossword 6
edit 8
sports 12
    

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