North Carolina Newspapers

    2
THURSDAY. JUNE 19, 2008
dhr Oaily Har Hrrl
www.dailytarheel.com
Established 1893
115 years of
editorialfreedom
RACHEL CUNT
ULLRICH JOHNSON
SUMMER EDITOR OPINION EDITOR
9624214 962-0372
RULLRIC HOE MAIL ONLINEOUNC EDU
UNC.EDU
IAMIF WILL
imiiiVauc HARRISON
niLLiHina copy editor
MANAGING EDITOR 962 4103
962 0750 WILLHSIOEMAIL
iamesweoemail unc eou
UNC.EDU
BRIAN AUSTIN DniWMAWW
UNIVERSITY EDITOR
TfDz-uj/A 962-07S0
UDESKOUNC EDU RACHEIROEMAIL
UNC.EDU
ABBEY
CALDWELL RACHEL WILL
CITY EDITOR ONLINE EDITOR
962-4209 962-0750
CITYOESKOUNC EDU ONLINEOUNC.EDU
DEVIN A bby JEFFERS
ROONEY DESIGN EDITOR
STATE & NATIONAL (919) 962 0750
EDITOR 962-4103 ABBYIEFFOEMAII
STNTDESKOUNC EDU UNC EDU
POWELL BUSS PIERCE
LATIMER graphics editor
SPORTS EDITOR
962 4710
SPORTSOUNC EDU OMAiL.COM
► The Daily Tar Heel
reports any inaccurate infor
mation published as soon as
the error is discovered.
► Corrections for front
page errors will he printed
on the front page. Any other
incorrect information will In
corrected on page 3. Errors
committed on the Opinion
Page have corrections print
ed on that page. Corrections
also are noted in the online
versions of our stories.
► Please contact Managing
Editor Jamie Williams at
jameswe(a email.unc.edu
with issues about this policy.
P.O Bo* 3257, Chapei Hill. NC 27515
Rachel UHnch. Sumrw Editor, 962-0750
Advertising & Business 962 1163
News. Features Sports 962-0245
One copy per person, additional copies may be
purchased at The Daily Tar Heel for S.2S each
O 2008 DTH Publishing Corp
All rights reserved
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Wikipedia: where anyone can break news
FROM STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS
It is well known around Carroll Hall that the journalism industry is rapidly
changing. Add the fact that Wikipedia broke the news of “Meet the Press"
host Tim Russert’s death before anyone else to the list of events that prove the
concept of professional journalism is getting increasingly murky.
According to Business Week, the news was posted on Russert’s Wikipedia page
at 2 p.m., a full hour before the New York Times posted an item and an hour and
a half before Russert’s own NBC sent the legendary Tom Brokaw out to inform the
nation of the news.
There is no indication of exactly who posted the update, but the IP address goes
back to an IT firm that works on the Web site of —surprise!— NBC News.
NOTED. It was just a normal afternoon for
Indiana 12-year-old Dominique Morefield, who
was operating a lemonade stand with her friends,
but that all changed when a man approached
and demanded their profits. All sl7-50 of them.
Morefield then took action, chasing the
man into a nearby house and calling police.
The man was eventually arrested on felony
charges of robbery.
THURSDAY
Art exhibition Carrboro artist
Maggi Ann Grace is presenting
an exhibition titled "How High
the Moon." which features India
inspired paintings. The exhibit
opened June 1 and will continue
through September 1 at Tonali
Restaurant in Durham. Call 489-
8000 for more information or visit
Grace’s Web site at http://www.
maggigrace.com/pamtings.html.
Time: Various times
Location: Tonali Restaurant, 3642
Shannon Road in Durham
Dinner series: The Carolina
Crossroads restaurant inside The
Carolina Inn is kicking off its
"Diamonds Are a Diner's Best
Friend" dinner series with the help
of chef Jimmy Reale and other
local chefs from AAA Four Diamond
award-winning restaurants. The
cost is 595 per person plus tax and
gratuity.
Time: 6:30 p.m.
Location Carolina Inn, 211 Pittsboro
St
FRIDAY
Science activity The Morehead
QUOTED. "We don't feel that someone in the
parade who is topless or nearly naked is appro
priate for a family audience."
Ashland, Ore., July 4 parade chairman
James Kidd, in response to Ashland resident
Jen Moss, who said she planned to ride in the
parade wearing only a hemp G-string.
Moss is known as the "naked lady" around
town for frequently biking topless.
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
• Planetarium and Science Center
| will host 'DESTINY Days," a series
: that offers visitors an insight into
• its science education initiative, the
: DESTINY traveling science learn
• ing program. The 40-foot mobile
: laboratory will be open to the public
• for hands-on scientific exploration.
