North Carolina Newspapers

    Southern Claims Commission.
Washington, D. C,
October 2, 1871.
Messrs. Editors: The following,
which I clip from The Republican of
this morning, will be interesting to a
large number of your readers who have
claims before the Commission. It will
also spare much unnecessary correspon
dence with Attorneys in this city.
Truly Yours, m. n
Judge Aldis (president) and ex-Sena-ator
liowell, (member) of the Southern
Claims Commission, have returned to
this city after an absence of three
months spent in mingled recreation and
deliberation upon the cases carried by
them to their homes for that purpose.
"R-r.'Rnrrsf ntatlve Forriss. the remain
ing member of the commission, is de
tained at trie lortn ior a iew aays lon
ger, but he, too, will shortly join his
near? ntrj !
According to the arrangements made
before their departure, me commission
ers will resume their sessions for the
examination of witnesses in those cases
where the claimants desire their testi
mony to be given personally before the
commissioners to-morrow. Assign
ments for this purpose have been made
mwrfntf nil the time that can be snar
ed from other duties to the 15th day of
The special commissioners appointed
last June in the several Southern States
to take the testimony in claims of small
amount, where the claimants are too
poor to bear the expense of bringing
their witnesses to Washington, have
been employed in this duty all summer,
and the depositions in some three hun
dred cases have been received from
them to this date. Twenty-five of these
special commissioners have thus far
been appointed, of whom about eigh
teen are kept constantly engaged by
the claimants residing in their locali
ties; some of them, in fact, being una
ble to meet all the demands for their
services. Although this number takes
and forwards now more testimony than
the commission here can, with their
own engagements, consider and dis
pose of Immediately, it is probable that,
to meet the desire of claimants to have
their evidence perpetuated while their
witnesses arc accessible, and by agents
residing at reasonable distances from
the latter, additional local commission
ers will at once be appointed in the
larger and more populous of the once
rebel States; but the-commissioners
will not depart from their first inten
tion of limiting their appointments to
the smallest number that- can reasona
bly answer the purpose of their ap
lointment. It is also probable that they will yield
so far to the apparent necessities of the
casein another direction as to enlarge
tho nnthnrltv nf thpir Rivwinl Prtmmls-
doners beyond the nominal amount of
.three tnousana dollars, tne present lim
it of the cases in which tneyare em
powered to take testimony. This can
bo the more safely done, because expe
rience has shown that even in the more
intelligent and conscientious class of
claims the amounts demanded are, in
a majority of the cases, much in excess
of any amounts which the commission
ers are likely to find themselves war
ranted in allowing in full settlement
thereof. Even where the cautious and
restrictive terms of the act of March 3,
1870, in exacting a constant, active, and
known loyalty on the part of theclaim
.ant, rather tlian an original, passive
and secret attachment to the Union,
and in requiring- proof of a positive or
intended use of t lie claimants property
for legitimate military purposes, 'in
stead of its mere loss or damage by un
authorized pillage or military occupa
tion, are known and recognized, there
is a permanent disposition on the part
of claimants to present their whole bill
against the Government and leave the
commissioners to aeciae wnat part oi it
. . . 1 A. .
tney can or win aiiow, ana wnat por
tion is-to be left to the future justice or
generosity of the Government, should
any sucn sentimenismove our ruiers iu
further concessions hereafter.
