North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 116, ISSUE 93
VOTING BEGINS
Early and one-stop voting
begins Thursday at five sites
in Orange County. Early
voting is available through
Nov. 1 and Election Day is
Nov. 4. See pg. 4 for a list of
races on the ballot.
State | page 3
LAWSON DEBATES PRICE
Dr. B.J. Lawson, a Republican,
is challenging U.S. Rep. David
Price, D-N.C, for his District 4
seat. The Dialectic and
Philanthropic Societies
organized Tuesday's debate.
announcements
FALL BREAK BEGINS
The DTH will resume
publication on Monday.
TAKE A DTH SURVEY
Be entered to win SSOO in
prizes. Visit www.dailytarheel.
com/survey today.
GOT A GREAT COSTUME?
Seeking creative students
and community members
to model their Halloween
costumes for the Oct. 21
Tuesday Focus. Contact
Features Editor Nate Hewitt
at nathadhewitt@gmail.com
if interested.
online | Uailytarheel.com
BLOG: BICYCLE PUN
Carrboro residents give their
opinions about the proposal.
TAR HEEL BUSINESS
Seniors create magazine to
explain economic issues.
CYBER STALKING
Speakers warn students about
Internet abuse and predators.
this day in history
OCT. 15 f 1992 ...
UNC's water ski club team
heads to the U.S. National
Championship after a second
place finish in the 14-team
South Atlantic Conference.
Today s weather
O Sunny
H 88, L 62
Thursday s weather
O Sunny
H 88, L 62
index
police log 2
calendar 2
nation/world 8
sports 11
crossword 11
opinion 12
(Tltp iatly ®ar Mrrl
ALL EYES ON HAKEEM
Nicks steps up as
go-to playmaker
INSlDE:’Virginia running back Cedric
Peerman will be the UNC defense's
biggest challenge Saturday. SEE PG. 11.
BY POWELL LATIMER
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
Hakeem Nicks barely makes
it out of the locker room Tuesday
before a camera’s in his face and he’s
being directed for a photo shoot
Nicks takes it all in stride the
light, the flashes from the camera;
he even manages to ask when and
where the shots are running with
out breaking the photographer’s
rhythm.
It’s obvious the junior wideout
welcomes the spotlight which
is good, because it’s going to be
focused intensely on him for the
rest of the season.
With Nicks’ running mate wide
out, Brandon Tkte, out for the season,
defenses know exactly where the ball
is going: the XXL hands of No. 88.
Nicks, who wears the largest
sized gloves offered (he says they
still don’t fit), has always wel
comed that attention.
In the preseason, he casually
dropped phrases such as “national
championship” and “Heisman.”
SEE NICKS, PAGE 9
UNC scrambling for returns, receptions after Tate’s injury
BY RACHEL ULLRICH
SPORTS EDITOR
Butch Davis knows it won’t be easy.
“We don’t just have another Brandon Tkte
that you just take off the shelf and plug him
into the game,” he said Monday.
But somehow, some way, the Tar Heels
have to replace Tkte. And fast.
With the senior playmaker lost for the sea
son with ACL and MCL tears, Davis has to fill
the roles Tkte has excelled in all season.
And with the Virginia game looming, just
one guy isn’t going to do it
“We talk about him providing almost 100
yards a game, from wherever he’s coming,”
quarterback Cameron Sexton said. “And I
think other people filled that role (Saturday)
with 30 yards here, there.”
Hakeem Nicks kicked it up a notch this
weekend; he and Brooks Foster will both
State Fair goes green this year
Recycling facilities join fried candy
BY ALU YINGLING
STAFF WRITER
Starting Thursday, fun-seekers
can head to Raleigh for the annual
N.C. State Fair.
The fair will have its usual quirks,
including a demolition derby, a con
test for animal sculptures, a pump
kin growing contest, carnival rides
and its notorious deep-fried foods.
But it will also feature fresh per
formances and anew emphasis on
sustainability efforts.
“It’s a really good showing of
everything North Carolina has to
offer,” said first-year Chelsea Miller.
