North Carolina Newspapers

    From our European Correspondent
"London and its Curiosities."
Mksib. Editors : Perhaps the lat-
ed to the memory of great men of all
professions. It would be difficult for
me to describe them all. Most famil
iar to an American are those of Gen.
the moat (now filled) which goes around
the tower and opens into the river.
This moat is crossed by a drawbridged
which can suddenly be raised in case of
emenrency. The annals or the tower are
replete with gloomy events. A detailed
-- - l I xwjcss WllU iCLk Uuu iMiuuiuro; oir .eai-
trr rein or me ucscriDiion oi iii.v vuv- i -ri, i . -kt, va.i.
age irom cw iu iu uuuu, VPu and that of Cornwallis whose ga- account of it would mi volumes all
ILshcd in the Telegram) was too much Iant decda in India inscribed on his that I can attempt is to recall the recol-
numcu, but i am ccruun mai in aux- monnracntt nothing being sai(
ietv to sec hind, will excuse us from ex- Araerican history (Yorktown) but
iKiwauiiKui i" t .7 quie8cal tn pace."
coasts of England, when it is consider- Jt wag that j 4
en that we nau occn at jx. lounwu
long da vs. In parsing up the i.ngllsh
Channel we sailed so near the shore
that we had a good view of Hastings,
where .William the Conqueror landed
and fought his first battle, In 10GG
Also Brighton, the fashionable English
watering place. It was quite dark when
we arrived off the celebrated Castle of
Dover. We came to anchor near .Mar-
view of the city by going up to the top
of thedome,but as there was no engine to
hoist me, I concluded to travel in the
othci direction. Having paid the door
keeper six-pence I was allowed to go
down Into the vaults, where I found a
guide ready to show and explain to me,
wliatever I wished to see. I asked to
bo shown where Nelson the naval hero
said of lection of a few historical facts. The
history is sad enough. I could not help
but pause before Traitors Gate a gate-
get a good way which opens into. me Thames and
gate, in the mpntn 01 inc 1 names, uiero sorcophagus of black marble. It is very
not being sulhcient water in the river fino nfiwna nrim-nniiv fntomlM-l for
at low tide to cro further, . c were un-
fine. and was orirfnally intended for
and prepared by order of Cardinal
WooLsey for his own interment. , On
top of the tomb are these words :
HORATIO VISCOUNT NELSON.
His remains are deposited underneath
it. Close by we see the tomb of the
man who so effectually checked Bona
parte, and gave a long peace to Europe.
Both as a statesman and soldier, the
Duke of Willington receives the great
ful admiration of his countrymen.
Everywhere can bo seen testimonials
erected to his memory. He is buried
in a porphyry tomb, in a sarcophagus
of very plain workmanship, j In an
adjoining apartment is the gorgeously
decorated car used at the public funeral
of the hero of Waterloo. Although
specially cautioned not to put my hands
on anv of these tombs. I could not help
class coach but the nobility and those touching them. It was now G o'clock
derweierh at daylijrht next morning,
steaming up the noble Thames. Pass
ing Graves End we arrived at the Vic
toria Docks, Blackwall, the end of our
travel by boat. After having our "box
es" searched for cigars, English reprints,
Ac, we were allowed to go ashore,
where we found ourselfsurrounded by
a high wall, through the gates of which
we could not pass until we had walked
a mile, in the rain too, to -a police sta
tion and paid each person six-pence, a
fee required for landing. Some of the
Americans said many cuss words about
having to walk so far8. We now went
to the Railway station and bought tick
ets for London, eight miles distant.
Very soon the train arrived. In Eng
land there are three classes of cars. As
a jrenerai thin.?, no one taKes a nrst
who. wish to throw away money. The
second class is almost as good and much
cheater the third class have common
lynches and the fare is less than half.