The scale of prices, too, against the
'United States is usually fixed the same
as in tne lnmteu transactions Detween
nrivifn iinrMno rlnrlnt thft Tear, and
under the exceptional state of aflairs
then existing In tne soutn ; wnne tne
commissioners, controlled by prudence
and measurably governed by precedent,
are not disposed to go further than to
assimilate thearticles taken from claim
nnt tn thiraofthe reemlar suddIv ta
bles of the army, and to settle for the
. . t a 9 mix
former at tne cost price oi tne latter,
added to the additional cost of trans-
ivnrfnt lnn
For the reasons just glven,the various
large sums named at different times
since the establishment of the com
mission, as representing the aggregate
amount of the claims presented, cannot
be taken as any near indication of the
amount to be drawn from the Treasu
ry in rendering-to loyal people in the
South the same compensation for pri
vate property taken for public uses as
loyal people in the loyal States have
been receiving, also by acts of Congress
ever since the war began. Failure to
establish the required measure and
constancy of loyalty, and to distinguish
between the necessary and proper use
of the property on the onehand,and its
loss, damage or destruction on the
other; the constant detection of fraudu
lent and false allegations as to loyalty
and pretended facts, and reduction of
over-estimated quantities and exorbi
tant prices, will so inure to the public
benefit as to relieve Secretary Boutwell
from any apprehensions concerning his
monthly debt statements and the tax
paying public from fears of a big raid
on the funds in Treasurer Spinner's
& tilts '
On the subject of additional legisla
tion concerning these claims and their
investigation. It may be assumed that
claims for the authorized and beneficial
use and occupation of . buildings and
grounds for barracks, quarters and per
manent camps and fortificationss well
as depots ana hospitals, will be express
ly included within the Jurisdiction of
the commissioners, who, somewhat
against their own conviction, and in
the face of a formidable array of au
thorities cited before them by able
counsel, have wisely, perhaps, and
prudently.ataU events excluded many
such claims from present consideration
in deference to the restrictive interpre
tation placed by. other Government
officials upon the term, stores and sup
plies, i " "
It seems not unlikely, too, that the
investigation of all 6uch claims as these
commissioners are now examining
will,wherever arising within theUnlted
States, be intrusted to them or to some
similar board. , At ' present claimants
from Kentucky, ;Maryland and West
Virginia and the other Northern States
must apply exclusively to certain bu
reaus of the -War Department ; those
from certain of the States, or portions
thereof, officially proclaimed by Presi
dent Lincoln as In rebellion.exciusively
thr rvrmmlpsloners of claims. , and
lirMA fmm TpntiPSSPfl and two of the
counties of West Virginia either, or
botn, at tneir option, ine sumwv
tt ntferr nf nil thpsA claims is identical.
viz: Certain private property taken or
lurmsnea ior army use uunug me laws
war; but the methods of reception!
record, procedure and proof, means of
investigation and payment, Ac, are all
different. It would be but an exercise
of ordinary business-like common sense
if Congress were to consolidate the bus
iness of setting these claims.
Eight thousand claims are now on
file with' the commissioners, an aver
age of over thirteen hundred claims a
month. But of the whole number two
thirds have been filled within the last
three months, and the ratio of monthly
receipts to the whole number is still in
creasing. To conduct their large office
business the commissioners are at pres
ent allowed by law one clerk and one
stenographer. They have been pre
tuTvnt fmm nhsnlute chaos in their in
ternal affairs by the-temporary loan of
. - a i rn - 1
a lew clerics irom tne xruasury uu
War Departments, who are necessary
to be withdrawn for service In their
proper offices as soon as Congress,at its
next session, snail nave an opportunity
to provide for the wants of its last crea
tion.
The Web of Character.
BY EGERT L. BANGS.
It is said that, in the erineham-mill.
a broken or a slack-twisted thread spoils
the web through the piece of a hundred
yards. When we consider what beau
tiful fabrics are the product of the loom,
nnrl hnw imnnrfont fl nart thev Dlav in
the furnishing of our houses and the
adornment of our persons, we are temp
ted to regard weaving as a high art. J
Once indeed It was a feminine ac
complishment, and it ranked higher
than the second-rate caterwauling; of
Italian-Opera by English-speaking voi
ces, or the working of blue dogs and
pink-sheep in worsted ever ought to
rank. ' 'I
It is pleasant to recall the old story
of Penelope and her web ; it was so in
timately associated with conjugal fidel
ity, a virtue .to be reverenced in these
days of cheap divorces and uncongenial
unions. She wove her web by day to
keep peace among her suitors having
nromised to eive her hand to one of
them, when the web was completed.
