North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 115, ISSUE 131
Ticket
scare
stresses
seniors
Some need letter
for Duke lottery
BY COLIN CAMPBELL
STAff WRITER
Seniors in the School
of Journalism and Mass
Communication are facing addi
tional hassles in their efforts to get
their hands on Duke basketball
tickets because of an online error
with their graduation status.
About 400 journalism students
got an e-mail Friday from the tick
et office informing them that “the
latest information... indicates you
ARE NOT graduating this year."
The students now must take
steps to prove their graduation
status before Friday s deadline for
ticket distribution registration.
Senior Nicole Murphy was
among the students who waited up
to an hour Monday in the journal
ism school records office for a letter
proving her graduation status.
“1 w as surprised." Murphy said.
“I feel like the UNC system isn't
as structured as it should be."
SEE DUKE TICKETS, PAGE 6
How to declare
graduation status
for Duke tickets
► Visit the Office of the
University Registrar in the
Student and Academic Services
Buildings or the records office
in the School of Journalism and
Mass Communication in Carroll
158 to get a letter proving your
graduation status.
► Bring the letter to the Smith
Center ticket office by Friday.
► Make sure you're registered
online for the ticket lottery at
tarheelblue.com.
States debate effects of early primaries
Upcoming primaries
The following states have a
presidential primary coming up.
■ Before Feb. 5
■ On Feb. 5
/ SOURCE: POLITICS
T*"N* NYTIMES.COM
\ DTH/CHRISTINE HE LUNGER
Grammy winners deliver intimate performance
Country act sells out Memorial Hall
BY KEVIN TURNER
STAFF WRITER
Fifteen Grammies, internation
al tours and millions of records
sold weren't enough to make the
“Three Gifts and their Buddy" tour
feel like a ritzy showcase Monday.
Instead, Carolina Performing Arts'
presentation of four country-folk
stars felt more like a group of
friends playing music in a comfort
able living room.
Three music powerhouses
announcement
WORK FOR THE DTH
Come and team more about working for
the DTH at an interest meeting 5 p.m.
Wednesday in the Union's Frank Graham
Lounge. Staff applications are due by 5 pm.
Jan. 23 and are available in Union 2409.
Senring the students and the University community since 1893
dhr Daily dar Heel
UNC settles harassment suit
BY ANDREW DUNN
SENIOR WRITER
Highly successful women’s soccer coach Anson
Dorrance and the University have ended a nine
year sexual harassment lawsuit brought against
them by a former player.
Dorrance avoided trial but was forced to apol
ogize for inappropriate discussions about sex
among his teams in a settlement announced last
week to the UNC Board of Governors.
Melissa Jennings, plaintiff in the sexual harass
ment and invasion of privacy lawsuit, which was
filed in 1998, will receive $385,000 in the deal.
She claimed Dorrance had intimidated players
Women's soccer
coach Anson
Dorrance
battled claims
for nine years.
CAMPUS ELECTIONS STARTING
The road to student elections: 2008
• M- H ,
Mandatory Candidates Meeting: TODAY Private Campaigning and Signatures: WEDNESDAY
8 p.m . Pleasants family Room, Wilson Library [7 p.m. to 9 p.m. only, excludes weekends and ends Jan 21
All hopefuls must attend to declare their intent Private campaigning is one-on-one discussion about platforms
jto run in wnting with the Board of Elections \ jand candidate Web sites without the use of campaign materials.
Those who do not attend may run as write-ins ~ m
* DORMSTORMING
Petitions Due. JAN. 22 -/////
- * ” ? , ; Those who gather enough signatures > 111 i
(" —S'j will officially be considered candidates /' ' /
j Public Campaigning: JAN. 22 J j Those who do not have 24 hours to ~■ H '
| Begins after petitions are turned in. pj obtain the necessary cjgn
opportunity for hopefuls to publicize their I |
media Student body president: 800
s' 10 • T I • Residence Hall Association
V Ma,erial ***** 1 a m - JAN 29 mt m class^officers: 350
With just two weeks until the election, candidates will kick their {■ M . Giaduate and Profess , onai Sludent j
’UK/ campaigns into high gear, placing signs around campus to reach ■ federation president 100
as man T POible Each office has a spending limit | . R esldenCP area governors 50
E Congress representatives
IKpENDINgI
t LIMITS J 'BTFORME
■r pTpTpii a
I L • SBP/CAA S4OO violation of B Election Day FEB. 12
B • RHA/GPSF 5250 election laws ■ Results announced in f '' H -
B •Senior class: SI 50 CarrollHaMoom 111 >
■ • Congress: S2O .
I
SOURCE: STUDENT COOL, TTTLE V) | OTH/REBECCA ROlfE
BY ELIZABETH DEORNELLAS
STATE a NATIONAL EDITOR
Michigan will hold its presi
dential primaries today in defi
ance of national sanctions that
have denied delegates from both
parties seats at the nominating
conventions this summer.
Although national commit
tees stripped Michigan of half its
Republican representation and
all its Democratic delegates, the
state’s parties have expressed con
fidence that the eventual nominees
will allow all delegates to vote.
North Carolina denied to take
such a risk, rejecting a bill to mow
its primary from May to February.
Sen. Andrew Brock, R-Davie,
Emmylou Harris, Shawn Colvin
and Patty Griffin packed a
punch as they performed together
to a sold-out audience on the third
day of their national tour Monday.
Joining the songstresses was their
“buddy" Nashville-based guitar
ist Buddy Miller.
“For me these shows are the
most incredible thing," Miller said,
"my favorite people and the most
incredible voices."
