North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 116, ISSUE 56
* SportS | page 6
PRACTICE HOW YOU PLAY
The Tar Heels plan to use a
"mock game" at Saturday's
practice to prepare for a real
game environment, including
having coaches in the press box.
university | page 4
KNOW WHERE FEES GO
The student fee audit
committee plans to examine
the finances of campus groups
that receive student fees. The
committee met Thursday.
photo | page 2
PHOTOS OF THE WEEK
View a selection of the week's
best photos every Friday
starting today.
features | page 3
MILLIONS OF MEALS
* Thousands of N.C. college
students will pack up meals this
weekend to be sent to school
lunch programs in impoverished
areas oversees. Stop Hunger
Now sponsors the program.
online | daifytarheel.com
GOP BARBEQUE
Young Republicans mingle
with older GOP members.
ARTS
Musical acts jam into the
night on Weaver Street.
this day in history
AUG. 22.1985
The Interfratemity Council plans
making the final week of its
three-and-a-half week Rush
process alcohol-free to phase
out drinking during recruitment.
Today’s weather
! : /\ Mostly sunny
H 86, L 65
Saturday weather
, :v Mostly sunny
H 86, L 65
index
police log ;..2
calendar 2
sports 6
crossword 9
edit...... ....:.. ...10
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
Elie laxly (Far Mrri
Junior scholarship to launch
Merit-based award in Carson’s name
BY MARYANN BARONE
STAFF WRITER
This spring, one University
junior will be the inaugural
recipient of the Eve Marie Carson
Scholarship, created in honor of the
former student body president.
The scholarship will be award
ed to a junior based on merit.
“I think it’s a wonderful way to
honor Eve and her leadership, at
Carolina,” said Vice Chancellor
for Student Affairs Margaret
GOP MEMBERS
TAILGATE
p '' 4 JjETjfißfg
DTH/LISA PEPIN
N.C. House of Representatives District 33 candidate Paul Terrell 111 loads a plate full of barbecue
Thursday night at the "Low Country Boii" fundraising event sponsored by the Young Republicans.
Events aim to capture
interest of youth vote
BY DEVIN ROONEY
ASSISTANT STATE & NATIONAL EDITOR
RALEIGH Leaders of the Wake County
Young Republicans say that most people under
estimate youth support for the GOP.
They’re trying to energize their peers in an
election year where the spotlight on the youth
vote has been focused on Democrats and the
sweeping mobilization of young liberals.
Part of that is showing youth the party’s diver
sity, said Jonathan Bandy, executive director of
the Wake County Young Republicans.
“We’re not the party that everyone thinks we
are,” he said, adding that many youth members are
more progressive Qian old guard Republicans.
In one effort to reach out, long-standing and
emerging leaders are turning to the Internet and a
new brand of campaign event to bring out a group
Historian search under way
BY MEGHAN PRICHARD
STAFF WRITER
One important aspect of
the Histories and Mysteries
of Carolina tour was missing
Tuesday.
Paul Kapp, who contributed a
wealth of knowledge to the tour
as the University’s first campus
historic preservation manager,
left UNC this
summer.
Kapp took
a position at
the School of
Architecture
at the
University
of Illinois
at Urbana-
Champaign
as an associ
ate professor
of historic
preserva
tion.
i
Paul Kapp
retired as UNC’s
historian this
summer and is
now at Illinois.
He said that while his job
at UNC was extremely gratify
ing, he also knew it was time to
move on. In Illinois he will be
able to move into more of an
educator role.
“I set goals for myself and I
succeeded beyond my wildest
dreams," Kapp said. “Then I
asked myself, “What would I like
to do now?’”
www.dailytarheel.com
Jablonski.
The scholarship committee
does not yet know how large the
award will be or for how many
years it will be awarded.
A meeting was held Thursday
for those interested in helping
promote, run or raise funds for
the scholarship. Another meeting
will be held Wednesday.
The idea of a junior-year schol
arship was part of Carson’s plat
form as student body president.
DTH ONLINE
Video l oo
of the CU”
GOP
gathering on
Thursday.
of Wake County Young Republicans.
Thursday, Republicans young and old gathered
around barbecue, wine and a keg to promote GOP
candidates at the Wake group’s annual fundraiser.
N.C. Young Republicans is aiming to inspire
political activism with its third annual tailgating
contest. The contest entails hosting Republican
themed tailgates throughout the football season,
with a prize for the best showing.
People are more comfortable discussing politics
in an open, honest way at casual gatherings like
football games and concerts, where tailgates are
typically held, said Dave Reynolds, former Wake
SEE GOP, PAGE 5
Smsm ' //// / / / / / 71
DTH/SARAH BOWMAN
Professor of African Studies Tim McMillan informs a group of students
about the segregation of plots at the cemetery located on campus.
Anna Wu, University architect
and director of facilities planning
at UNC said Kapp has skills in both
architecture and preservation.
“He has a great eye, and I think
he helped us both with o'ur old
resources as well as our new ones.
He was able to look at the big pic
ture as well as the fine details.”
Kapp planned this year’s renova
tion of Old East and Old West, as
well as past renovations of the Paxil
Green Theatre, the Campus Y and
Starting a
scholarship for
juniors was a
priority for
former Student
Body President
Eve Carson.
Her original plan was to name
the scholarship in honor of former
Chancellor James Moeser for his
service to the University.
The scholarship will now be
given in remembrance of Carson,
who was killed in March.
thit has not typically been a
high-profile base for the party.
They are drawing on
the popularity of MySpace,
Facebook and You Tube
among youth to capture their
interest and recruit them, said
Brannon Lambert, chairman
Gerrard Hall.