1 Admission is free with a planetarium
; ticket or S3 otherwise. For more infor
j mation, call 962-1236.
: Time 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
• Location: Morehead Planetarium
: and Science Center, 250 E. Franklin
: st.
• Hog day: The 26th Annual
• Hillsborough Hog Day will feature a
: barbecue cook-off, live entertainment,
• arts and crafts, children's activities,
| antique car show, vendors and much
• more. There will be a concert Friday
| by The Deal and the Flabbergasters
• Admission is S5, children under 12 are
• admitted free. Call 732-8156 for more
: information.
• Time: Friday 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.,
: Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
• Location: Downtown Hillsborough
j and Cameron Park
SATURDAY
• Sidewalk sale: The Shops at
News
Eastgate will be having a sidewalk
sale. There will be great savings and
specials. Visit http://www.shoppin
geastgate.com for details.
Time all day
Location The Shops at Eastgate,
1800 E. Franklin St.
Summer solstice celebration The
UNC Forest Theater will host a family
summer solstice celebration. It will
feature songs and stories from around
the world with storyteller Faye Stanley
Families and their children are invited
to dress in costumers that honof-tbe—
moon.
Time: 7 p.m.
Location UNC Forest Theater on
Country Club Road
To make a calendar submission,
visit www.dailytarheel.com/calendar,
or e-mail Managing Editor Andrew Liu
at ajliuOemail.unc.edu with 'calendar'
in the subject line. Events will be pub
fished in the newspaper on the day and
the day before they take place, and will
be posted online when received.
Submissions must be sent in by
noon the preceding publication date
Easley pushing for
drought legislation
BY JESSICA SPRINGER
SPECIAL TO THE OTH
What seemed to be one of the
worst droughts North Carolina
had ever seen, starting with water
shortages last summer, turned out
to be just the start of an unfortu
nate environmental trend that the
governor's office says might be- alle
viated. in part, with legislation.
Gov. Mike Easley sent one of
his chief spokesmen. Deputy Press
Secretary Seth Effron, to ITNC on
Tuesday to explain the proposed
bill and press the N.C. General
Assembly to take action.
Effron discussed the bill's key
provisions. which include the reg
istration of large industrial water
withdrawals and transfers.
The bill also would prohibit
communities from charging less for
increased water usage and require
them to develop water shortage
plans involving water audits.
Incentives are part of the |iackage
for those who follow the guidelines.
“If communities met certain
restrictions, they would receive a
better opportunity to receive safe
water loans from the state and
tax breaks for big businesses that
traditionally use a lot of water but
choose to cut down," Effron said.
Effron was on campus to
address the N.C. Scholastic Media
Association's Summer Institute
and also talked about his transition
from journalism to politics.
But it was the drought that was
on his mind Tuesday, from lesser
shortages to the heaviest droughts
in western North Carolina.
"I like to think of it as just
-tlmii/hl, Uillv.uJA.viHLii>jH’ sjiiivvfd
off the drought meter -a map null-*
eating by color code which parts of
the state an* in which level of water
distress. “If you're in one of the col
ors, you're in bad shape.'
As of June 10. the state had seen
2.5 inches less than the previous
year’s rainfall total, which starts
the state in a water deficit just as
the dry season liegins.
Effron called the current envi
ronmental state “news that oozes"
an issue that's hard to see until
it's at the (leak of its destruction.
In March. Easley publicly rec
ognized the drought and called for
the General Assembly to pass his
legislative plan to modernize water
svstems, mandate conservation and
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DTH/JESSICA SPRINGER
Seth Effron, deputy press secretary
for Gov. Mike Easley, holds up a
drought meter to explain the levels
of drought throughout the state.
upgrade emergency response.
Now. with summer here and the
drought spreading again across the
state, Easley is pushing for urgent
action, even though there have
been drier times.
Ryan Boyles, director of the state
climate office, said that despite the
current shortage, N.C. droughts are
nothing new.
“From looking at tree rings we can
see that there have been worse peri
ods of drought in the past,” he said.
Easley has persisted in his cam
paign to deal with the water issue.
“The legislature has been in
town five weeks and still has not
taken up our request on authori
zation to deal with this drought,’
Easley admonished legislators in a
Tiress release June 12. "We have a
drought this year, and the legisla
ture needs to act this year."
Effron said the bill is complex and
will require significant input from
legislative committees and staffs now
focused on passing a state budget
Some lobbyists and legisla
tors have questioned whether the
governor has the pow*er to enact
his water conservation plan and
whether legislation is needed.
N.C. law states that the governor
can declare the drought an emer
gency only if there is a threat to
health and safety.
Contact the State £? National
Editor at stntdeskfa unc.edu.
    

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