But at night she pulled out what jsho
had wrought by day and gained time for
her liege lord's return by making fool3
of her admirers. If we too could only
null out at nicht what we have woven
bv dav on the veb of character,! the
pulling out would often be more satis
factory than the weavincr. I
Our web, however, is a very differ
ent one from that of Penelope. She
made, fools of her suitors, and the krirl
of the period often does thesame, though
it must be confessed that her wav of
doing it is entirely unlike that; of j the
selves, and the pattern once woven is a
lasting out" . h e niay mucru impuv
e
noon it. but each dav's weavmcr is
in
fast colors, and the work
forms a fabric that will
out.
- T '
of each day
never wear
And what an endless variety" of pat
terns different persons are weaving, in
to the web of character. Could they be
made visible by some process like that
which converts the invisible tracery of
a?ids upon paper into legible characters,
we should see such pictures as no I ma
terial fabric ever had wrousrht ilnto
it.
All woven stuffs of whatever kind,
are included under the generic name of
4web' and in them all, however va
ried the fiirures that adorn them, or
the colors that lteht them up. we (find
simply a warp and a woof of fil
linsr. I
The-web of character has its warp
and its woof. Its warp begins with the
first moment of life, and extends to Its
close. Our Maker himself winds it out
to us, and determines its length,1 but
the woof Is of our own choosing. And
upon our choice the quality of the; web
depends. It Is a curious, sometimes a
painful, study to see what kind of filling
Immortal weavers are putting mtp this
complex, indestructible, ana wonder
full v varied web of character.
In Drake exquisitely beautiful po-
rm TTha fSilriif. TToir ' tlio fairer Viott
the fairy hero
at the cricket's call to
charmed armor.
arms, dons his
"Ilia cloak of a thousand minded dres
Was formed of the winga of butterflies."
Longfellow tells us that "Life is ear
nest, life is real." With all it earnest
ness and reality there is a tribe of aim
less beings who flit through it, disport-
In cr themselves in the sunshine of
wealth fluttering in the mingled dyes
of fashion serving no useful purpose
caring for nothing but to be pursued
and captured by some rich nobody: who
can give them a splendid cage,! and
worth iust about as much when caught
as the butterflies that schoolboys chase.
Such as these are weaving the web of
character after the gaudy pattern or the
butterflies' wings quite pretty toj look
at, but good for nothing. . j
And you, young man, to whom the
gilded saloon is a pleasant resort,as you
stand at the bar and gaily drink lyour
glass of wine or brandy, you are weav
ing into the web of your character, the
pattern of a bloated sot. -If you could
only see it in all its hideous horror;you
would surely stop and chance the pat
tern; for who w ould not rather shape
the threads of your life into some form
of noble manhood ' than into one of in
carnate beastiness..
Very lovely are the patterns that
some humble workers are weaving into
the web of character. You, Sunday
school teachers, who forego rest after
the morning servicet and Impart heav
enly instruction to littlo children; per
haps going out into the highways and
hedges to gather them in you are
weaving a web, the beauty of which is
and which will never be fully revealed
till all eyes are cleared of earthly mists.
And what you weave into yourj own
web, you are teaching others to weave
into theirs. j '
The stuffs that are sold in the markets
as we unroll them, are generally of un
iform quality and appearance. Could
we take the web of any finished! char
acter and follow it all the way from the
cradle to the other side of .the river,
how varied the hues of such a web
would be I How many rotten streaks
and rough places, and then again how
many bright spots ana lovely ngures
we should see even in the best or the
worst character. And so we weave on
and no man seeth the pattern, ;but In
due time he shall see It as it isho shall
know what manner of web he hath
woven. - '
Flint, Mich., Sept. 12, 1871;
0 -T - - - - -
T. D. Boardman, of Hartford, Conn.,
who discovered the process of making
Britannia ware, is. still a workman in
the same shop where he made the dis
covery, sixty-seven years ago.
