North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 116, ISSUE 24
A DREAM MATCHUP
UNC-KANSAS SHOWDOWN A
TREAT FOR HOOPS PURISTS
BV GREGG FOUND
SENIOR WRITER
Roy Williams, when asked
Tuesday to describe what he sees
in Kansas's team, named three of
its biggest strengths.
“Their fourth strength,"
Williams said, “is they have no
weaknesses.”
Williams faces the daunting
task this week of preparing North
Carolina to play against one of the
most domi
nant, most
versatile and
most balanced
teams in the
country.
But Kansas
coach Bill Self
faces the exact
same task.
“I guess we
could be the
underdogs
because we're
the fourth No.
INSIDE
Check out the
DTH's prediction
for Saturday's
game.
PAGE 4
1 seed," Self said in Monday's news
conference. “But 1 really think in
this situation, there's not much dif
ference between any of the teams
from a performance standpoint."
Such is the clash of the titans
Saturday, a battle of two unstop
pable forces where pinpointing an
advantage here or a disadvantage
there is tough to do.
And it's a matchup that bas
ketball historians salivate about
North Carolina is the second
winningest program in the his
tory of college basketball (behind
Kentucky). Kansas is third.
But the showdown would be
scintillating even without the
history, just because of the way
both teams have steamrolled so
many opponents this season.
Kansas is beating its foes by
19.4 points, on average, good
Friends cheer Heels in homemade ‘Alamo’
-% , ' jg||v HI L
DTH/JUUFT SPERLING
McKenzie Sumner, Josh Navey and John Linkous sit in the Alamo,
a fort that they built out of sheets and duct tape for the Final Four.
Floyd not interested in UNC’s top job
Despite ties, WSU head staying put
BY WHITNEY KISLING
UNIVERSITY EDITOR
Elson Floyd, president of
Washington State University, has
declined an offer to be a candidate
for UNC’s next chancellor.
“It was sort of tough. It was a
unique opportunity to go back to
UNC,” he told The Seattle Times.
“But I'm fulfilling my commitment
here —and doing so gleefully."
Although the search has been
kept extremely secret, several mem
bers of the UNC community outside
of the search committee have men
tioned Floyd’s name as one of the
top candidates for the position.
“I would have been surprised if he
online | dailvtarhwl.uom
CITY Glen Lennox residents meet with
developers to discuss neighborhood plans.
ARTS ESTEEM plans an open mic night
for 7 p.m. today at Campus Y.
SPORTS The No. 15 women's tennis
team beat rival N.C. State Thursday.
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
01fp Daily ®ar Jtwl
GAME TIME: About 8:47 p.m.
BROADCAST: CBS
RADIO: WCHL
WATCH THE GAME AT
THE SMITH CENTER:
Viewing party schedule of
events Saturday
► 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.: Basketball
museum open
► 5 p.m.: Entrance A opens for UNC
students, faculty and staff (with
valid One Card)
► 5:30 p.m.: Entrance A opens for
general public
► Concessions and Final Four mer
chandise will be on sale
for first in the country. North
Carolina? It’s winning by 16.9
points, for third place.
“They can play slow; they can
play fast," Williams said of the
Jayhawks. “They can defend.
They can shoot it inside; they
can shoot it outside. I'm just
really, really impressed by 'em."
If anything, the Jayhawks'
balance makes them tough to
stop. Seven different players
have led the team in scoring
and seven different players have
led the team in rebounding.
In fact, none of the Jayhawks
landed on the AP All-Big 12
first-team mostly because they
siphoned votes from each other.
Three of them Darrell Arthur.
Mario Chalmers and Brandon
Rush were named to the sec
ond team.
“They have a lot of great play
ers, good inside and outside pres
ence," TYler Hansbmugh said.
While some teams, when
game planning for UNC, start
SEE UNC-KANSAS. PAGE 4
wasn’t a candidate," said Bill Friday,
former UNC-system president who
worked with Floyd, also a UNC
alumnus, when he was an adminis
trator within the system.
“This day in age, when there's
such a shortage of really experienced
people, it's not unusual for candi
dates to withdraw their names."
Connie Niva, chairwoman of
the Washington State University
Board of Regents, said Floyd told
the board in confidence that he had
been approached by UNC and had
declined the offer.
“Dr. Floyd is very committed to
WSU, and we were not concerned
that he was going to leave because
sports section
FINAL FOUR IN-DEPTH
For more information and
analysis of this year's historic
Final Four, pick up a special edi
tion of Sport Saturday this week- j
end before the tournament.
www.dailytarheei.com
WE r 1 -j* -*• -
m : I
DTH FILE/DAVID ENARSON
The Tar Heels are returning to the Final Four after failing to reach the past two. Waiting for the Tar Heels
in San Antonio will be the Kansas Jayhawks. KU advanced to the final Four after defeating Davidson.
BY SARAH FRIER
SENIOR WRITER
A patchwork tent of seven
Carolina-themed bedsheets
hangs from the ceiling fan in the
living room.
Light blue pillow- cases,
secured with duct tape, fill the
holes.
It’s four mattresses long and
one couch thick.
They call it "The Alamo."
“Since we can’t go there, we
brought the game here," said
senior Matt Ellis, one of the six
students who has been sleeping
in the fort since UNC's men's bas
ketball team beat the University
of Louisville on Saturday.