The coaches here are different from
those in America ; being only about
one-third as long, and each one is di
vided into three apartments eight
seats in each apartment. The steps are
on the sides, and people get in and out
there instead of at t lie ends, as in our
American cars. All railroads in Eng
land have a continuous rail (by fasten
ing) in consequence of which the cars
ride very easy; there is no jostling
- whatever. With this exception our
traveling accommodations are superior
to the English. After going over the
tops of many houses we arrived at Fen
rhurch .St. Station in the heart of Lon
don ! Liondon," the largest city in the
world ! Ijondon, the centre of the com-
'merce of the world! London, the fi
nancial centre of the world ! And what
-Ise could be wiid of it? In no other
rity are so many distinct asicct.s pre
sented; in no other city are so many
different traits and peculiarities notice
able; nootliercity ixjssesses the wealth,
ihe iiniortaneoni:(l the abounding poi
nlatinn for which it is noted. To Lon-
Ion, as the true centre of the world,
ome sliips fr:i: all c'inies,bearing the
:nductions of nature, the results of la
ior and the fruits of commerce. Sci
"ence, art and invention seek it as their
home.
To visit London and to carry back to
far off homes some pleasant memories
and some profitable facts seems to be
the reasonable wish of hundreds; and
once within the city every stranger en
deavors to accomplish- the greatest
amount of sight-seeing in the shortest
space of time, and in the mast econom
ical manner.
London lies principally in a valley
surrounded by gently rising hills. It
is situated about si xly miles from the
sea on the river Thames, which divides
it into unequal halves. The northern
half contains the principal public build
ings, the southern being occupied chief
ly with manufactories. The city is
built generally of brick. The houses
are very low, scarcely more than two
stories in height, of a sombre and rath
er dingy look, caused by the use of
larsre quantities of coal fuel. Thestreets
are well paved and the city generally
clean.
The number of inhabitants within
Ixmdon is about 3,400,000 a popula
tion perfectly Chinese in its density.
Perhaps no city has had more writ
ten about it, than London. All classes
of writers have exulted in its greatness.
Its praises have been celebrated in
verse. Southey calls it,
"A
time for closing the gates, and happily
for us. we had seen all of St. Paul. Sat
isfied with what we had this day seen,
we bent our steps towards the Ander
ton Hotel.
Next morning having decided to go
to a place of amusement ,
CRYSTAL PAIiACE.
We went to the station where we found
an immense crowd going there.it being
festival day. It may be well for me to
mention here, that all the great festi
vals are held at Crystal Palace. The
Palace, Park and Fountains are quite
new, having been designed and laid
out in 18o2. The main building is a
parallelogram 1000 feet
;J00 feet wide. It is an immense build
ing wholly of iron and glass hence the
name Crystal. It is difficult to con
ceive how such slender pillows j can be
made to support i such a great veight.
The interior is divided into .various
through -t which ail prisoners were
brousrht from Westminstes afler their
trial. How many illustrious persona
ires have passed under its portals to ex
change the dreams of honor and glory
for the stern realities or a torture room,
and that ratal diock and axe. we see
all around the gloomy prisons where
illustrious personages have sighed out
a lifetime. We are at the Chapel with
in which the bodies of those prisoners
moulder in the dust. 1 cannot recall
the names of the many Britons who
have from time to time been incarcera
ted within these walls. Many a Scots
man too, chafed within the dismal
dungeons of this fortress. I need only
mention the names of Hanoi, of Bruce,
and of the noble Wallace who suffered
a cruel imprisonment and terrible death.
I was taken into the chilly, damp lit
tle room, about ten feet square, in which
was confined Sir Walter Raleigh, the
settler of Roanoke Island. Here he
wrote liis history of the world. In the
centre of this same room are the vari
ous instruments of torture, the original
heading axe, and the block on which
AhnejUoleyn and two other of the
wives of Henry VIII were beheaded
the marks made by the axe are very
distinct. In the Bloody tower was con
fined Mary, Queen of the Scots, Cran
mer and others. In Buwyer tower tra
dition says the Duke of Clarence was
drowned in a butt of Malmsey wine.
At the foot a narrow, winding, stair
case i3 supposed to be the place where
the two royal children were murdered
byi order of Richard III. Many inter
esting inscriptions may be seen writ
tep upon the walls of the prison by its
despondent inhabitants. One said to
have been traced by Lady Jane Grey
with a pin, on the walls in the room
which she was confined, reads thus :
'To mortal's common fate thy mind re-
sign,
. My lotto-day, to-morrow ma' be thine."
