North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 116, ISSUE 91
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sports | page 10
LAST-SECOND WIN
Notre Dame receiver Michael
Floyd's late-game fumble was
just one moment in a series
of big plays and momentum
shifts in Saturday's game.
SportS | page 10
HARD AT WORK
After Virginia Tech scored on
itself for the North Carolina
women's soccer team's first
goal, things would only get
worse for the Hokies.
city | online
THE ENO'S CRITTERS
Giant ladybugs walked down
the street alongside crickets
riding bicycles at the
Handmade Parade on Saturday
celebrating the Eno River.
national | page r>
THE ISSUES: ENERGY
See how policies of presidential
candidates John McCain and
Barack Obama compare on fuel
conservation, alternative energy
and other environmental topics.
online | dailytarheel.com
BLOG: BLOOD, BRUISES
DTH photographers have some
run-ins at the football game.
BLOG: WOOTINI
Musicians present visual works
of art for Carrboro exhibit.
IRON STUDENT
A business school student races
in an Ironman competition.
this day in history
OCT. 13,2003...
Mary Sue Coleman, University
of Michigan's president and a
UNC alumna, delivers the
keynote address at the
100-year anniversary of the
Graduate School.
Today’s weather
Sunny
H 81, L 53
Tuesday’s weather
Sunn y
M 85, L 58
index
police log 2
calendar 2
nation/world 5
opinion 6
crossword 9
sportslo
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
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UNIVERSITY DAY
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Holden Thorp is officially installed Sunday as UNC-Chapel Hill's 10th chancellor at a ceremony on Polk Place. Attending were distinguished alumni as well as community and state
leaders. In his remarks, Thorp focuses on the future of the University. The text in the background of the picture shows the most-used words in his speech, courtesy of Wordle.net.
Thorp’s speech
looks forward
BY ANDREW DUNN
UNIVERSITY EDITOR
On the eve of University Day,
junior Dawson Gage wrote an e-mail
to tell his mother what he likes about
Chancellor Holden Thorp.
“Mom, he’s a brilliant person
who’s chosen to make his life here,
in his home state,” read his mother
Committee clears McClendon
BY KEVIN KILEY
ASSISTANT UNIVERSITY EDITOR
Shaniqua McClendon did not lie
to Student Congress when she pre
sented a Concepts of Colors fund
ing request, the ethics committee
ruled Sunday.
Congress also raised questions
about how its finance committee
scrutinizes requests and said better
evaluation would have prevented
the confusion.
McClendon, treasurer of the mod
eling troupe, was called into question
after Congress members heard that
she told her business class she had
taken advantage of the system.
Last week, Congress decided to
launch an ethics investigation to
clarify McClendon’s story.
The ethics committee decided
that Concepts should resubmit its
request next week to the finance
Scooting service out to prevent drunk driving
DTH/ANTHONY HARRIS
Zingo driver Evan Carter rides a scooter to Franklin
Street after dropping off a client Thursday night.
www.dailytarheel.com
@DTH ONLINE: See a video of
the University Day celebration
and speeches.
INSIDE: Five received the Distinguished
Alumna and Alumnus Award. PG. 8
Hannah Gage, chairwoman of the
Board of Governors, to the crowd
surrounding South Building.
Sunday’s installation of Thorp as
UNC’s 10th chancellor had the air of
a homecoming, despite Thorp hav
ing been on the faculty since 1993.
About 2,750 students, faculty
committee. The original request
was for $7,535, which would come
from student fees.
The main question was whether
the group’s budget asked for more
than was needed, which the com
mittee deemed was an issue for the
finance committee.
But the ethics committee estab
lished that McClendon had been
honest with Congress and had
presented an exaggerated story in
her class.
“Clearly, if I had done this, if I
had been trying to get away with
something, I wouldn’t have admit
ted it to a room of 30 or 40 people,”
McClendon said in the meeting.
Members of the ethics commit
tee also thought a problem was
that the finance committee did not
thoroughly evaluate the request
when it came to them.
BY JOE WOODRUFF
STAFF WRITER
Michael Edmonds stood on Franklin Street
in a bright orange reflective jacket, next to a
matching, comically small motorbike.
The sidewalks had begun filling with dub
goers. In the street, a sedan stopped, music
blasting, before a red light. Rosy-cheeked
passengers sang along, horribly off-key.
“They might be needing our services
right now,” Edmonds said.
Edmonds is a driver for Zingo Designated
Drivers, anew service that gives intoxicated
people a safe way to get their cars home.
Zingo began operating m Chapel Hill in
September and employs a crew of drivers.
