North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 115, ISSUE 130
New campus pushes talks
Town, UNC discuss Carolina North
BY SARA GREGORY
CITY EDITOR
Town and University officials
charged with plotting the course
of the school's growth chatted
Sunday about where a major
expansion is headed.
Discussion about the
University’s
proposed sat
ellite research
campus,
Carolina North,
proceeded cau
tiously after
some members
INSIDE
Town Council
members plan
for 2008 at
annual retreat.
PAGE 5
of the Chapel Hill Town Council
expressed reservations at their
annual retreat Saturday.
Mayor Kevin Foy emphasized
that he did not want informal
discussion to be interpreted as
id 81 -
DTH/ALEXANDRA PORTER
Students wait in Phillips Hall to meet with academic advisers on
Wednesday. Students now must check their academic status in person.
Graduation tips
are now offline
Student Central
system removed
BY KELLEN MOORE
STAFF WRITER
As students and advisers pair
up to conquer academic problems
this semester, most seniors and
juniors have one fewer weapon in
their academic arsenal.
The automated degree audit,
an online system that allowed
students to see which <*irriculum
requirements they had fulfilled
and which remained, is not avail
able this semester.
The Graduation Requirements
Advising System on Student
Central took the audit system's
place, but this system doesn’t work
for students under the pre-2006
curriculum and might be adding
to the line at academic advising
this week.
“We were in a situation where
we had half of the students in one
system and half in another, and we
were having a very hard time man
aging both of them," University
Registrar Alice Poehls said.
The number of students meet
ing with advisers is on par with
past years, but some of those stu
dents only want to know if they
are on track with their gradua
tion requirements, said Carolyn
Cannon, associate dean of aca
demic advising.
“Perhaps if the degree audit was
there, they would have depended
on that," Cannon said.
As of Thursday afternoon,
the advisers had seen about 425
seniors, Cannon said. The office
didn’t have a known number of
juniors, sophomores and fresh
men who visited.
Although the academic advis
announcement
WORK FOR LA COUNA
The Daily Tar Heel's monthly Spanish
language section is hiring reporters,
translators and copy editors. Applications
are due Wednesday in Union 2409. Contact
lacolinadesk@gmail.com with questions. *
(The Satlu ®ar Hrrl
decisions on the part of the coun
cil. which indicated it would seek
public input first.
This is supposed to be a con
versation," Foy said. “We are not
making decisions."
Carolina North, to be located on
the University's Horace Williams
property, is planned as a research
and innovation campus. Faculty,
employee and graduate student
housing also is planned, in addi
tion to retail space.
The meeting among the
council, UNC Chancellor James
Moeser, Carolina North Executive
Director Jack Evans and trustees
Roger Perry and Bob Winston
comes just more than a week
before the council sees the concept
plan Jan. 23 for the Innovation
Center, a business incubator and
ing office has a full lineup of 20
full-time advisers, five administra
tors and 12 support staff members,
the first several weeks of school
are keeping advisers busy and
students waiting.
“When you walk out the door
and see that line ... you feel like
you need to keep things going as
quickly as you can," Cannon said.
“You will shorten everything you’re
doing that day to keep these lines
moving."
The old system was taken
offline for several reasons but
namely because it required advis
ers to manually update students'
course information, so it was not
always up to date and accurate.
Senior Layne Powers said she
took a class that fulfilled two
requirements, but the automated
degree audit listed it as fulfill
ing only one. A visit to academic
advising solved the problem.
Despite the old system’s flaws,
some juniors and seniors said they
are disappointed that the audit
system is gone.
“1 miss it," senior Erin Turner
said. ‘1 needed to use it at the
beginning of the semester and
couldn’t’
In addition to managing the
two existing systems, the staff
of the Office of the University
Registrar simultaneously began
creating a third degree audit sys
tem to replace the Student Central
system.
The new system will take effect
in fall 2010 as part of Enterprise
Resource Planning, a long-term
project that will integrate all cam
pus computing systems beginning
in February.
Contact the University Editor
at udesk@unc.edu.
city j paj*v 4 •
MORATORIUM EXPIRING
The Chapel Hill Town Council
will hear a recommendation
tonight that the moratorium on
development of the Northern
Area not be renewed.
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
www.dailytarheel.com
the first building slated for con
struction.
Sunday's conversation sought to
identify the process for moving the
plans forward.
“We really are driving toward
the creation of a process," Moeser
said. “The key issue is how we get
to that process."
At immediate conflict is the
special-use permit the University
requested to allow construc
tion to begin on the Innovation
Center before the master plan is
approved.
