North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 113, ISSUE 111
LONG AFTER THE
LEVEE BREAKS
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Gloria Hagans sits on the front porch of her apartment in Princeville on Tuesday. Hagans was one of thousands from the area who
was displaced by the flooding caused by Hurricane Floyd in 1999. Since the disaster hit, nearly the entire town has been rebuilt.
One town s recovery foreshadows path waiting Katrina-wrecked areas
BY ERIC JOHNSON
ASSISTANT STATE & NATIONAL EDITOR
PRINCEVILLE - Standing
atop the town’s rebuilt
levee, with the Tar River 36
feet below, it is difficult to
believe the water could ever
have risen so far.
But from the middle of
Princeville, where every
building has been rebuilt,
replaced or abandoned
since the flood of 1999, it becomes much easier to
imagine the town engulfed.
More than six years later, the impact of the water is
visible everywhere.
“Princeville is almost a completely brand new town,”
said Eric Evans, the community development adminis
trator for Edgecombe County.
“They built back better.”
In that way, the North Carolina community hit
hardest by the floods following Hurricane Floyd has
become a kind of benchmark —a best-case scenario
Science depts seek women
BY SHARI FELD
STAFF WRITER
When Etta Pisano enrolled at
the Duke University School of
Medicine in 1979, women com
posed about one-quarter ofher class
—a considerable increase from the
6 percent accepted to Duke’s first
class of medi
cal students in
1929.
Since her
medical school
days, Pisano, a
UNC professor
of radiology
and biomedi
cal engineer-
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ing, has become accustomed to the
male-dominated field. ,
She is one of three female fac
ulty members in the biomedical
engineering program at UNC.
Fifteen men hold faculty positions
in the department.
So it did not come as a surprise
to her when she was one of seven
online | dailytarhed.com
TURN UP THE HEAT Gov. Mike Easley
launches a way to help with heating bills
A LITTLE CONFUSING The newest
Medicare plan approved bewilders many
IS IT THE ANSWER? The high school
scheduling debate is back on the agenda
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
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Most of the damaged homes, such as this one on South Main
Street, were completely rebuilt using government funding.
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DTH/BRANDON MAYNARD
Etta Pisano, a professor of radiology and biomedical engineering at
UNC, is one of the minority of tenured female faculty in the sciences.
women among some 80 attend
ees at a meeting for the National
Institutes of Health in Washington,
D.C., in early October.
“That kind of made me pause, that
so few women had actually made it
| www.dailytarheel.com |
in September of 1999, all 2,153 residents were forced to
evacuate, and every structure in town was inundated.
Dramatic images of an entire community quickly
washed away made Princeville a focal point in the story
of North Carolina’s costliest natural disaster. Town
officials were flown to Washington, D.C., to meet with
President Clinton, and N.C. Gov. Jim Hunt pledged
that Princeville would be rebuilt.
Sam Knight was the town’s planning zoning officer
SEE REBUILDING, PAGE 9
to leadership positions in radiol
ogy,” said Pisano, UNC’s December
Commencement speaker.
A gender gap divides the science
SEE FACULTY GAP, PAGE 9
online
NOT A CHEAP DATE
UNC’s Habitat for Humanity
chapter holds a date auction to
help fund a trip to Honduras,
selling off Homecoming King
Matt Mullane, among others.
for hundreds of small Gulf
Coast towns coping with
the aftermath of hurricanes
Katrina and Rita.
It is also a reminder of
how much more daunting
the challenge might prove
for those communities.
Center of attention
When the Tar River over
flowed the Princeville levee
DEFINING JOHN BUNTING
BY BRIAN MACPHERSON
SENIOR WRITER
It’s not easy to choose a single
word to describe John Bunting.
“You’ve got to make up words
to describe Coach Bunting,” says
Tommy Richardson.
The fire in his eyes on the
practice field or the passion
in his voice in the locker room
might provide a glimpse of his
personality. The Super Bowl ring
on his finger, the ring he won as
the linebackers coach of the St.
Louis Rams in January of 2000,
might hint at his priorities.
And while a single word can
not describe any person, the
assortment offered by Bunting’s
players presents a picture of
the man who has instilled an
expectation of success in a North
Carolina football team once left
for dead in the new-look ACC.
“Determined,” says Steven Bell.
“Motivated,” says Cedrick Holt.