San. Houston's Marriage,
. The story of Sain Houston, to the ef
fect that he discovered on the night of
his marriage that his wife loved anoth
er, and immediately left her, has been
told hundreds of times ; but it seems
there are grave doubts as to its truth
fulness. A cousin of the lady, who
signs Herself "M. B. H.," writes as fol
lows teethe Memphis Appeal:
I have seen several pieces in your
papers lately, purporting to tell' why
General Houston and wife separated
early, j J As Mrs. Houston and myself
were not only intimate friends, but
relatives, I think I can tell why they
separated so early, with as much truth
as any one else. In the Appeal, several
days ago, there was an extract from the
Galveston Bee, stating tliat they lived
together only three days. This is not
true. They lived together three months.
I am pretty certain in stating, also, that
she had another , sweetheart in the
neighborhood. It is true Eliza Hous
ton and William T. were always par
ticular friends, but neither she nor any
one else would have thought of marry
ing ai man in the last stages of consump
tion, for at the time my acquaintance
commenced with Mrs. Houston this
young, man was in Cuba, seeking to
prolong, his life; and that Mr. and
Mxs.j Allen were ambitious people and
forced her to marry General Houston,
is all; a mistake. Two more unambiti
ous people never lived. To be sure the
match was considered good, and they
told their daughter so, but there was
no force used, and no stronger persua
sion General Houston, as his wife
told toe, was a maniac on the subject
of female virtue, and did not believe a
pure! woman lived. He upbraided her
the first night he married, and every
day Afterward as long as he lived ' with
her, iacting now the fond husband and
in ten minutes a furious maniac, the
victim of ungovernable jealousy. Mrs.
Houston knew there was no happiness
in store for her, and determined to sep
arate. She lived a life of complete se
clusion for a year or two a picture of
perfect woe. She afterward professed
religion, and was at times quite cheer
ful;! but the lk of sadness never, as
long as I knew her, left her face? which
was of a sweet, gentle and winning ex
pression. She was not pretty, but dig
nified, graceful and queenly in her ap
pearance. She never uttered a . harsh
or reproachful word of the General
KiWifxl onlv to nitv him. They both
i
rnnrrifvl nftprwiird i he a woman of
deep piety, and such was her influence
over him that he, too, became a mem
ber Of the Church and died a gooa man.
;: j
A IStorr of the Assassination.
. -
rVUck Acciae?nntirn nf Prosulfillt Lin
colli is called to mind by a remarkable
STirV IUHI 1IIUUU UUUUU UV unuaiu
Withers of New York. ."Mr. With
ers,f ' we read, "has a son named Wil
liarh, who was the leader of the orches
tra at Lina Edwin's .theatre last win
tprJ ' Both father and - son were in
Ford's theatre at the time that Booth
shot Lincoln. The elder Withers was
ond iof the orchestra, and played the
troinoone. j. no younger uuu ut-ru
seated in the parquette; but just pre
vious to the time when the fatal shot
wak fired, he left his seat and proceeded
to !the back part of the stage for the
purpose of speaking to some one there
on a private matter. The Witherses
were well acquainted with Booth, and
he with themthe elder having played
a game of billiards with Booth on the
Saturday evening previous, the former
losing the game; butuoom wno wouiu
not! permit him to pay for it, exhibited
a thick roll of bills c-f large denomina
tions, and in a boasting way remarked
that he had struck oil. After Booth
had fired, and he started to retreat
thrnnfh the winsrs to the back entrance
hef was met in the passage by young
Withers, who did not know what had
taken nlace. Withers tried to speak
to fhim hut Booth made a lunsre at
him with a knife which he held in his
hand. Withers dodsred the blow, but
it. nevertheless struck him in the shoul
der in an angulardirection, and glanced
nfn ? mittinc through coat, vest and
shirt, and producing a slight wound of
the skin. He then rusnea on out ana
mrinntpd his horse. William Withers.
jr. J stated these facts to Mayor Wallack
previous to his examination, wno au
vised him not to mention the circum
stance of receiving the stab, and he
did not do so. The elder Mr. Withers
cannot imagine for what purpose that
advice was given."