The tower is now used as an Armory.
by about j Here is the old armor worn in the days
of Chivalry. In the liorse Armory are
the Knights of the different periods"
mounted on horse, in full armor. This
old armor is very heavy, and presents
a curious spectacle to the people of our
day. I noticed one capa pied suit made
apartments.and the arrangement of the for Henry VIII when he was 18 years
1 The scat where Knirk
contents is in a great measure governed
by these divisions. The centre transept
is the region of amusement and enjoy
ment. Under the prodigious dome is
the vast Handel Orchestra. There are
also numerous theatres and side shows
where one can see anything from a
monkey show to an opera." Here is a
collection of the fine arts of all coun
tries; nature In her finestforms is
everywhere around. The several di
visions into which the Palace is divided
arc termed Courts and the small spaces
intervening between the Courts are call
ed vestibules. Ilrst of all is the Egyp
tian Court, with its curious specimens
of ancient art from Egypt we go to
the Greek Court. Here also, We find
the Greek art tastefully displayed. The
model of the Parthenon is very nice.
The transition from the Greek to the
Tloman is less sudden than from the
Egyptian to the Greek. Indeed it is
scarcely a transition at all. The ancient
ltomaiis were warriors and men of
business, all 1he art leing copied from
Greek modelri, modified only) by the
different circumstances of the two peo
ple. The centre of the Roman Court is
occupied with models of the structures
of the "Eternal City." On the one
hand is the Forum, the snot in which
the great meetings took place ; on the
other hand are the Colosseum and Pan
theon, not in their present ruined state
bus as they formerly stood. We pass
on the Alhambra Court, as a reproduc
tion of a portion of the great j palace
erected in Spain by the Moors. The
design of this Hall is one of the most
beautiful things I ever saw. We see
slender golden pillars, brigh colors, the
shrubs and flowers of a garden. It is
perfectly magnificent.
On entering the Pompeion Court we
are warned by the celebrated word
"Core Caneni," written above the door.
Next we come to the Tropical Depart
ment, the Byzantine Courty the Me
deieval Court, and so on until jwe get
to the Monkey House, which; never
fails to attract a crowd. There are also
numerous shops in which you can buy
anything from a carriage to a jewsharp.'
Quality, novelty and varity- cannot be
exceeded elsewhere. Out in the Park
may be seen the great water-works and
fountains. There is a large lake con
taining three islands wholly occupied
by life-sized models of the ugly, gigan
tic animals of the ancient world. There
all the principal features of geology are
found displayed in such a practical
manner that any one can easily study
the characteristic points of, that useful
branch of the history of nature. Here
is also said to be the largest educational
model ever attempted in any part of
the world. It consists of all the rocks
that constitute the known portion of
spacious city,
;nu lrom her ancient
reim
I).)th rulo tho ocean as her own domain."
Although the true origin of London
is not known, It was probably founded
lcfbre the Christian Era. . My history,
tolls me that it was fortified by the
Unmans in the year 50. Tacitus in the
year 01 describes the London of that
day, as "the great mart of trade and
commerce." It is not my purpose to
tell of London as it was, but as it is.
Before I left the ship I made an
agreement with too other gentlemen to
see Ixmdon together. Singularly
enough we were total strangers, from
the three corners of America; i.e. New
York, California and North Carolina.
As a matter of course our first impulse
was to find a hotel. We lodged at the
Andcrton in Fleet street. We now
began to consider what place we should
see first, but before starting out in the
wilderness, we must select a landmark.
This we found in the dome of St. Pauls
Cathedral, which is discernible in near
ly every part of the city. As St. Pauls croquet ground. v ft saw me old j. j.t js a quaint looking, dilapidated,
was near our hotel, and it being, the ngiisn game 01 rop-iianuKercmei, 0id WOoden chair. My curiosity be-
comincr so much excited I took a seat
in it in order to see if it was different
old. The "weight of the suit is 92 pounds.
After taking a look at the Crown Jew
els (In. Jewel Tower) consisting in part
of the Queen's Crown, (said to be worth
onemillion dollars) the Kahinoor dia
mond, the largest in the world; we
were content to follow our guide to the
gate and , make our exit.
That night we went to the
i 1 ; AI.ilAMKIA,
where we were charmed with the 1111:
sic and plays, viz : The beauties of the
Harem, in which MclUe Rita Sangalli
appeared with 150 ladies of the Corps
de Ballet. The performances closed
with VGod save the Queen" by the Or
chestra.
