North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 116, ISSUE 69
n
diversions | page 5
NOT FOR BARBIE
Roller derby Is increasing in
popularity, in part because
of the Carolina Rollergirls, a
Raleigh group that plays the
contact sport known for its
nicknames and costumes.
arts | page 3
DISTINCTIVE SOUNDS
Carolina Performing Arts' seasoh
starts today with a performance
by the Sparrow Quartet a group
that includes Grammy winner
Bela Fleck.
features | page 3
OLYMPIC SALUTE
Olympic gold medalist Tommie
Smith, who protested civil rights
injustices with his 1968 black
power salute at the Mexico City
games, will speak today at the
Sonja Haynes Stone Center.
online | dailytarheel.com
ARTS FUNDS
Applications for the Performing
Arts and Special Events Fund
are due today.
CONTINUUM REVIEW
A review of PlayMakers' first
performance of the year.
CORRECTION
Due to a reporting error,
the last quote in Wednesday’s
article “Play probes life
of women with HIV” was
incorrectly attributed. The
quote was from Play Makers
managing director Hannah
Grannemann. The Daily Tar
Heel apologizes for the error.
this day in history
SEPT. 11,1989
A hearing is postponed for the
only black female University
police officer, who claimed
that she was not promoted
because of her race.
Today’s weather
Jlfc Drizzle \
H 74, L 66
Friday’s weather
T-storms
H 83, L 69
index
police log 2
calendar 2
nation/world 4
crossword... .9
opinion.' 12
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“There was a lot of potential for positive change that was lost.”
Tar Heel football tackles
primetime spot in N. J.
BY DAVID ELY
SENIOR WRITER
North Carolina sophomore
safety Deunta Williams couldn’t
contain his excitement.
The mere mention of UNC’s
primetime battle against Rutgers
brought a smile to his face and a
twinkle to his eye.
“I’m jacked up I really can’t lie
to you, man,” Williams said. “I’ve
had dreams about it, you know
visions, if you wanna call ’em.”
Today at 7:30 p.m., those
dreams become reality as the Tar
Heels make their national debut
with coach Butch Davis.
And it seems clear that this was
a game circled on the calendar as
soon as the schedule was released.
“I feel like it’s a great opportu
nity for our team for our pro
gram— to go in and make some
big plays and open the eyes of a lot
of guys,” Williams said.
But adrenaline and talk will get
UNC only so far. National games
command big-time opponents,
and that is exactly what the Tar
Heels face in Rutgers.
Despite a disappointing opener
this season, Rutgers coach Greg
Schiario has turned the program
into a Big East powerhouse.
Three straight winning seasons,
highlighted by an 11-win campaign
in 2006, went a long way toward
establishing winning mentality in
Piscataway, N. J.
“You respect the job that Greg
has done, because he’s done a very
good job,” Davis said Monday.
“They struggled in the first cou
ple years as he tried to change die
culture, the environment,... and
here now in year eight, you can
see the by-product of it.”
The size and strength of Rutgers
mark a stark contrast to UNC’s first
opponent, McNeese State.
www.dailytarheel.com
a DTH ONLINE: Check out a
Rutgers podcast from DTH beat
writers at dailytarheel.com.
DTH QNLINE: After the game; visit
dailytarheel.com to read all about it.
Scarlet Knight quarterback Mike
Teel isn’t going to line up in shotgun
and run the spread, and Schiano’s
defense won’t find itself outmanned
to the degree the Cowboys did.
“Rutgers is certainly totally dif
ferent offensively, special teams
wise and defensively,” Davis said.
“Not only do they pose a bigger
challenge, but they are dramati
cally different schematically.
“They are a big pressure defense
they are very fast, they are very
athletic and they’ve got some out
standing defensive linemen that
really, truly create havoc.”
That sounds eerily similar to
descriptions of Davis’ vaunted
defensive units as head coach of the
Miami Hurricanes when Schiano
was his defensive coordinator.