Tenuis Nanoleon recently planted, in
th? park attached to his English resi-
uepce,ayoung snoot oi weeping wmow,
from Longwood, St. Helena.
THE AMERICAN WASHER!
5 PRICE, $5.50.
Th American Washer Saves Money, Tims, and
J ' Drudgery.
Th Fatigue of Washing Day no Longer
Dreaded, but Economy, Efficiency, and
plean Clothing, Sure.
; ri calling public attention to this little
machine, a few of the invaluable qualities,
(hot : possessed by any other washing ma
chine yet invented,) are here enumerated.
'It is the smallest, most compact, most
portable, most simple in construction, most
easily operated. A child ten years old, with
a few hours practice, can thoroughly com-
Drehend and effectually use it. There is no
adjusting, no screws to annoy, no delay in
adapting! It is always ready for use! It
is & perfect little wonder ! It is a miniature
ciant. doinz more work and of a better
duality, than the most elaborate and costly.
-ft- - S.I t i 11 A ...
Une naii oi ine laror is iuuy savea uy its
use, and the clothes will last one-half longer
than by the old plan of the rub board. It
will wash the largest blanket. Three shirts
at ia.time, washing thoroughly ! - In a word,
the ablution of any fabric, from a Quilt to a
Lace Curtain or Cambric Handkerchief, are
equally within the capacity of this LITTLE
GEM! It can be fastened to any tub and
taken off at will.
Xn matter how deep rooted a prejudice
may exist against Washing Machines, the
moment this little machine Is seen to per
form itst wonders, all doubts of its cleansing
elllcacy and utility are banished, and the
doubter and detractor at once, become the
fast friends of the machine. .
Wo have testimonials without end. setting
forth its numerous advantages over all oth
ers, and from hundreds who have thrown
aside the unwieldy, useless machines, which
have srienallv failed to accomplish the ob
ject promised in prominent ana loud sound
ing advertisements.
It is as perfect for washing as a wringer Is
for wringing. The price another paramount
inducement to purchasers, has been placed
so low that it is within the reach of every
housekeeper, and there is no article of do
mestic economy that will repay the small
investment so soon.
.'All that is asked for this GREAT LABOR
S AVER, is a fair trial. We guarantee each
machine to do its worK penecuy.
Holk Agents for thk united states,
A. II. FRANCISCUS & CC,
f 513 Market SL, Philad'a. Pa.
I The largest and cheapest WOODEN
WARE HOUSE In the United States, t t
; Oct. 5, 187L J&-w3m.
DR. CROOK'S WINE OF TAR i
Is the very remedy for the Weak
" and Debilitated.
DR. CROOK'S WINE OF TAR 1
u Rapidly restores exhausted
'3r - strength. . :
DR. CROOK'S WINE OF TAR j
Restores the Appetite and
' Strengthens the Stomach.
DR. CROOK'S WINE OF TAR !
Causes the food to digest, removing
Dyspepsia and Indigestion.
; . . ,
DR. CROOK'S WINE OF TAR J
' Gives tone and energy to
Debilitated Constitutions.
DR. CROOK'S WINE OF TAR
. Is an effective
regulator of the Liver.
DR. CROOK'S WINE OF TAR )
. : Cures Jaundice,
or any Liver Complaint.
DR. CROOK'S WINE OF TAR
Makes Delicate Females,
h who are never feeling well,
; Strong and Healthy.
DR. CROOK'S WINE OF TAR j
-Has restored many persons
who have been
unable to work foryears.
DR. CROOK'S WINE OF TAR
Should be taken if your Stomach
is out of order, j .
DR. CROOK'S WINE OF TAR !
Should be taken if you feel
weak or debilitated. '
DR. CROOK'S WINE OF TAR
Should bo taken to strengthen and ,
build up your system.