Several council members said
Saturday they did not want the
University to make a habit of
requesting special-use permits for
each building of the campus.
“That’s not what we want
either," Moeser told the council.
“If the town will work with us in
good faith to bring this, then we
won’t bring any more."
Parents consider switch to public school
BY ELISABETH ARRIERO
ASSISTANT CITY EDITOR
Private school students got a
glimpse of public school life on
Friday at an informational session
at East Chapel Hill High School.
More than 50 eighth-grade stu
dents and their parents attended
the annual session, which informed
attendees about everything from
high school course requirements
to extracurricular opportunities.
Carol Scheible, a mother of
three, said that she wanted her
kids to start their education at a
school with a religious atmosphere
Perry, who is chairman of the
Board of Trustees, said that the
University has a “unique oppor
tunity’ with the Innovation
Center but that its success
depends on timeliness of receiv
ing approval.
“We re asking for special con
sideration, and we know it’s not
the right thing to do ordinarily,"
Perry said.
The master plan calls for
construction in stages. The
University plans to develop on
about 250-acres of the nearly
1,000-acre plot throughout the
next 50 years.
A 15-year scenario of possible
growth shows a portion of that
construction complete and cen
tered near Martin Luther King Jr.
Boulevard.
“We don't know exactly in what
SEE CAMPUS, PAGE 11
S.C. NOTEBOOK
‘Road Trip’ for Ron Paul
55SS"‘" CHAWXSroKSC :
assistant state 4 national editors National Convention, throug
The narrow street winds past aban- g percent showings in lowa and
doned warehouses and empty parking Hamps hire, respectively.
lots before bending at a nameless auto According t 0 polling published in a Jan. 10
mechanic’s shop adorned with three Rep ort, Paul won 5 percent support
“Ron Paul for President” campaign signs- , n latest South Carolina tdqjhooe
Home to Ron FanV* Charierfon campav&a Micfcael-Shettey and Yus fellow Tar HeeUto
headquarters, the shop features gnm steel walls christened their adventures . to*
covered in a collage of Ron Paul posters and übe rty.” gome even gave up then UNC
libertarian paraphernalia. vs. N.C. State basketball tickets to camp gn
l On Saturday the shop also played host to man they said has a genuine shot at winning
Paiee Michael-Shetley and about a dozen other presidency . .
UNC students who drove five hours to South not just blowing hot air, sat
Carolina to spend their second consecutive H&rris &mQ freshman.
strict constitutionalism and SEE RON PAUL. PAGE 11
mm
, n„ n messaoe of personal freedom
but that the reputation of Chapel
Hill-Carrboro City Schools pulled
her private school family into the
public realm.
"I don’t see any reason to pay
money when this is so good," said
Scheible, whose youngest daugh
ter, now in eighth grade, might
make the transition soon.
East offers 19 Advanced
Placement courses high school
classes for which students can earn
college credit —and boasts an aver
age SAT score nearly 300 points
above the statewide average.
Despite the strong academics,
dai Ktarhivl.com
TRACK AND FIELD
The men's and women's teams
host the the Joe Hilton Tar Heel
Invitational on Saturday to begin
their seasons. The women take
six victories and the men four.
JUMPIN’AROUND
Jh ’ JljPpßyV % ’ ’ jim • i gfa T I
DTH/ALLIE MULLIN
unior Danny Green dances to “Jump Around” at the
start of Saturdays basketball game against N.C. State.
For full coverage of the Tar Heels' 93-62 win. flip over to
SportsMondav on page 12. Visit dailytarheel.com for a photo
slideshow and a video of the game.
“East has challenged me in many ways
... Ifeel very well preparedfor college”
TIM BAYUS, EAST CHAPEL HIU HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR
Scheible said, she still had concerns
about switching to public schools.
"It was the bigness of the school
that concerned me," Scheible said.
"I was worried that she would get
lost and shuffled."
Many parents at the session
Friday expressed similar concerns
regarding school size.
"It is a big transition to go from
this day in history
JAN. 14, 1960 ...
Senior Eddie Maynard is fined $lO
for wearing a mask at an
attempted "panty raid" on
women's dorms. The raid attempt
lasted for more than two hours.
MONDAY, JANUARY 14, 2008
a small private school to a big pub
lic school," Keith Simmons, anoth
er parent, said.
Simmon’s daughter attends
Duke School in Durham, where
the teacher-student ratio in its
middle school is 1 to 12.
At East most classes have 25 to
SEE SCHOOLS, PAGE 11
weather
V Partly *
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index" 50127
police log 2
calendar 2
opinion g
games n
sports 12
    

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