Zingo chauffeurs arrive on collapsible
motorbikes, which are then stored in call
ers’ car trunks. The driver takes the cus
tomer home in his or her own vehicle.
A trip with a Zingo driver costs $3 per
mile, plus a $lO pick-up fee.
“It’s also a fun service. It’s much more per
sonal than a ride in ataxi,” said Elliott Pierce,
director of Zingo’s Triangle branch. He over
and alumni attended the installa
tion, falling on the 215th anniver
sary of the University’s founding.
Beforehand, Thorp was com
pared to all kinds of sages, ranging
from University founder William R.
Davie to Yoda from Star Wars.
But foremost in their minds was
the pride of having a chancellor who
graduated from UNC and worked
his way up the faculty ranks.
Thorp graduated in 1986, attend
ed graduate school at Cal Tech and
worked at N.C. State University
“It’s not the responsibility of the
groups to find the lowest price,”
said tepresentative Elizabeth
Humphrey. “I think the onus falls
on the finance committee to better
evaluate the request.”
The recommendations the
committee established included
informing groups of what Congress
examines in requests, increasing
the transparency of the budget sys
tem and asking for more specific
requests from groups.
Meetings of the ethics commit
tee traditionally are held to deal
with Congress’ internal issues.
The Student Code states that
the committee has the authority to
investigate violations of the Honor
Code by members of Congress,
violations of Congress’ ethics laws
SEE ETHICS, PAGE 7
sees 10 bikes, split between both locations.
He said Chapel Hill is an obvious place
to offer a designated driving service.
“It’s definitely a big party town, people
do a lot of drinking and partying,” Pierce
said. “We thought the Triangle area would
be a great place to bring the service.”
UNC sophomore Alex Hunt said a des
ignated driving service could be popular on
Franklin Street, especially when bars close.
“I’ve driven down Franklin Street in the
early morning, and judging by the number
of people I’ve seen getting DUIs, I think it’s
a very good idea,” Hunt said.
The benefits of designated drivers are
clear, said Nick Stroud, manager of Jack
Sprat Cafe. Stroud estimates that 25 percent
of his patrons arrive at the cafe by car.
“Someone that would come to drive an
intoxicated person home would be much
better than that person driving themselves,”
Stroud said.
But he said he worries that the availabil-
SEE ZINGO, PAGE 7
before returning to UNC.
“You spread your wings, flew
away and tore the Tar Heel tether
in two,” said Joe Templeton, chair
man of the faculty. “Then you chose
to return. Thank you.”
In his first big speech, Thorp
forsook the traditional historical
retellihg of the University’s past,
instead opting for a comedic two
paragraph abridged version.
“I need my time today to talk
about the future,” he said.
Though his speech did not break
The story so far
Sept. 30: Shaniqua
McClendon and Anna Bays
present Concepts of Colors'
funding request to the finance
committee of Student Congress.
Oct 2: For class assignment
McClendon discusses what
occurred at the finance commit
tee meeting. She said she used
the real event but tailored details
to make a more compelling
story. Two students later report
the story to Student Congress
Speaker Tim Nichols.
liuMday: The funding request
comes before the full Congress,
which delays voting on the
request until the ethics
committee can investigate the
conflicting stories.
MONDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2008
much new ground, Thorp clearly
enunciated three key goals for UNC:
to recruit top undergraduate and
graduate students, to attract talented
faculty who can teach and research
and to elevate the region and state.
All three were connected, but
each had specific tactics.
The first goal can be achieved
by revamping academic programs
to make them more attractive to
students’ interests and offering
SEE UNIVERSITY DAY, PAGE 7
Voter
drives
yield
results
County expects
record turnout
BY DAVID ELY
SENIOR WRITER
When voter registration closed
Friday, the UNC Young Democrats
had topped their goal 0f5,500 new
registrations on campus.
Their total was 5,642 registra
tions —and 1,260 of those were
between Monday and Thursday of
last week.
If num
bers from the
Chapel Hill
Barack Obama
campaign office
are included,
election
2008
that number is easily at 6,000,
said Young Democrats co-director
Vivek Chilukuri.
Neither reflects the drove of vot
ers off campus who have registered
this election season.
With a little more than three
weeks remaining until Election
Cay, the Orange County Board
of Elections is bracing itself for a
busy Nov. 4.
“We’re expecting a record num
ber of turnout,” said director TYacy
Reams.
Tb deal with crowds that could
threaten to overwhelm local voting
sites, the board has undertaken
measures to ensure Election Day
goes smoothly.
SEE REGISTRATION, PAGE 7
    

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