North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 116, ISSUE 35
LANDFILL PUSHES LIMIT
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DTH/ADAM GRAETZ
Municipal solid waste is moved and buried at the Orange County Landfill. The landfill is set to reach capacity by 2010, and county officials are
looking for a location to build a waste transfer site. Transferring trash outside of the county is less expensive than burying it at the landfill.-
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DTH/ADAM GRAET7
Compressed cubes of steel recyclable cans await transfer at the Orange
County Landfill. The county recycles almost 50 percent of its trash.
Whose trash fills the county's landfill?
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Town of The rest of UNC campus Town of Town of
Chape! Hill Orange County and hospitals Carrboro Hillsborough
SOURCE: WWW.COORANGE.NC US/RECYCLINGSTATS.ASP DTWCHRtSTINE HE LUNGER
Dance company advances ‘non-narrative art’
Show incorporates atypical elements
BY PHILLIP CROOK
STAFf WRITER
The work of the Merce
Cunningham Dance Company is
of the sort that often challenges
audiences' intuitions about what
is and what isn’t ‘art.’'
For many in attendance at
Carolina Performing Arts’ pre
sentation of the company Friday,
the convergence of jarring music,
graphic sets and atypical move
ment defied expectation and
resulted in utter confusion.
Others came to Memorial
Hall to indulge in the non-nar
rative choreography of Merce
Cunningham considered the
world's greatest living choreogra
pher —and left satisfied with the
simple appreciation for bodies in
city I page 5
50 YEARS OF PUBLIC BOOKS
Five Chapel Hill residents with
close ties to the public library tell
how it has evolved during the
past 50 years at an anniversary
panel discussion Sunday.
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
altr latlu @ar Mrrl
motion.
The inevitable clash between
innovation in artistic expression
and people's desire for familiar
perceptions was expressed at first
through laughter and applause
when five audience members were
selected to roll a die to determine
the sequence of elements in the
first dance, “Split Sides." But what
started as amusement concluded
in an erratic murmur after the
performance as the hall buzzed
with people's reactions, tastes and
questions.
“I didn’t find myself look
ing for meaning in w’hat I saw,’
said Michal Osterweil, a UNC
graduate student in attendance.
"Maybe that’s the point. Maybe
we’re not supposed to know the
State i page 9
THIRD-PARTY ACCESS
Michael Munger, a Libertarian
running for N.C. governor, will speak
today at UNC about third-party
ballot access. Third-party candidates
often face an uphill battle.
>\ www.dailytarheel.com |
COUNTY'S TRASH IN QUESTION
WITH LANDFILL SET TO CLOSE
BY CATARINA SARAIVA
SENIOR WRITER
For years, controversy sur
rounding the Orange County
landfills closing has riddled both
county leaders and residents.
The landfill, which is expected
to reach capacity around June
2010, will be
sealed, and all
trash will start
being shipped
out of the coun
ty, said Gayle
Wilson, solid
waste manage
ment director.
Rogers-
Eubanks com
munity mem
bers, who have
been neighbors
to the landfill
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OTH ONLINE
Video
stories
from neighbors
of the landfill.
since it opened, have complained
about its impact, but leaders say
the transfer station’s effects will
be minimal.
After touring a similar site in
Greensboro last year. Commissioner
Mike Nelson said the closed-in
facility would hold trash for no
more than a few hours.
“The impact will be a lot less
than a landfill,' Nelson said in
March 2007.
DTH/SARAH RIAZATI
Dancers from the Merce Cunningham Dance Company performed two
pieces, ’Split Sides* and ’eyeSpace,” Friday night in Memorial Hall.
point.’
Emil Kang, UNC’s executive
director for the arts, said that no
matter what audience members
thought leaving the evening's per
formance, the purpose of bringing
such a progressive dance company
Lack of space for another land
fill in Orange County led com
missioners to decide on a waste
transfer station, a closed facility
that will receive waste and ship it
back out on trucks.
“Probably once we decide where
our transfer station is going to be-,
we wi11... solicit proposals from var
ious landfills that are interested in
receiving our waste," Wilson said.
He said landfills will quote pric
es they will charge Orange County
for its waste and the commission
ers will pick the most viable option,
based on the landfill s location and
other elements such as whether it’s
in a minority neighborhood.
The price will likely be in the
$22- to S2B-per-ton range, Wilson
said. In 2005 the landfill took about
85,650 tons of waste. At that rate, it
would cost $1.9 million to $2.4 mil
lion annually.
The county's 2007 commission
er-approved budget appropriated
just more than $4 million to total
landfill operations. But new state
legislation likely will cause transfer
prices to increase, Wilson said.