“He had the ability to relate
positively to everyone,” said Bruce
Runberg, associate vice chancellor
for facilities planning and con
struction. “He was good at bring
ing a consensus together for tough
issues.”
Kapp also contributed to the
UNC General Alumni Association
sponsored Histories and Mysteries
SEE HISTORIAN, PAGE 5
“1t ... honor(s) student leadership that
emerges while students are at Carolina
MARGARET JABLONSKI, vice chancellor for student affairs
“I think it’s very true to her orig
inal intention,” said Andy Woods,
student director of the Eve Marie
Carson Scholarship.
Woods said he and Carson dis
cussed how there were not a lot of
merit scholarships based on stu
dents’ time at UNC. He said they
also spoke of how it is hard to show
leadership before junior year.
Halloween
crowd brings
business, risk
BY EMILY STEPHENSON
ASSISTANT CITY EDITOR
Keeping Franklin Street safe
on Halloween matters as much
as the money for some down
town business owners.
“The bottom line is .we do
better business on that night,”
said Pete Dorrance, a member
of the Chapel Hill Restaurant
Group that owns Spanky’s
Restaurant & Bar on East
Franklin Street.
But he said that large crowds
downtown can be dangerous
and that he sometimes feels
uncomfortable working at
Spanky’s late into the night of
the festivities.
“At some point, it prob
ably becomes unmanageable,”
Dorrance said. “It’s kind of tee
tering on that line.”
Town officials, including
Mayor Kevin Foy, hope to answer
annual security concerns down
town by downsizing the tradi
tional event, which regularly
attracts about 80,000 people.
Meg McGurk, assistant
director of the Chapel Hill
Downtown Partnership, said
downtown businesses might
react differently to the proposed
restrictions.
“It’s really a mixed bag,” she
said. “Restaurants and bars do
see a much larger crowd on
Halloween days and evenings.”
“But there are a lot of con
cerns about traffic and safety
later in the evening that cause a
lot of businesses to close earlier
in the day.”
The Chapel Hill-Carrboro
Chamber of Commerce is sur
veying its members and expects
to have information in mid-
September of bxisiness attitudes
towards restrictions.
McGurk said some restaurant
and bar owners particularly
SBP, trustee team up
for year-long study
BY KEVIN KILEY
ASSISTANT UNIVERSITY EDITOR
Student Body President J.J.
Raynor and Trustee John Ellison
have begun a study aimed at
solving enrollment growth, fac
ulty retirement and recruitment
problems.
Their report and recommen
dations are due to the Board of
Trustees in May.
“We want to focus on the one
to two things that this University
can do to make it better tomorrow
than it is today,” Ellison said.
The project was born at former
Chancellor James Moeser’s going
away dinner, where he addressed
the major problems the University
was facing. •
Roger Perry, chairman of
the Board of Trustees, and
Chancellor Holden Thorp
charged Ellijson and Raynor
with soliciting input from the
University community and com
piling recommendations for how
to improve UNC.
“We’ve pretty much left it to
them to set their own process,”
Perry said. “We just want them
to report in every now and
then.”
One of Raynor’s hopes for the
FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 2008
The scholarship will also pay
for a summer program between
the recipient’s junior and senior
year. Applicants will be asked to
describe what they would do with
the summer money.
“The summer is meant for self
development,” said Emir Sandhu,
SEE SCHOLARSHIP, PAGE 5
those in the midst of festivities
on East Franklin Street likely
would oppose crowd restric
tions because of potential profit
losses.
But she said she thinks some
owners of retail shops, hair
salons and other businesses
would have a different outlook
because closing early means they
lose money on Halloween.
And downtown restaurants
and bars don’t all benefit from
the costumed extravaganza
Chapel Hill Restaurant Group
also owns 411 West, which is not
in the midst of Halloween fes
tivities and closes early.
Robert Poitras, owner and
operator of Carolina Brewery
on West Franklin Street, said
his restaurant also closes early
on Halloween.
But while the event alters the
area’s normal business hours, he
said safety issues also concern
him.
“Over time, I worry about the
magnitude of so many people,”
Poitras said. “I support anything
that’s going to make our town
safe.”
Officials have discussed
implementing a curfew, charg
ing an entrance fee and closing
bars early to keep people away
from Franklin Street.
The Apple Chill festival was
cancelled in 2006 after three
people were injured in two
shootings.
“I’m wondering how long
the town can keep doing
(Halloween),” Dorrance said.
“It’s sort of hard for the town
to control who comes to this
event. You kind of wait for the
other shoe to drop at some
point.”
Contact the City Editor
at citydesk@unc.edu.
m
IB
Student Body
President J.J.
Raynor hopes
the resulting
report will
tackle big
UNC issues. 4
study is to establish a tuition
predictability model for UNC, a
major goal of Raynor and past
student body presidents.
“Knowing what’s going to hap
pen in coming years with tuition
is dependant on where we are and
where we are going,” Raynor said.
“And this can help with knowing
that.”
Ellison and Raynor began the
process by meeting with admin
istrators almost all day Tuesday.
They have meetings scheduled
for next Hiesday, Wednesday and
Thursday as well.
Right now they are focusing
on the best way to solicit input,
including designing a Web site
and hosting open forums.
Raynor and Ellison said they
want to have dates set for. open
forums by October.
SEE AUDIT, PAGE 5
    

Page Text

This is the computer-generated OCR text representation of this newspaper page. It may be empty, if no text could be automatically recognized. This data is also available in Plain Text and XML formats.

Return to page view