North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 113, ISSUE 114
CAMPUS BOWLED OVER
NEXT SYSTEM PRESIDENT BLOWS THROUGH UNC TO END TOUR
BY KAVITA PILLAI
STATE & NATIONAL EDITOR
Erskine Bowles made his
alma mater the last stop
on a whirlwind tour of
the 16 UNC-system campuses,
meeting Monday with University
faculty, administrators, trustees
and students.
After being named the succes
sor to retiring system President
Molly Broad, Bowles said he read
extensively about the university
and began meeting with campus
officials across the state.
The next step, he said, will
be sitting down with members
of General Administration and
legislators.
“Then I’m going to think,” he
said.
And he’ll have a lot to think
about. Bowles told members of
the UNC-CH Board of Trustees
that his vision for the University
involves many more specifics
than they currently have.
He asked that administrators
come up with more detailed
priorities so he and the UNC
system Board of Governors can
work collaboratively with the
campuses to implement them.
He lamented the fact that the
system’s long-range plan lacked
input from individual campuses,
and that the BOG itself had no
sense of ownership of its goals.
He said priorities should
include concrete timelines and
funding models.
“No wonder we had 16 cam
puses going off in 16 different
SEE BOWLES. PAGE 5
City schools tongue-tied
on best student services
BY LAURA OLENIACZ
STAFF WRITER
The tides of diversity converge
in Chapel Hill-Carrboro City
Schools as students whose
first language could be one of 60
spoken in the district demand
specialized programs to breach
cultural and language divides.
Of the 12 pre-kindergarten
children at McDougle Elementary
School, five leave their regu
lar classes to go to English as a
Second Language specialist Janet
Davis-Castro’s classroom.
“Show me the nose,” Davis-
Castro asked her small classroom
of squirming pupils Friday.
While she taught the parts of
the body, three of her students sat
in small chairs and pointed at a
large, colorful poster.
Seventy-five percent of pre-K
students in the city schools are
Latino, Davis-Castro said.
Steve Scroggs, assistant super
intendent for support services for
the district, said 9 percent of the
district’s student body is Latino,
forming the fastest growing
minority population in the area.
The district has struggled
to meet the needs of this grow
ing demographic as yearly test
scores continue to show a gap
online I dailytarheel.com
HOPE YET Study shows that job market
steadily improves in spite of recent layoffs
'SAF'E FOR EVERYONE? Students
propose ways to avoid biased decisions
MULTIMEDIA Check out Blue Fusion
for images from this weekend's games
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
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Erskine Bowles, who will take over as UNC-system president in January, talks with Student Body President Seth Dearmin at a luncheon in
Hyde Hall on Monday as part of his visit to Chapel Hill. Bowles met with students, faculty and members of the UNC-CH Board of Trustees.
A VISION OF SYSTEM UNITY
Task force, Bowles
discuss broader goals
BY LAUREN BERRY
STAFF WRITER
When Chancellor James Moeser formed
the task force on engagement with North
Carolina, he made it UNC-CH’s mission to
solidify its role in service to the state.
Efforts to reach his vision largely had
been limited to moves within the University
until Monday when a meeting that brought
UNC-system President-elect Erskine
Bowles to the table discussed greater col
laboration with the UNC system.
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DTH/CHRIS FIELDS
Janet Castro-Davis (left) reads "Miracle's Boys" by Jacqueline Woodson
to her fifth grade ESL class at McDougle Elementary School on Monday.
in achievement levels between
mainstream and minority perfor
mance —a gap that officials have
made a priority to close.
“It’s a gap that exists in all dis
tricts, but that’s not to justify it,”
said Stephanie Knott, assistant
superintendent for community
relations.
ESL programs, which are taught
by both bilingual and single-lan
guage faculty, provide varying lev
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During the task force’s second meeting,
campus leaders outlined the group’s focus.
Bowles addressed his desire to work in
partnership with the task force, which is
charged with exploring UNC-CH’s out
reach toward N.C. education, health and
the economy.
“I want to be an ally and a partner,” he
said. “And I want a group of people who
want to work with me in that way.”
Although no definite plans have been
set, the task force established during the
meeting the goal of a broader, systemwide
campaign of service.
Task force members discussed the need
to reconnect with other UNC-system uni
versities and smaller community colleges.
els of assistance in introductory- to
academic-level English.
Chapel Hill High School stu
dent Argenis Dominguez partici
pated in the district’s ESL pro
gram five years ago, praising it for
its influence on his education.