Natalie Alford, public infor
mation officer for the State Fair,
said they’re aiming for 1 million
attendees this year up from the
857,000 people last year.
Attendees can enjoy everything
from a BMX bike show to the world’s
largest portable roller coaster, she
said. Alford said she is personally
most excited about the 115 rides that
will the fair will feature this year.
UNC students echoed that sen
timent, citing the drop tower and
the Vortex as two rides they are
most excited about. Others said
Luxury good retailers say business is steady
BY WHITNEY BAKER
STAFF WRITER
Established customers remain
faithful to retailers that sell luxu
ry goods even as walk-in business
declines in response to the eco
nomic downturn. '
Although the number of first
time shoppers is on the decline,
longtime patrons are still loyal
to local businesses that sell items
such as jewelry, name-brand cloth
ing and automobiles.
Store owners say they focus
on developing relationships with
customers and cater to wealthy
patrons.
“Because we’re 30 years here
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
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PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY EMMA PATTI
Hakeem Nicks, junior wideout, will have to shoulder an even heavier offensive load this weekend against Virgina. "He's been the one really solid,
consistent, week-in and week-out player," coach Butch Davis said. "You can always count on Hakeem to deliver this kind of performance."
help fill the receiving void.
But the return game remains the biggest
problem for the Tar Heels. Without Tkte, UNC
has eight total punt return yards in 2008.
Though the kick return game is slightly
better off, Tkte still makes up more than half
of the team’s kickoff return yardage.
Against Notre Dame, Tate returned the
only punt by the Irish. After he was injured,
fullback Bobby Rome and cornerback
Johnny White each returned one kickoff
while Nicks returned two.
Combined, the trio totaled 82 yards for
an average of 20.5 That’s almost 7 yards less
than Tkte’s usual clip.
“Johnny White has a lot of speed,” Nicks
said. “He definitely could return the ball.”
And, Nicks pointed out, he’ll still be back
deep as well, and he’s confident Tate isn’t the
only guy who can take returns to the house.
ATTEND THE N,C. STATE FAIR
Tiww 3 p.m. to midnight Thursday;
8 a.m. to midnight Friday until Oct. 26
location: 1025 Blue Ridge Road,
Info?www.ncstatefair.org/2008
they have a fondness for the swings
and the swinging pirate ship ride.
But the fair offers more than just
rides, Alford said.
This year, some of the fair’s big
gest acts will be musical artists
Mario, Toby Mac and Montgomery
Gentry. All three will be performing
in Dorton Areng on the fairgrounds
during the fair’s 10-day run.
Miller said she’s excited to see
Montgomery Gently with her fam
ily —but other students said they
are particularly excited about stuff
ing themselves with fair food.
Vendors are known somewhat
unconventional fried foods such as
candy and Coke. Miller said she’s a
fan of the fried pickles.
Senior Ben Mancheril said the
blooming onion is his big draw.
“That’s basically my only attrac
tion to going to the fair,” he said.
and with the Internet, I’m not see
ing any effect,” said Kim Maitland,
co-owner of Creative Metalsmiths,
a gallery that sells handmade items
by artists from across the country.
Maitland said her business has
not been threatened because it
caters a specialized good that cannot
be recreated by mass production.
Retailers that sell luxury goods
in the area are holding their own
despite the value of people’s assets
going down.
“People who are after high-end
items still have their wealth,” UNC
economics professor Stanley Black
said. They are less likely to see a
noticeable change in wealth as
“Oh, I definitely think I could.”
But the fact remains that Tate’s loss is sig
nificant for both the Tar Heels’ offensive and
special teams units.
“Guys have just got to step up,” Nicks said.
“I don’t have any doubt in my mind that
Brooks will be able to step up and carry the
load. Cooter Arnold’s got to step up, Kenton
Thornton.”
Tate, for one, believes they can do it.