And there was a lot of music to
university | page r
FOR THE MEN
UNC's housing department will
introduce anew learning
community in the fall for men
that will seek to address issues
men face in society.
www.dailytarheel.com
sponsor of the failed bill, said mov
ing the primary to an earlier date
would have increased N.C. voter
participation.
“We can either have national
prominence right now ... or be a
part of just a procedure later on,"
Brock said, adding that conven
tion delegates merely confirm the
party's nominee.
Neither the N.C. GOP nor the
N.C. Democratic Party took an offi
cial stance on Brock’s bill, which
died in committee last February.
One objection legislators raised
was the increased cost of holding
an early primary, estimated at sev
eral million dollars.
Kerra Bolton, communications
go around onstage.
The four performers took turns
leading songs, singing original
pieces and playing covers of their
favorite country and folk music.
“We’re making this our living
room for the night, if that’s OK,"
Harris said before she began her
first song.
The four played a nearly two
hour-long set while sitting on
four chairs lined up amid nearly a
dozen guitars. The concert, which
was peppered with witty banter,
featured music ranging from gos
pel, bluegrass and blues to cov
into sharing details of their personal lives.
UNC also will have to review and revise its sexu
al harassment policies as part of the settlement.
Nancy Hogshead-Makar, a law professor at
Florida Coastal School of Law who describes her
self as a “high-profile advocate for gender-equity
in athletics," will be in charge of the review.
Both sides declared the settlement a victory.
“We wanted it to be clear that there have been no
laws broken," Athletic Director Dick Baddour said.
“We've had interest for some time in trying to settle
the case.... We're comfortable with where wv are."
SEE SETTLEMENT, PAGE 6
director for the N.C. Democratic
Party, stated via e-mail that an
early primary wouldn't have made
North Carolina a large-impact state
because there are already 20 prima
ries scheduled on Feb. 5, the earliest
date that could have been chosen.
Bill Nowling, spokesman for
the Michigan GOP, said the elec
tion could be decided after those
20 primaries.
He said the benefit of having
presidential candidates in the state
firing up base voters early has
far outweighed the negative of los
ing delegates.
“It’s paid off over the last six
SEE MICHIGAN, PAGE 6
ers of Joni Mitchell and Porter
Wagoner originals.
“There’s only one hard thing
about this tour," Colvin said. “And
that’s having to follow Patty, Buddy
or Emmylou.’
Based on the repeated roars of
applause from the crowd, it might
be difficult to imagine that the
commanding performance by four
of country music’s biggest names
was not the first choice of Carolina
Performing Arts.
Grammy award-winning coun-
SEE CONCERT, PAGE 6
pulse | page 7
ALCOHOL AND UNC LIFE
A monthly culture feature
explores consequences for
underage drinkers, health
effects of blacking out and
home beer brewing as a hobby.
The story so far
Aug. 1998: Soccer team
mates Melissa Jennings and
Debbie Keller file lawsuits
against Coach Anson Dorrance,
alleging sexual harassment
between 19% and 1998
March 2004: The University
settles with Keller for $70,000
Oct. 2004: U.S. District Court
throws out Jennings' lawsuit
Meeting kicks off campaigns
BY MATTHEW PRICE
STAFF WRITER
The monthlong road to
Election Day officially begins
today although serious
contenders for office prob
ably have been spinning their
wheels for months.
After candidates attend
tonight’s mandatory interest
meeting, they will be allowed
to petition students to put
their names on the Feb. 12
general election ballot.
“I think there’s a lot of
excitement surrounding this
election, with a lot of poten
tial candidates." said Mitchell
Capriglione. chairman of the
Board of Elections.
“We had our best turnout
for the optional candidates
meeting," he said, referring
to the Dec. 4 informational
session.
And even though candi
dates can't begin talking to
groups about tbeir platforms
until next week, this year's
leaders say their would-be
replacements have plenty to
do already.
“Last year in December and
January, I was putting togeth
er my campaign team," said
Colby Almond, president of the
Carolina Athletic Association.
“A good team is important.
There's no way that anyone
VOUCHING FOR TEACHERS
■g, JW If
■ ■
DTH/KRISTIN WILSON
First grade teacher Rhonda Coleman shops for school
supplies at the East Chapel Hill Rotary- Club sup
ply store Monday. The recently opened store gave
teachers SIOO vouchers to shop there. “I’m impressed. It’s
really nice of them to do this for us,” Coleman said.
this day in history
JAN. 15.2000...
UNC women's soccer coach Anson
Dorrance is named coach of the
year by Soccer Times Web site.
Six members of the team also are
named to the All-America team.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 15, 2008
April 2007: The U.S. Court of
Appeals rules that the lower
court should hear the case
Oct. 2007: The U.S.
Supreme Court denies the
M.C. Attorney General's Office
petition to bring the case to
Washington.
Jan. 2008: UNC settles with
Jennings for $385,000.
can do the massive amount of
work by themselves.”
Student Body President
Eve Carson said meeting with
campus officials and students
was also an important and sat
isfying preparation.
“1 remember during peti
tion week, one of my favorite
nights of the campaign, we
just got on the P2P and rode
around getting signatures’
Carson said. “It was a really
social atmosphere."
The most personal part of
the campaign. Capriglione
said, is the first two weeks,
when candidates are
dormstorming and begin
ning to share their platforms
in public forums.
“The system forces candi
dates to talk to the student
body, instead of slapping up a
flier," he said.
“Petitions let students
meet candidates one-on-one,
which Mi important on a Large
campus."
As the race progresses, can
didates will need to consider
election rules just as much as
their publicity .
Those campaigns that get
ahead in the process could
face fines or other consequenc
es that the elections board
SEE ELECTIONS, PAGE 6
weather
O Sunny
H 45, L 24
index
police log 2
calendar 2
games 9
sports 9
opinion 10
    

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