“If it wasn’t for that class I
would have struggled for several
years for how to manipulate the
SEE SPANISH, PAGE 5
campus I page 2
THE SOUND OF MUSIC
University group pairs up
student volunteers with
children who can't afford to
pay for music lessons at the
University Methodist Church,
Bowles also addressed this concern by
highlighting the need to re-engage all the
universities within the UNC-system.
“Right now we have 16 campuses going
off in 16 different directions,” he said.
Moeser said UNC-CH must use its posi
tion as the system’s flagship institution to
connect with other member universities.
“Asa leading university, we need to
lead within the state,” he said.
He stressed the need for other universi
ties to become involved in the UNC-CH’s
mission of public service in the state.
“Chapel Hill can provide leadership,
but Chapel Hill can not do it alone,”
SEE TASK FORCE, PAGE 5
‘The Hickory Hammer’
UNC wrestler rebounds from adversity to nail opponents
BY DANIEL MALLOY
SPORTS EDITOR
All of a sudden, Drew Forshey
is on his back.
It was too quick to even think
about.
It’s the third period, only down
a point, he can win this Bam!
There he is, on his back. The
referee slaps the Carmichael
Auditorium mat, and it’s over.
He’s raising the hand of this fresh
man from Virginia Tech named
Justin Staylor, and Forshey is
dumbstruck.
The only other time Forshey
was pinned in competition in his
life was four years ago, and that
didn’t even really count Just some
off-season tournament in Ohio.
This isn’t supposed to happen.
Not against a freshman, not in
the ACC. Not a pin.
Later that fateful Feb. 11,
Forshey is getting an earful on the
phone from North Carolina wres
tling coach C.D. Mock whose
Tar Heels, and Forshey, a junior
125-pounder, have their first home
meet of this season Saturday.
Mock tells Forshey he is going
to have to compete for his start
ing Spot again in a wrestle-off.
“This could be the reason why
you’ll never be good, or this can
be your finest hour,” Mock says.
“What are you going to do
about it?”
campus I page 4
IT'S OVER!
Families at Baity Hill rejoice
in newfound tranquility after
the final herd of displaced
undergraduates files out of
the new units Friday.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2005
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DTH FILE PHOTO
UNC wrestler Drew Forshey holds down Virginia Tech's Justin Staylor at
the ACC Championships in March. Forshey won the title with a 9-2 win.
'I got no excuses'
You can look at all the wins, but
it is almost too many to count.
The kid is a machine. Going
215-and-2 in high school? You
have got to be kidding.
Four state titles? Only three
other kids in the history of North
Carolina wrestling have done that.
Just watch him go. His team
mates call him “The Hickory
Hammer,” an homage to his home
town and his ability to nail foes to
the mat with brutal efficiency.
Mock compares his style to the
Tasmanian Devil. It’s just the way
City I page 8
OK, NOW WHAT?
After the failed referendum
regarding a county schools
special tax earlier this month,
school board members duke it
out about other options.
Hike
limits
frame
options
Officials consider
draft collaboration
BY BRIAN HUDSON
UNIVERSITY EDITOR
In response to a limit on campus
based tuition and fee increases that
has left campus leaders considering
which hike to reduce, administra
tors are calling for more collabora
tion during the process of drafting
proposed tuition and fee increases.
During its
final meeting in
October, UNC-
Chapel Hill’s
tuition advisory
task force settled
on three propos
als that would
raise tuition
between $250
and S3OO for
undergraduate
residents and
S6OO to S9OO for
undergraduate
nonresidents.
H
Trustee Karol
Mason's plan
would give
UNC room to
consider hikes.
The chancellor’s committee on stu
dent fees recommended to the Board
of Thistees a $170.05 hike in under
graduate fees.
But the UNC-system Board of
Governors is imposing a $451 cap on
in-state undergraduate tuition and
fees hikes meaning administrators
must choose between scrapping the
S3OO tuition hike or reducing the fee
increase for undergraduate students.
But before the University’s
Board of Trustees considered
the task force’s report Thursday,
Trustee Karol Mason, a member of
the tuition task force, submitted a
tuition proposal that would raise
resident and nonresident under-
SEE TUITION & FEES, PAGE 5
he whips around the mat with
reckless abandon almost car
toon-like.
“He just has a very, very aggres
sive, physical style of wrestling,”
Mock says. “It’s very attractive to
fans. He’s fun to watch. There’s
very little unexciting about a
Forshey match.”
But Mock didn’t care so much
about the 215 wins. That’s too
many overmatched kids. Physically,
Forshey had them all.
Nope, Mock had to look at the
two. That seemingly insignificant
SEE FORSHEY, PAGE 5
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