During the two seasons they spent
on the same sideline, Davis tutored'
Schiano on the role of a big-time col
lege coach, preparing his protege to
take over a school of his own.
Now, for the first time, the stu
dent gets his crack at the teacher.
“I’m looking forward to the
game,” Schiano said. “Butch is a
good friend, and I know he’ll have
his team ready.”
Preparation is one thing the Tar
Heels have stressed all week long.
Quarterback T.J. Yates said the
offense has practiced polishing hand
signals and silent snaps in order to
have success moving the ball.
“We’ve been practicing with
crowd noise,” he said. “It gets real
loud, almost extremely loud, out
there, but we want to take it as high
as possible because we want to be
I j j,
DTH FILE PHOTO
When Rutgers came to town in
2006, Hakeem Nicks (88) and
UNC fell to the Knights 21-16.
Now Butch Davis heads up north
in search of his first away win.
prepared for everything.”
North Carolina hopes that
extra work pays off big dividends.
It always hurts to disappoint, but
the pain is especially acute when
in front of the entire country.
As was the case with Rutgers’
win against then-No. 3 Louisville
in 2006, a program can put
itself on the map with a strong
Thursday night performance.
“I think there have been pro
grams in the country that have
done a phenomenal job in capi
talizing on national television
opportunities,” Davis said.
“Sometimes it’s Thursday,
sometimes Saturday, playing bowl
games —anytime you get a chance
to expose the rest of the country to
what you’re trying to do.”
Contact the Sports Editor
at sports@unc.edu.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2008
Union eyes new
late-night dining
BY ELLY SCHOFIELD
STAFF WRITER
The bottom floor of the Student
Union could be remade as a late
night dining option and a center for
leadership opportunities, an archi
tect’s preliminary report states.
Student Union employees
received the report, which discuss
es plans for the renovation of the
Union Underground, on Tuesday.
Though it is a draft report and
hasn’t been reviewed by Union offi
cials, it’s the first tangible plan in a
process slated to last until 2010.
The report was completed by
Clearscapes, a Raleigh architecture
Gage ready to set out
BOG priorities for year
BY ELIZABETH DEORNELLAS
SENIOR WRITER
Hannah Gage is the first woman
to lead the UNC-system Board of
Governors, and today is her first
opportunity to present her vision
for the year.
Gage, a retired broadcasting
executive, shares
UNC-system
President
Erskine Bowles’
tendency to
treat the UNC
system as a busi
ness. Her goal is
THE BOG SAYS
two high-profile
controversies
won't distract it
from starting off.
PAGE 3
to protect the state’s investment in
the system and its students.
“It’s going to be difficult over the
next decade for the state to afford
us,” Gage said.
“The burden is on us to find
ways to save that money.”
Gage will continue efforts to
implement UNC Tomorrow, a sys-
firm, after listening to student and
Union employee input.
“We don’t want this to be the
library,” said Don Luse, director of
the Union. “We want this to be a
place where you want to be.”
Right now, the main ideas being
considered to fill the space are a din
ing area and a leadership center.
Luse said he has been in conver
sation with Carolina Dining Services
to plan the proposed dining area.
Scott Myers, director of food
and vending for Carolina Dining
Services, said there is not yet a
SEE UNDERGROUND, PAGE 11
temwide effort to tailor the uni
versities’ work to the needs of the
state, as well as advancing her own
initiatives.
“There are issues that I would
like to elevate in our conversation,*
she said.
Her focus for the year will be
on improving graduation rates,
strengthening partnerships
between universities and commu
nity colleges and embracing online
education.
“Those are the three things that
I feel will make the biggest differ
ence for the state,” she said.
Today’s slate of BOG meetings
will start with workshpps designed
to provide in-depthjfriformation
about two areas theoard would
like to improve: financial aid and
online education.
Increasing financial aid avail-
SEE GAGE, PAGE 11
    

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