DR. CROOK'S WINE OF TAR
Will cure your Dyspepsia or
Indigestion.
DR. CROOK'S WINE OF TAR I
Will prevent Malarious Fevers,
and braces up the Systom.
: - . 1
DR. CROOK'S WINE OF TAR
Possesses Vegetable Ingredients
which makes it the
best Tonic in the market.
DR. CROOK'S WINE OF TAR
Has proved itself
in thousands of eases
capable of curing all diseases of the
Throat and Lungs.
i
DR. CROOK'S WINE OF TAR I
Cures all Chronic Coughs,
and Coughs and Colds,
more effectually than any
- other reiiKxly.
DR. CROOK'S WINE OF TAR j
Has cured cases of Consumption
pronounced incnrablo
k by physicians.
DR. CROOK'S WINE OF TAR I
Has cured so many leases of
Asthma and IJrbnchitis
that it has been pronounced a specific
i for these complaints."
DR. CROOK'S WINE OF TAR
Removes pain in Dreast, Side or Back.
DR. CROOK'S WINE OF TAR j 5
Should be taken fur
diseases! of the
Urinary Organs.
DR. CROOK'S WINE OF TAR
' Cures Gravel and Kidney Disease.
DR. CROOK'S WINE OF TAR j
Should be taken for all
Throat and Lung-Ailment.
DR. CROOK'S WINE OF TAR
1 Renovates and
Invigorates the entire system.
DR. CROOK'S WINE OF TAR
Should bo kept in every house,
and its lile-giving
Tonic properties tried by ah.
DR. CROOK'S WINE OF TAR
All recovering from any illness
wilt una mis ixie ,
best Tonic they can take.
PURIFY YOUR BLOOD.
DR. CROOK'S
Compound Syrup of
POKE HOOT!
DR. CROOK'S COMPOUND i
' SYRUP OF POKE ROOT.
Is the active medicinal
quality of Poke Root
combined with the
best preparation of Iron,
DR. CROOK'S. COMPOUND !
SYRUP OF POKE ROOT.
Builds up Constitutions
broken down from
Mineral or Mercurial Poisons.
DR. CROOK'S COMPOUND ! r
SYRUP OF POKE ROOT.
' Cures all diseases
depending on a depraved cot dition
of the blood.
DR. CROOK'S COMPOUND r
SYRUP OF POKE ROOT.
Cures Scrofula, .
Scrofulous Diseases of the Eyes,
or Scrofula in any form.
DR. CROOK'S COMPOUND r I
SYRUP OF POKE ROOT.
Removes Pimples, Blotches,
and beautifies the Complexion.
DR CROOK'S COMPOUND H - ;
SYRUP OF POKE ROOT.
Cures any! Disease or
Eruption on the Skin.
DR. CROOK'S COMPOUND j
SYRUP OF POAE ROOT.
Should be taken by all
requiring a remedy
- to make pure blood.
DR. CROOK'S COMPOUND !
Z i SYRUP OF POKE ROOT.
Cures old Sores, Boils or Ulcers.
DR. CROOK'S COMPOUND I
SYRUP OF POKE ROOT.
Is the best Alterative
or Blood Purifier made.
DR. CROOK'S COMPOUND !
SYRUP OF POKE ROOT.
Cures long standing
. t Diseases of the Liver.
DR. CROOK'S COMPOUND I
SYRUP OF POKE ROOT.
Cures Rheumatism and
: Pains in Limbs, Bones, Ac.
DR. CROOK'S COMPOUND I
SYRUP OF POKE ROOT.
1 Cures Scald Head,
... . gait Rheum, Tetter.
DR. CROOK'S COMPOUND I - - r
SYRUP OF POKE ROOT.
" Removes Syphilis
i or the diseases it entails
' more efTectuallv and sneedilT
than any and all other remedies combined.
Aug. 24, , ... so :Winwij. ..
r ;- a L. HARRIS, ' f " r'?5: 'w
P . Attobney At Law,
(Office first door South of Standard building,)
V'." :rr Xaleigh, IT. CL : " .
