North Carolina Newspapers

    elir Daily Sor Hrrl
Michelle Obama makes campaign stop
Cites husband’s
strengths in talk
BY JAKE RATLIFF
STAFF WRITER
RALEIGH Michelle Obama
took the stage Tuesday night at
N.C. State University’s Reynolds
Coliseum as the crowd chanted,
"Yes, we can!”
“An- we fired up and ready to go?”
she asked the crowd, which answered
with a resounding cheer.
“I don’t know if you’ve heard,"
she said, "But my husband. Barack
Obama, is running for president.”
Michelle Obama began her
speech by outlining the ways her
husband has ran a successful cam
paign. defying pundits who said he
didn't have a chance.
She cited his success in grassroots
organizing and his ability to raise
funds from "regular folks" as ways he
has been able to compete politically.
"Twenty-three dollars means as
much as $2,300,” she said.
The potential first lady then
commented on the level of politi
cal involvement she has witnessed
this election season.
“Look at all of you here, not for
a candidate but for the spouse of a
candidate," she said, and the crowd
applauded for so long that she had
to pause her speech to take it all
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“Michelle is an
extension of Barack.
Its just the same as
if Barack were here
himself'
EZELL BROWN, raieigh resident
in.
“People are talking about super
delegates and delegates nobody
had any idea what those were
before," she said.
“Barack Obama wins in big
states, little states, red states and
blue states.”
The crowd numbered about
5.500 students and volunteers, as
well as supporters from around the
Triangle area.
Dan Leistikow, a spokesman
for the Obama campaign, said the
event attracted 3,000 more people
than Michelle Obama had ever
before brought in when speaking
by herself.
“Michelle brings a different facet
of Barack Obama to our living
rooms," said N.C. Rep. TV Harrell,
D-VVakc. “She brings the message
of change when he can’t.”
Audience members echoed the
sentiment that Michelle Obama is
a valuable part of the campaign.
“Michelle is an extension of
... .
DTH/KATE NAPIER
Michelle Obama speaks to a crowd of about 5,500 people at N.C. State
University on Tuesday. Visit dailytarheel.com for a photo slideshow.
Barack," said Ezell Brown, a
Raleigh resident.
“It’s just the same as if Barack
were here himself."
Before the speech a volunteer
for the campaign urged audience
members to help register voters.
“If everyone in this room got one
person registered to vote, we’d be
doing alright," he said.
Voter registration has been a
central component of the Obama
campaign, as volunteers are can
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vassing neighborhoods, shopping
centers and college campuses to
register as many voters as they can
before the April 11 deadline.
“It includes a major push on
campus," Leistikow said.
“If you’re from somewhere else
but you’re living here for college,
you still can make a difference hen
in North Carolina."
Contact the State E£? Xational
Editor at stntdexkfa unc.edu.
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9. ‘2OOB
Board issues third plan
for elementary school
BY SARAH FRIER
ASSISTANT CITY EDITOR
After a year of heated debate about
how to balance economic diversity
in Orange County Schools. Board of
Eduction members decided Monday
that all students who currently
attend Hillsborough Elementary
School will be allowed to return.
But a student districted for
Efland-Cheeks or Central elemen
tary schools who wants to enter
Hillsborough Elementary’s kinder
garten class must either have a low
socioeconomic status or a sibling
already at the school.
This is the third plan the board
has approved for this issue in the
past nine months.
“The debates are over," board
member Al Hartkopf said.
“Hallelujah."
Previous plans have merged and
split schools or put limits on which
students could attend Hillsborough
Elementary.
“I’m happy with the fact that
Hillsborough Elementary students
can stay," school board candidate Jell
Michalski said. “But HES is a school
ofchoice, and any student who wants
to should be able to go there."
Members found it difficult to reach
a majority vote Monday night.
The board decided to take action
because the number of students in
the free and reduced lunch program
at Central Elementary School is al
almost 70 percent, compared ti
about 14 percent at Hillsborough
Hartkopf said.
By barring students from attend
ing Hillsborough Elementary, boari
members hoped to even number
out
“Rather than helping Centra
and Efland kids do better, the;
were proposing raising the achieu
ment of those schools by bringin>
smarter kids in." Michalski said.
Studies show that this works t
a certain extent, said Lori Rogers.;
PTA member and former Cameroi
Park Elementary teacher.
The new plan will encourag
low-income student enrollment a
I lillsborough Elementary by provkl
ing free day care during breaks am
increasing bus routes, board Vic<
Chairwoman Debbie Piscitelli said.
But because Hillsborougi
Elementary is a year-round school
no student can be forced to attend
The new hoard will take seat
July 7. and changes w ill go inti
effect at Hillsborough Elemental-;
when school starts July 14.
Contact the City Edito
at citudeskh unc.cdu
5
    

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