: Next morning we went to Westmin
ster Abbey. Here is this huge struct
ure,' the sacred depository of fame and
trraudeur, 1 t could trace mankmo
through all the wilderness of their frail
ties and misfortunes from time imme
morial to to-day and reflect on the
shortness of my existence in meditating
on the: mementoes of immortality be
fore me. Here lies the great and ambi
tious, both kings and subjects poets,
statesmen and philosophers heroes,
novelists and divines all mouldering
in one common grave mother earth.
With JEnfflishmen it has always been a
great ambition to be buried m West
minster. The srreat Nelson, after he
had won the battle of Aboukir, is said
to have exclaimed, "an Earldom and
Westminster." Nevertheless he was
buried in St. Pauls.
! History is in doubt as to the exact
time of the foundation of the Abbey
though the first Abbey on this spot is
supposed to have been erected by King
Sebert in the Cth century and said to
have been consecrated by St. Peter him
self. It was rebuilt by both .Edward
the Confessor and then by Henry III in
the 16th century, and was intended by
him as the burial place of only those of
royal blood. The form is that or a cross.
The' interior is superbly ornamented
with costly guilding, delicate carving
and fine steined glass windows. After
procuring our tickets a verger took us
around and explained everything to us
-1 j t rrrt 1 ?,f? j -1 1
in ueian. iie Dunuings is uiviueu in
to various apartments, called transepts,
Chapels, &c. In the large Chapel di
yine service is held every day. I had
the pleasure of attending service in
Westminster. There is three distinct
organs, all connected and worked by
one person. The small Chapels are oc
cupied with the tombs of royal persons.
In- the Chapel of St. Edward i3 the an
cient shrine of that Saint, erected to re
ceive his remains, by Henry III. In
this Chapel is also kept the Coronation
Chairs, (two) one of which was brought
from Scotland by Edward I in the year
rian notoriety. I could have f sperit
days in this venerable old church pon
dering its historical contents,) but my
time would not admit of it, sol bade
adieu to the Abbey. I . ; ! - " - .
I could write much more about what
I have seen in London, but : I have i
already exceeded , the bounds at first
intended and must conclude in a few
words. . . i : !
Bar shops in London are kept j exclu
sively by women, and there is very
little drunkenness and rowdiness ob
servable on the streets and elsewhere.
Now Messrs. editors, I think this is one
good reason why women should i be al
lowed to vote, hold office and court. I
insist that it would have a moral effect
upon men. We would have j less pro
fanity, drinking and perhaps there
would not be so many old maids. But
l must not allow myself to be thus in
veigled into politics and drawn from
my subject. M
In conclusion I will say that I was
more particularly impressed with the
immensity of London than anything
else. Of course we in America cannot
presume to possess such historical me
mentoes as these people for 1. history
is the result of time. We are a new
worlct anew people. The only way
I can conceive a city in America equal
to London is to place Washington with
its public buildings within New !York
city and join Brooklyn and Jersey
city. We would then hav
London in the beauty a
buildings and its populati
More anon.
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hour for Choral service of which 1 had
heard so much ; wo decided to go there
first.
Now I Tam well aware that many
reams of paper have been written by
correspondents about tho great Pro
testant Cathedral of St. Paul, therefore
I feel as if I was touching a hackneyed
subject. It ranks next to St. Peters .at
Rome as a Cathedral, being the second
largest in the Vorld: AVhile St. Peters
was building many popes and archi
tects t passed away. St. Pauls is the
work of a single architect in a single
reign, having been only. 35 years in
course of construction. This great
building rears its splendid proportions
over the ashes of many churches. Fire
seems to have been its greatest enemy.
The present church is the fifth which
has beep built upon the same spot, all
the others having been destroyed by
fire. The outside of the church pres
ents a singular appearance; it was
built of white stone, and like all the
the ladv droDS a handkerchief, and the
gentleman vho first catches her; gets a
kiss, and vice versa. I did not take a
part in it for fear the ladies would all
want to kiss me. 1
No hurried view of this vast assem
blage of art will satisfy the curiosity or
enable tne spectator to appreciate its
beauties, i lie might well spend ."weeks
and in so doing acquire an amount of
knowledge which books, in the absence
of such illustrations, would fail to im
part. .
