North Carolina Newspapers

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Scholarships
see private
competition
Programs still
remain popular
IY MARY KATHERINE AYERS
STAFF WRITER
While merit scholarships at UNC
still retain strong offer acceptance
rates, they face increasing competi
tion from private universities.
Charles Lovelace, the executive
director of the Morehead-Cain
Scholars Program, said the scholar
ship had a 73 percent yield for this
falls incoming freshman class, with
85 offers and 62 acceptances.
The average draw over the last
10 years is around 80 percent.
Lovelace said the foundation
hoped for 65 acceptances, and wants
to up that number to 75 per class.
Lovelace said UNC fared better
than most other programs around
the country in terms of yield.
"It was a competitive year for
everybody," he said. “Schools are
becoming more aggressive in their
financial aid policies."
Marjorie Strickland, the assis
tant director for external rela
tions for the Robertson Scholars
Program, said the program has had
one of its strongest yields ever
70 percent for the incoming class,
with 27 offers and 19 acceptances.
The yield for last year's incoming
class was 48 percent.
Tony Brown, the president of
the Robertson program, said the
increase was due to Strickland’s
recruiting efforts. Over the past
year, the program sent Robertson
graduates to high schools around
the country to garner interest.
"It was very effective," Brown
said. “This is the first time we have
ever done that."
Lovelace said there is little
real competition between the tw o
scholarships, since a student can
not apply to both.
“I feel they’re complimentary
in many ways, they help us recruit
here," he said. “It’s attractive to
prospective students to see other
opportunities here."
Of those students w ho did turn
down the Morehead-Cain scholar
ship, Lovelace said three-fourths
went to Harvard, Princeton, Yale
or Stanford.
Because those schools generally
have lower admission rates than
UNC, they could be seen as more
prestigious, increasing the likeli
hood that a student accepted to
one of those select schools would
choose it over others.
Adding to this competition is
newly-increased financial aid for
these students, making the offer
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“School* are becom
ing more aggressive
in their financial
aid policies
CHARLES LOVELACE, MORE HEAD
CAIN SCHOLARS PROGRAM EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
from expensive private schools com
parable with the price of UNC.
Bill Fitzsimmons, dean of admis
sions and financial aid to students
at Harvard University, said the col
lege wanted to be more affordable
in order to be more accessible to
students everyw here.
“We’re after the best people in
the world, and we’re certainly after
the best people in North Carolina,"
Fitzsimmons said.
He said that many people don’t
even think of applying to private
schools such as Harvard because
they have more affordable public
universities in their own state.
With Harvard’s new financial
aid program. Fitzsimmons said
over 90 percent of the U.S. popu
lation could go to Harvard for the
same or less than it would cost to
go to a flagship state university.
Despite the struggle with
other schools, Lovelace said the
Morehead-Cain scholarship is
becoming more internally com
petitive as the program expands to
consider more students.
In February 2007, the Gordon
and Mary Cain Foundation
announced that it would give
SIOO million to the John Motley
Morehead Foundation, making it
the Morehead-Cain Foundation.
The Cain grant allowed the
Morehead Foundation to re-estab
lish the percentage of Morehead-
Cain Scholars in the freshman class
to its previous levels, Lovelace said.
He added that as UNC's freshman
classes had grown, the foundation
had not kept its ratio consistent.
Lovelace said that although the
number of Morehead scholars is
increasing, the program is continu
ing to place a heavy emphasis on
keeping the education the same.
While Strickland said the
Robertson program hopes that
strong yields will continue. Brown
said the program isn’t for every
body.
"1 don’t worry too much about
yield," he said. “I want people to
come into this program and have
it be instrumental to their educa
tional development in college."
Contact the University Editor
at udesk(aunc.edu.
Durham to host dance festival
Will highlight
modern style
BY BENNETT CAMPBELL
SENIOR WRITER
Durham often is referred to as
the “City of Medicine."
But each June and July; the city
right down Tobacco Road might as
well be called the “City of Dance."
That’s because every summer,
Duke University’s Page Auditorium
and Reynolds Industries Theater
play host to the American Dance
Festival.
Now celebrating its 75th year,
and in its third week of sum
mer, ADF is set to feature world
renowned modern dance theater
Pilobolus this weekend.
The group will present a world
premiere performance as well as
a dance choreographed by former
member Martha Clarke.
But the festival doesn’t stop
there. It continues until July
19, featuring works from world
famous dance groups such
as Compagnie Maguy Marin.
Martha Graham Dance Company;
Battleworks and Doug Varone and
Dancers, which was just in Chapel
Hill recently for the Long Leaf
Opera Festival.
Here's a more in-depth look at
what ADF is bringing to North
Carolina during the rest of the
summer:
June 19-21
World Premiere & Other WorAr.s
Pilobolus
Pilobolus. a Connecticut-based
modem dance troupe, wowed audi
ences at ADF last summer. The
group is set to return this weekend
with two brand new works, titled
“Razor: Mirror" and “Lanterna
Magica," along with special help
from Basil Twist, a New York pup
peteer.
June 24-25
“Umweir
Compagnie Maguy Marin
This French group made its
debut at ADF 25 years ago and
is returning to perform this
unique show, a presentation of
every day movements stylistically
performed in front of an arrange
ment of mirrors.
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News
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CONTRIBUTION FROM THE AMERICAN DANCE COMPANY / JOHN DEANE
Fang-Yi Sheu performs in "Spectre-1914,"a work choreographed by the Martha Graham Dance Company.
The group will return to the American Dance Festival from June 26-28 at Duke University's Page Auditorium.
June 26-28
Concerto Sir Twenty-Two ”
Lar Lubovitch Dance Company
New York City-based cho
reographer Lar Lubovitch has
composed works for ballet and
Broadway;
“Concerto Six Twenty-Two,"
though, stands as one of his most
famous. The piece, composed more
than 20 years ago, is arranged to
Mozart's “Concerto for Clarinet
and Orchestra."
THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008
June 30-July 2
"Ella. Promenade ir Reel Time'
Battleworks
Robert Battle and his nine
person dance troupe will pres
ent another ADF-commissioned
world premiere. The company
also will present “Ella," a one-per
son tribute to famous singer Ella
Fitzgerald.
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CHAPEL HILL
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Recycle these items at the Curb
and Apartment Complexes: I
Plastic Bottles. Metal Cans, Glass Bottles*
Mixed Paper (junk mail, cereal boxes, milk cartons),
Magazines. Newspapers & Phonebooks
NO plastic bags, please!
Recycle
Corrugated Cardboard at 24-hour Drop-off Sites
and Solid Waste Convenience Centers
Recycle
Batteries, Motor Oil, Oil Filters and Antifreeze
at Solid Waste Convenience Centers.
Bring Paint, Pesticides and other Chemicals to the
Household Hazardous Waste Collection
KMon-Fri 10am-6pm
Saturdays 7:30-12 noon
Orange County Landfill
Eubanks Rd. Chapel Hill.
Recycle
Computers, Televisions and other Electronic
Equipment at Solid Waste Convenience Centers
H Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri, 7am-7pm
Saturday 7am-5 Sundays 1-5
For more information and center locations
visit www.co.orange.nc.us/recycling/
Orange County Solid Waste Management
968-2788
■%(F recyding@co.orange.nc.us vr
Later this summer
Shows continue until July 19.
Visit americandancefestival.
org for a calendar of showtimes
and locations for this weekend’s
and other performances, as well
as more upcoming events this
summer.
Contact the City Editor
at citydesk(a une.edu.
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