Once a landfill is closed, it must
also be properly maintained for
at least .30 years to ensure harm-
SEE TRASH, PAGE 6
to Chapel Hill was to create con
versation about challenging artis
tic material.
“The question of how audi
ences experience non-narrative
SEE SHOW, PAGE 6
city | page* 4
ON THE FARM
Thirty-five local farms were
featured during the 13th annual
Piedmont Farm Tour. Places visited
included Eco Farms of Carrboro,
which raises hogs and turkeys.
Ice cream race
churns moolah
Replaces annual
poker tournament
BY ZACK TYMAN
STAFF WRITER
Ice cream and running prob
ably aren't the best mix. but they
did raise money to help fight
world hunger.
On Sunday, Nourish
International hosted the Maple
View Challenge to raise money
for the group.
More than 250 participants came
out for the race, which was set up
in place of the group's annual Hold
'Em For Hunger
Tournament.
That event was
canceled in
March because
it violated a
state law against
gambling.
INSIDE
A student paper
on the Hold 'Em
tourney wins an
award.
PAGE 9
“It was very frustrating for
us," said Amy Zipursky. co-chair
woman of Nourish International.
"We had to cancel it only six weeks
before the event, and we had
already committed to people."
The group's goal was to raise
at least $25,000 during the year,
which would fund sustainable
development projects in Mexico.
Honduras and Peru this summer.
Last year about 500 people
participated in the poker tour
nament, and that number was
expected to double this year.
The Maple View Challenge
brought in about $3,800 for
Nourish International, said senior
David Campbell, the race orga
nizer. Each runner paid a sls
entrance fee, and Maple View Ice
Cream in Carrboro provided the
ice cream for a reduced price.
Zipursky said Nourish met its
goat for the year,
lenge and other fundraisers.
1 i Jf
COURTESY OF MEGAN LEE
Emergency Medical Technician volunteer Megan Lee (left) waits at a
fire scene with personnel getting equipment ready to help with rehab
Student EMTs get
real-life experience
BY ERIN WILTGEN
STAFF WRITER
It’s his first cardiac arrest.
Junior Paul Trottman crouch
es in the back as the ambulance
careens through Raleigh's neigh
borhood streets, its sirens a high
pitched fanfare for the arrival.
As it jerks to a stop, TYottman
jogs behind the rest of the
Emergency Medical Technician
squad —a paramedic and another
EMT volunteer into the house.
The victim of the arrest is dead.
But the team still begins a resusci
tation procedure with Trottman in
charge of the endotracheal tube,
which helps people breathe if they
can’t do it themselves.
*lf this woman dfd live, it
would've been in a large part
because of me," TYottman said. "I
don’t think I’d ever seen anyone
dead before. But there wasn't anv-
this day in history
APRIL 21,1999 ...
The University announces that N.C.
Senate President Pro Tern Marc
Basnight and presidential candidate
Bill Bradley will receive honorary
degrees at Commencement.
MONDAY, APRIL 21. 2008
T'
H-
DTH/EMMA PATTI
Nourish International hosted
the Maple View Challenge on
Sunday in place of the Hold’em
For Hunger Tournament.
Campbell, who is not involved
with the gniup, approached it with
the idea of the race.
“We came to them and proposed
this idea, and they w ere elated," he
said. “It was a harebrain idea that
we put together in four weeks."
The runners began at Morehead
Planetarium and Science Center
and ran about a mile to the inter
section of Roberson and Weaver
streets in Carrboro. Upon their
arrival, the runners had to eat a pint
of ice cream and then make the long
journey back.
Some participants came dressed
in costumes.
“It was very, very hot but it was
very exciting," said senior Nick
Hutchins, who came dressed as
a gorilla and won best costume,
along with his friend Matt Hamrick.
“There were lots of people cheering
SEE NOURISH. PAGE 6
thing we could do."
Trottman, a religious stud
ies major on the pre-med track,
became an EMT volunteer with
Six Forks Emergency Medical
Services in February 2007.
Six Forks, an oflshoot of the Wake
County EMS system with service in
Raleigh, has 24 active volunteers.
Trottman. who averages about
two 12-hour shifts a month, has
worked with Six Forks for a little
more than a year. He started the
semester-long class in August
2006 and passed the certification
exam the next December.
‘One day 1 just all of a sudden
thought. ’Maybe I want to be a.
doctor.'" Trottman said. “I thought
that it would be a good indicator
of whether I like medicine."
At Six Forks, each ambulance
SEE EMT. PAGE 6
weather
T-storms
H 68, L 54
index
police log 2
calendar 2
opinion 8
games 11
sports 12
    

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