Uired and wearied out by continued
walking we went to the Station and
took the train for the West End of Lon-
from others, but I was soon admonish
ed by the Verger, that I would be com
pelled to leave the Abbey, if such a
thing occurred again. Under the chair
is also the very identical stone (so says
the. Verger) said to have been used by
Jacob in the Holy Land as a pillow.
In this same Chapel is a rough tomb of
slabs or marble which encloses the
body of Ed ward I of whom I have just
spoken -Long-shanks I believe was his
A Tr Y A i i f
nicK-iianie.j xxis romo wasopeneum
the year 1772, by a party of Antiquari-
flns nnrl thr rwvlv was nfrfpft.. ftftpr n.
aon. Alter a relresmng night's Sleep twfrvl nf mnrt than SOU wnrs TMinn
nt tr Tio V?cfrMto 1 mnnnmnnt rf I T .11 . t .T a 1
or ten omer t;napeis ueoicaiea 10 va-
we went to the historical monument of
Great Britain. I speak of
THE TOWER OF IX)NDON.
Dark shadows of the past enshroud
the gloomy building, but they throw
into bolder relief the intelligence and
refinement which illuminate our day.
nous saints open to the ambulatory
round the chair, a description of their
contents would be too extensive. Crom
well and several of his family were
buried in the Chapel of Henry VII,but
were exhumed after the restoration of
other buildings in London, is partially durincr their wars with the Saxons.
smoked. It is yet incomplete only the I We were conducted through every por-
main part being ued. The windows tion of the Tower by wardersJ who
wore quite an odd dress ana High
M ' 1
The Tower was erected by the Normans I Charles II. The Abbey contains the
with one exception have ordinary glass
in them, that one hasvery fine stained
glass in it. Of the two t,nvexs only
one has a clock in .it yet. ? The dome
rises from the inter-section of the nave
and transept. I learned that it is to
cocked hat, but were quite civil in char
acter. The main Tower, called White
Tower, is the form of. a rectangle, each
corner of which is surmounted Dy a
watch tower. A stone embattled wall,
many Dukes.
1 Since the time of Henry VIII the
J-oyal family have been buried at
Windsor Castle. The South Transept
pr JFoets corner is appropriated to the
reception of monuments . and mortal
i-elics of pots and men of letters. Here
are memorials of Addison. "Rare old
be guilt at an immense outlay of mon- 40 feet high and 12 feet thick surrounds Ben Johnson" Sheridan and a host of
,ey. The steps of the church are very this Tower and the inner ward. J others. Charles Dickens, too. is buried
much worn bv use. every stransrer in It is connected with and defended by here.1 : In the North Transept are buri-
Lonaon goes to see SL Pauls. On en- twelve strong towers, standing at. me
tering the interior I was surprised to equal distances apart. These towers
find it entirely destitute of ornament are very conspicuous, and are known as
everything being of the simplest work- Bloody Tower, Bell Tower, Ac j Out
manship. Here arc monuments erect- side of this is another wall and next is
ed Statesmen. Here lies Pitt and close
beside him, his illustrious rival Fox,
also Wilberforce, Canning and Grat
tan. 'In the North aisle is a monument
to tlnp memory of Maj. Andre of Anse-
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at i
RALEIGH
marching on, and will positively exhibit
SATURDAY, OCT. 21, 1871.
Don't confound this gigantic organization with any other
show bearing' tho name of Robinson, for it i3 in no way,
shape, or manner connected with any or either ofUhcin, but
it is the ONLY ORIGINAL OLD JOHN RQUINSON,
who has owned land managed shows for the past Jifty years,
through tho Southern country, and lias spent ydars of toil
and vast sums bf money to bring his monster! Museum.
Menagerie, Carkvan and Circus to the high -statejof perfec
tion wmcn u now asfeumes,
The Challange Champion Show
N. B. TO LOVERS OF FINE HORSES,
collection of thorough-bred imported Horses
magnificent Andalusian, and th high mettled
The only ono .on oxhibition in !
f ,. . -. 1
" -i , i 4 ' ? ' ' V'" " .
j.1 It f
i , I
bf .the World.