“Dedicated,” says Ronnie
McGill.
campus I page 2
THE UNC FAMILY
Jonathan Sauls, a UNC
graduate, returns to assume
the position in the Office of
Student Affairs responsible for
overseeing the Honor Court.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2005
Tuition talks
ready to hit
trustee table
TUITION ADVISORY GROUP
TO PRESENT IDEAS TODAY
BY BRIAN HUDSON
UNIVERSITY EDITOR
This year’s tuition hike discus
sion will kick into high gear today
as it goes before the University’s
Board of Trustees, although trust
ees will delay a final decision until
their January meeting.
During its five
meetings this semes
ter the campus’s
tuition advisory task
force did not come
to a consensus on
tuition, but mem
bers did settle on a
range of numbers.
The report pre
sented four options,
ranging from S2OO
to S3OO for under
graduate residents
and S6OO to S9OO
for undergraduate
nonresidents.
The task force also
supported raising
graduate students’
tuition between S3OO
and SSOO for resi
dents and between
SSOO and SBOO for
nonresidents.
As is the custom
with tuition hikes, 40
percent of revenue is
set to go to financial
aid, which raises stu
dent assistance in
line with the tuition
BOARD OF
TRUSTEES
MEETING
The Carolina Inn,
Chancellor Ballroom
East and West, 8 a.m.
TOPICS TO BE
DISCUSSED
Investment funds
Tuition hike proposals
Measures of excellence
Audit and Finance
Committee report
University Affairs
meeting report
ONLINE
Graduate students
mobilize to oppose
tuition hike proposals
increase. After that deduction each
of the four proposals would raise in
the neighborhood of $5 million in
net tuition revenue.
Though the group included the
proposals with its report, most of
the task force’s focus was on pri
oritizing the campus needs and
laying out where fimds should go.
Although the details of the tuition
proposal probably will change as it
goes before the trustees and later the
UNC-system Board of Governors,
however much money the campus
sees traditionally goes to the areas
targeted by the task force.
In addition to raising faculty
salaries and improving the faculty
student ratio, the task force over
whelmingly backed the idea of rais
ing the minimum teaching assistant
stipend to $7,000, which would cost
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Coach John Bunting is described with many words, but the one that is
most often used is "intense," as evidenced by his on-field demeanor.
“Enthusiastic,” says Mike
Mason.
“Fired-up,” says Andrew
Wasserman, stretching the rules
only slightly.
Two years ago it seemed more
likely that only the first half of
Wasserman’s assessment would
dive I page 5-8
YEP, THAT'S GOOD
Started as a label for indie,
more obscure rock, Yep Roc
Records has grown to include
bigger band labels and more
household notoriety.
the University roughly sl.l million.
Graduate students, many of
whom serve as research and teach
ing assistants, are an integral part
of fabric of the University, task
force members said.
“You get an incredible bang
for your buck when you invest in
graduate students,”
said Provost Robert
Shelton, co-chair
man of the task
force. “You get a
huge return on rela
tively small dollars.”
Members of the
task force said that
graduate students do
not look at the over
all price of education
when applying to
schools, but rather
they look at benefits
such as stipends.
“It’s like we’re hir
ing them,” said task
force member and
Faculty Chairwoman
Judith Wegner on
Wednesday during
the Board of Trustees’
meeting. “They’re
going to be looking
at how we are able to
compete.”
The focus on grad
uate and professional
students comes a year
after graduate student
leaders complained
they were left out of many campus
decisions, including tuition.
“We haven’t felt like we’ve been
a part of the discussion,” said Mike
Brady, president ofthe Graduate and
Professional Student Federation.
“It’s been more the social climate
than a particular issue.”
Board members as well as the
task force took steps this year to
ensure that graduate students are a
defined part of UNC-Chapel Hill’s
mission.
“I would suggest to you that we
very much agree that the graduate
issue, as someone said, is very much
off the radar,” said TVustee Rusty
Carter during the University affairs
committee meeting Wednesday.
“I can make the commitment to
SEE TUITION, PAGE 9
describe Bunting by now.
His Tar Heels had won five
games in two seasons, and a cul
ture of disaster seemed to perme
ate Kenan Stadium. Few analysts
gave the former All-ACC line-
SEE BUNTING, PAGE 9
weather
a Mostly Sunny
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