“Oh, we’ve got playmakers on the roster,” he
said. “Y all will see Saturday against Virginia”
First-year Dwight Jones has also been
mentioned as a player who might see time in
Tkte’s absence, and Kendric Burney sat deep
for a kickoff return against Notre Dame.
All of these decisions will be made during
practice this week and by talking to players
about roles they could fill, Davis said.
Sexton said he knows offensive coordina-
\ TA- — jMrr-mf" 1 —i
DTH FILE/KATE NAPIER
Visitors enjoy “The Claw,* one of the many thrill rides at the North
Carolina State Fair in Raleigh last fall. The fair starts Thursday.
This year, the fair also will have
some environmentally friendly
features. Alford said they will be
collecting vegetable oil from the
vendors and donating it to biod
iesel research facilities.
There will be four trial recycling
facilities the first time the fair
will make any recycling efforts.
“We have plans to get greener
opposed to people who are losing
jobs, he said.
People want items that will hold
value, said Linda Romberg, owner
of Minata Jewelers.
Higher-end purchases are likely
to be treasured longer or kept in
the family as heirlooms, she said.
Retailers have been able to main
tain relationships with old custom
ers, but some have seen a decrease
in spontaneous shoppers.
“You don’t see the walk-in traffic
that you might,” Maitland said.
Minata Jewelers, in University
Mall, has had a drop-off in the
sales of gift goods in the SSO to
$l5O range, which is in the lower
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2008
and greener,” Alford said.
Veteran fair attendees have rec
ommendations for the experience.
“I would say get there early,
go with a bunch of people and
try everything they have to eat,”
Mancheril said.
Contact the State Cf National
Editor at stntdesk@unc.edu.
range of its merchandise.
“I think people are cautious,”
Komberg said. “We’re not making
frivolous purchases.”
Customers buying luxury goods
do so based on the reputation of
the goods they want to purchase.
“We haven’t really seen a
decline, because we sell highline
cars,” said Jill Mccullough, mar
keting director at Performance
Acura in Chapel Hill.
Their number one franchise is
BMW, she said, and customers
shopping for BMWs know exactly
what they like and specifically
SEE LUXURY GOODS, PAGE 9
FOLLOW THtBAMI
Tim* 3:30 p.m. Saturday
IV! ABC
Rdte! WCHL 1360 AM; WRDU 106.1 FM
lnvftt- www.tarheelblue.com
tor John Shoop will make it happen.
“There’s plenty of guys to fill those roles.
Coach Shoop will draw up an unbelievable
number of ways to get the ball out there.”
But for now, Davis is staying mum on the
specifics.
“Well, we’ve got some ideas,” he said. “But
rather than fax ’em to you and to (Virginia
coach) A1 Groh, we thought we’d maybe sit
on them, you know?”
Contact the Sports Editor
at sports@unc.edu.
Deaths
spark
athletic
review
Proposed law will
require trainers
BY VICTORIA STILWELL
STAFF WRITER
Several Orange County Schools
may have to change their policies
concerning athletic trainers in
order to comply with a law pro
posed in the wake of deaths like
that of Chapel Hill High School
student Atlas Fraley.
“We’ve had three very unfor
tunate and possibly preventable
deaths here in the state of North
Carolina in the last six weeks,”
said Kevin Guskiewicz, chairman
of UNC’s Department of Exercise
and Sports Science.
Fraley died in August after
complaining of headaches and
body cramps following a football
scrimmage.
Matt Gfeller of R. J. Reynolds
High School in Winston Salem, and
Jaquan Waller of J.H. Rose High
School in Greenville also died after
football-related incidents this year.
Last week, Guskiewicz and
Frederick Mueller, director of the
National Center for Catastrophic
Sports Injury Research and a UNC
professor, put forth a proposal to
the N.C. High School Athletic
Association that would require
high schools in the state to hire a
full-time certified athletic trainer.
Mueller and Guskiewicz say that
schools should require a nationally
certified trainer who doesn’t have
classroom responsibilities.
“The problem is most of the
trainers are full-time teachers,”
Mueller said.
SEE TRAINERS, PAGE 9
    

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