North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 116, ISSUE 62
me/ |mmWbw
sports | page 14
UNSTOPPABLE
Brandon Tate finished with 397
all-purpose yards —a new
school record and the second
most ever in the ACC —and
scored two touchdowns to
provide the Tar Heels with a
desperately needed spark.
arts | page 6
ARTS INTERNSHIP
Carolina Performing Arts hired
its first interns this summer,
and now wants to create a
formalized internship program.
sports | page 14
STREAK OVER
The No. 1-ranked women's field
hockey team lost to No. 5 lowa.
It was the team's first loss since
the 2006 NCAA Tournament.
university | page .■)
CAROLINA'S SECRET
UNC logos won't appear on
Victoria's Secret loungewear
after Chancellor Holden Thorp
decided against renewing the
contract because of how the
Pink catalog portrays women.
online | dailytarheel.com
FOOTBALL PHOTOS
View some of the best shots
from Saturday's late game.
EDITOR'S NOTES
Response to reader concerns
about firing a columnist.
this day in history
SEPT. 2.1998
The Student Union Board of
Directors votes on whether to
install baby-changing stations
in the men and women's
bathrooms in the Union lobby.
Todays weather
Sunny
H 88, L 63
&
Wednesday’s weather
T-Storms
H 92, L 65
••jga*
index
police log ........2
calendar 2
crossword 8
edit 10
sports 14
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
Slip imlit ®ar Hrri
GUSTAV TOUCHES
[state St. i
Mlßßwifnfßfcf I corFtt 1 m
jSBBBknfL, Ijm, **.
iss® r-'’ M Mu jcr -.-3
ijbhkF '•* jjfcr
PL ;IB
MgM* ilsßr wj| IS •
TOM PENNINGTON/FORT WORTH STAR-TSIEGRAM/MCT
A television photographer walks below the Industrial Cana! which divides the Ninth Ward —as water splashes over the levee
in New Orleans, La., on Monday. The city Weathered the storm well and damage is less severe than after Hurricane Katrina.
Tulane students evacuate, eager to return
BY ARIEL ZIRULNICK
STATE & NATIONAL EDITOR
Hurricane Gustav made landfall Monday
morning only about a week after students
began arriving for the start of the fall semes
ter at Tulane University.
Although the storm center hit about 75
miles southwest of New Orleans, the univer
sity issued a mandatory evacuation on Aug.
28, the second day of classes. Students were
asked to clear campus by noon on Aug. 30.
Most students arranged their own evacu
ation plans, aided by a university shuttle ser
vice to the New Orleans airport.
About 250 students who either could not
afford evacuation costs or did not have a
place to go were bussed to Jackson, Miss.,
where they slept in the gym at Jackson State
University.
“They’ve really come through. It’s not an
easy situation trying to take care of 10,000
students,” said first-year Stephanie Quintero.
The university relied largely on its emer
gency communication Web site, e-mails and
its emergency text messaging system to keep
students abreast of storm and evacuation
developments.
Buzz about the storm began last TXiesday,
Quintero said, although there was initially
George Bush and Vice Pr'esiden/oick Cheney on Monday I ||ll - ..i fStift
f P ane oyem to JacKson, iss., it ey chose o eave. ... j v . ” ’ * ™ ' |
www.dailytarheel.com
GUSTAV RELIEF COLLECTIONS
Dates: Tuesday and Wednesday
Location: Barack Obama's Chapel Hill cam
paign office, 337 W. Rosemary St.
Needed: canned food, bottled water and first
aid supplies.
little talk about evacuation.
“People weren’t talking about it too realis
tically until Wednesday,” said first-year Katie
Brown. “As it became clearer that it was
going to be not only a severe storm, but it
was definitely going to be hitting us that’s
when it became serious.”
Tulane stresses the importance of stu
dents having their own evacuation plans well
in advance of any storm, Quintero said.
Students were asked to leave information
about where they were going, what they were
doing and how they could be reached.
Quintero, who is from Miami, said there
was a big difference in reaction among stu
dents from areas prone to hurricanes and stu
dents who had never experienced one before.
“A lot of people thought it was going to be
Katrina all over again,” she said. “It’s not It’s
nowhere close.”
As of Monday night, the Tulane Web site
reported tree debris and minimal roof dam
age, but no flooding or standing water.
Brown, who comes from Bethesda, Md.,
said that it was hard to grasp the implica
tions of Gustav until it happened, even
though she always knew a hurricane was a
possibility.
“A lot of people were nervous. A hurricane
evacuation is a pretty foreign concept to a lot
of us,” she said. “Although we knew it was
coming, I don’t think we really expected it to
happen. It was really surreal. We didn’t feel
like we were leaving until we were gone.”
Quintero and Brown both said everyone
they have spoken to is eager to get back, and
Quintero said that she has spoken to some
friends about returning earlier to help with
cleanup in harder-hit areas of the city.
Neither has heard of any students
rethinking their enrollment because of the
early scare.
“A lot of freshmen said, ‘lt’s only been a
week, but I couldn’t imagine going anywhere
else,’” Quintero said.
Residence halls will reopen Sunday and
classes will resume Monday.
Contact the State National Editor
atstntdesk@unc.edu.
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2008
HALLOWEEN:
Other
towns
scaled
back
Rowdy streets
prompt action
BY MAX ROSE
CITY EDITOR
It was the morning after the
2005 Halloween celebration, and
the mayor of Madison, Wise., said it
couldn’t continue like before.
For four consecutive years, nights
of looting ended with pepper spray.
“There was just utter bedlam,”
said Mike Hanson, a Madison
police officer. Town officials
decided at a 5 a.m. debriefing that
something was going to change.
They charged admission to get
onto State Street, the Franklin Street
of the University of Wisconsin, and
set up stages for bands and space for
food vendors.
And in the next two years crime
decreased, Hanson said.
The changes in Madison have
greatly altered the event and
received mixed reviews from the
UW students who drive it.
But if Chapel Hill authori
ties are looking for ways to make
Halloween safer, they will likely
SEE HALLOWEEN, PAGE 9
More
lighting
possible
in Coker
Thorp considers
student concern
BY ELISABETH GILBERT
STAFF WRITER
The chancellor’s office is reopen
ing discussion about installing
lights in Coker Arboretum for the
first time in a decade.
Ten years ago, University officials
decided that closing the Arboretum
at night would be sufficient to keep
students safe. But several robberies
and assaults in the early 2000 sand
anew focus on campus safety have
brought the issue to light again.
Chancellor Holden Thorp
announced to guests at his open
forum Tuesday that he would look
into the issue, in response to a stu
dent’s inquiry.
Since then he has contacted North
Carolina Botanical Garden officials,
SEE LIGHTING, PAGE 9
Hi
-
    

Page Text

This is the computer-generated OCR text representation of this newspaper page. It may be empty, if no text could be automatically recognized. This data is also available in Plain Text and XML formats.

Return to page view