DR. CROOK'S COMPOUND I I F
i SYRUP OF POKE ROOT.
Builds up Constitutions
broken down from
Mineral or Mercurial Poisons.
5ES. The particular attention of stock rajsers and every one else is called to tho splendid
3S and Pomes, fiom almost every clime uhder tho sun. Tho beautiful vi tnX i i
led harb1 of the deserts may bo found amoL the tnIffin.."1?t !W
this monster show, and the proprietor would say tojthose who do not caro to visit the exhibitions, that tho beautiful rrfoKiVT LVki
invites everybody to call and view the largest and finest assemblage of imported thorough-bred Circus stook irf A ..;..
attention will beihown them by the attaches of th exhibition. ;" ' oreu circus stock ln America, where every
REMEMBER i . J
Do not forget that we are coming with an Avalanche of Talent. Wait for us, for(we arc eoming.
18 w3v.
DR. CROOK'S COMPOUND I
SYRUP OF POKE ROOT.
Cures all diseases
depending on a depraved cotdition
of the blood.
DR. CROOK'S COMPOUND i I
SYRUP OF POKE ROOT.
Cures Scrofula,
. Scrofulous Diseases of the Eyes,
J or Scrofula in any form.
DR. CROOK'S COMPOUND II T
SYRUP OF POKE ROOT.
Removes Pimples, Blotches,
L and beautifies the Complexion.
DR.
CROOK'S COMPOUND
SYRUP OF POKE ROOT.
. " ; Cures any Disease or
i f ; ; "Rmntion on the Skin. ;
DR. CROOK'S COMPOUND I
SYRUP OF POKE ROOT.
Cures Rheumatism and
Pains in Limbs, Bones, Ac.
DR. CROOK'S COMPOUND
SYRUP OF POAE ROOT.
Should be taken by all
....... . ; V requiring a remedy
to make pure blood.
DR. CROOK'S COMPOUND I
SYRUP OF POKE ROOT.
' Is the best Alterative
or Bloody Purifier made.
DR. CROOK'S COMPOUND t
SYRUP OFjPOKE Rt)OT.
Cures long standing
' Diseases of the Liver.
DR. CROOK'S COMPOUND, i -
SYRUP OF POKE ROOT.
Cures Scald Head,
Salt Rheum, Tetter.
DR. CROOK'S COMPOUND -i "
SYRUP OF POKE ROOT.
Removes Syphilis
or the diseases it entails
more effectually and speedily
than any and all other remedies combined.
Aug. 24. 1871. 3, WAtriwly.
-pOORS,
SASHES,
BLINDS,
j Wood Mouldings, Stair Rails, Newels, Ac, .
ENAMELLED, EMBOSSED;
! GROUND AND CUT GLASS.
A large and well assorted stock of the
above goods constantly on hand at the low
est rates, i Order work prom ptly attended to.
Builders and owners will find it to their ad
vantage to get our estimate before purchas
ing, j Special attention . given to Black
Waktot and other Fikst-Class work. 4
'" Estimates and Prioo Lists furnished on
application. .
WHITLOCK & CO.,
! 851 & 256 Civnal Street, '
JunoS, 1871.
NKW YORK.
2 wjy.
JMPORTANT BANKRUPT SALE f
xxavmg oeen appointed Assignee of the i
estate of Archibald Taylor, Bankrupt. I
will sell to tho highest bidder for cash, on '
the premises, near Portis' Gold Mine, lii
Franklin county, N. C, on Thursday, the
12th day of October, 1871, at 10 o'clock, xi ;
m., all the personal property belonging to
the said estate, towit ; . , , , i
HOUSEHOLD AND KITCHEN FURNITURE,
ALL THE FAB III NO IMPLEMENTS, , j
and a number of Horses, Mules, Cattle
Hogs, 1 Wagon, Buggy, afid other veldclcsj
and such other personal property belonging
to saia estate as Is not exemnt
ftvriaiuiiaui BCCUOn 14
A ct of March 2d, 1807. '
of the Bankrupt
IlICII'p HARRIS, Assignoo, !
. .. .. Post0fll. Oxford; N.cf:
J-tfc. Aa L I . j. '
37-w3tw
    

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