“We re trying to keep it up till
Elson Floyd
was mentioned
as a potential
candidate
because of past
work within the
UNC system.
he has committed to us and he’s
happy at WSU," she said.
There has been no specific reason
cited for Floyd's rejection, which he
told the board about in late March,
though one of the biggest challenges
in finding UNC's next chancellor is
creating a competitive salary .
Chancellor James Moeser, now
in his eighth year at UNC, makes
about $390,000 plus benefits
and perks, such as a house. The
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DTH FILE/DAVID ENARSON
Monday," senior Josh Navey said.
“It’s a good luck charm."
The Alamo fort inspired by the
Alamodome in San Antonio where
the final basketball games will be
played this year, was crafted in
spontaneous celebration after the
team’s Elite Eight victory.
“Everybody brought their
individual childhood expertise,"
senior John Linkous said.
The roommates originally laid
out mattresses for extra seating
while w-atching games.
And then the Alamo was built,
using sheets, “those clips that go
on chip bags, duct tape and will
power" junior McKenzie Sumner
said.
On Wednesday night, to cel
80th percentile salary of UNC’s
peer institutions' presidents is
5455.000. But Floyd, who has
been at Washington State since
2006, makes about $650,000.
Floyd, now in his early 50s, also
was considered during the 2000
chancellor search, which ultimately
led to Moeser’s hiring.
Although Floyd was not selected,
Jim Peacock, a member of the 2000
search committee, said he was well
qualified for the position.
“The sense was that he would
potentially be an excellent can
didate but that this was an early
point in his life and his career for
this job," he said.
In 2005 Floyd w-as also noted as
SEE FLOYD, PAGE 4
sports | page 7
SPRING FOOTBALL
Fans can get their first look at
the Tar Heels at 1 p.m. Saturday
at Kenan Stadium when the
team plays it Spring Showcase.
There is no charge for admission.
DTH FIIE/AlllE MUUIN
ebrate the halfway point between
the Louisville game and the Final
Four Kansas matchup, the group
had an Alamo party in the fort.
“We’re really just trying to
raise awareness," Sumner joked.
“Because there are all these peo
ple on campus who don’t know
we re in the Final Four."
UNC guard J.B. Tanner even
visited the fort before departing
for Texas.
The roommates plan to watch
the game on a TV set that one of
them won shooting free throws at
Late Night With Roy last year.
Until then they’re preparing.
Every night after ESPN’s
SEE ALAMO, PAGE 4
Raynor prioritizes
tuition discussions
BY BRIAN AUSTIN
STAFF WRITER
J.J. Raynor will be the student
responsible for dealing with what
is perhaps the most contentious
issue on campus tuition.
The newly
elected student
body president
has made it
a goal to per
suade the Board
of Trustees to
Analyzing
i • IJ. Raynor's
platform;
\ one /think
nt a time
see her perspective on tuition
talks. Her substantive plan has
yet to emerge, but she outlined her
approach during her campaign.
Past student body presidents have
this dav in history
APRIL 4,1944...
Nanane Porcher, the first woman to
become stage manager at
Play Makers and first undergraduate
to receive a fellowship, plays the
roleofakitten in a play.
FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 2008
Town
readies
for big
game
Police plan for
at least 10,000
BY JESSICA STRINGER
STAFF WRITER
When UNC won the NCAA
Tournament in 2005, revelers
at Bub O'Malley's on Rosemary
Street tried to steal the bathroom
doors, owner James Rippe said.
Several people were burned
by celebratory bonfires on
Franklin Street, Chapel Hill
police Lt. Kevin Gunter said.
This year business owners
and police are busy gearing up
for large crowds on Franklin
Street in anticipation of a
Saturday night Final Four win.
Gunter said he expects 10,000
to 12,000 people on Franklin
Street on Saturday and. should
the Heels advance, 50,000 on
Monday night.
On a celebration night 380
officers from other counties
and tow-ns will join forces with
SEE CELEBRATION. PAGE 4
Here's what to
expect if crowds
rush Franklin Street:
Street Closings
No vehicular traffic will be allowed
in the closed area. There will also
be limited access to the residential
areas immediately around the
central business district:
► Franklin Street from Raleigh
Street to Mallette Street
► Columbia Street from Cameron
Avenue to Rosemary Street
Parking
► Parking meters on the 100
block of East Franklin Street, all
of Henderson Street and North
Columbia Street will be bagged for
no parking starting at 3:30 p.m.
► Vehicles parked on the 100 block
of East Franklin Street Henderson
Street and North Columbia Street
will be towed starting at 7 p.m.
► When the streets close, vehicles
parked in these North and South
alleys will not have access to the
street to leave.
Alcohol
► No alcoholic beverages will be
allowed in the closed area.
► Bars and restaurants that sell
alcohol have been asked to restrict
all servings to paper or plastic cups
to keep glass out of the area. All
bulk sales should be in cans.
focused almost solely on balancing
in-state and out-of-state increases
or on tuition predictability. Usually
they make their cases to die Board
ofTrustees with personal or student
speeches at the voting meeting.
Raynor says she wants to bring
the trustees quantitative analysis
of the burden of tuition as it falls
on the middle class, a plank that is
summed up in one question:
‘To what extent are we forcing
middle-income students out of
Carolina?"
For the 2008-09 year, in-state
tuition will not increase while out-
SEE TUITION, PAGE 4
weather
T-Storms
H 77,164
index
police log 2
calendar 2
sports 7
games 11
opinion 12
    

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