PmMJB In the Conrts of Wake and before
U S. Commissioner, and gives special at
tention to the araruine of causes in the
Supreme Court of North Carolina. All
business entrusted to him, -will receive
nromnt attention. . I , o tr.
f - - at - j : t
Wat !
, . . THE ONLY
MENAGERIE, CARAVAK, MUSEUM AND
' THAT WILL
f - c '
-V yMr. ' I
l O LD J O B i.S-iii i .': ;v t
Sixty-seven vcars of a"-e, with an ' experience of over Fii'tv Years in the South as owner of a , Menagerie and Circus, on his grand
" , I - 4 - . - i : ..'!..:...' ' ' i I ;
ANNUAL TRIUMPHAL TOUR ; , ' ' . ,jj : ,
Through all the Southern States with THREE MONSTER PAVILIONS: One exclusively for the Museum; Another express
ly for the Menagerie anl Caravan ; the third devoted to the Equestrian Entertainments, all adjoining and connecting together, but
. 1 ONLY ONE PRICE OF ADMISSION .
, j And One Ticket admits you io the entire combination, Menagerie, Caravan, Museum and Circus.
WAIT FOR IT!
The onlv real Menagerie, Museum, Caravan and first-class Circus on the road. " '
: 25 GOLD AND CRIMSON CACES, drawn by beautiful matched Cream and Dappled
ana aesx, i-araae ii.ver een on ino iruoiic otreets. . -
FOUR MONSTER
AVith
their yonncf PLATYRHYNCHUS
over Two uundrea Jf ounas i iiesn i!
? . At. ? ... "
A !
From the Desorta of Tartary, with long,'beautiful hair' gr'owinsr from his back to the ground.'
t , ... America. Don't confound this with any Small Show or
Menagerie,
r7Ti
tion which
The Challange
N. B. TO LOWERS OF FINE HORSES.
collection of thorough-bred imported Horses
AAA AA J LI UIUCU Ut9ACU, WAtAAWJA, LUV UlU
this monster show, and the proprietor
which are attached to the great Three '.
invites everybody to call and view the largest
attention will be shown them by tne attaches
! I : 1 ; I REMEMBER THE DAY AND THE DATE.
; . : . ' v
Do not loi-get that we are coming with an Avalanche of Talent.. Wait for us, for wp arceoming.'1
JOORS, J
SASHES,
BLINDS,:
-t;i"; t t,tj
Wood Mouldings, Stair Rails, Newels,. die,.
fGROUND'lANDiT GpAS.y:',
A large and well assorted stock of the
above goods constantly on hand at the low
est rates. Order work promptly attended to.
Builders and owners will find it to their ad'
vantage to get our estimate before purchas
ing : i special i attention given to btjlck
Wautut and other First-Class work. :
Estimates and Price Lists furnished on
application . 1 . , u
iWHITLOCIC & CO., ,
i',"- v 854 & SCO Canal Stireet, . 'n
KEff TOBE.
June 8, 1871.
Wat ! ! for the. Big : Show
VISIT THE SOUTHERN STATES THIS win xv.
THE ONLY AND ORIGINAL ,
WATCH FOR IT,!
LIVING-SEA
LEONENUS, or SEA ELEPHANTS, "with
isn aauy ior tneir suDsistence ine omy ones on
seen in this Menagerie at all hours, sporting in an artificial Lake
1 A .11 1 A-1 Z - a-1 xi -.2 1 T1
Wild Tartarian; Monster v, Yak-;'
but bear in mind that . ; " -J
TnTTTT. T5 rT3TAr QnTT Vi n Tnai I
' Is triumphantly marching on: and will positively exhibit'
.at. : ; ;;. .. -' ; ; '
fRALEIGH,-SATURDAYy; OCT; 21; 1871. :
, Don't confound thli gigantic organization with auy other
show bearing the name.of Robinsont for it is' in no way,
shape, or manner connected with smy or either of them, but
Jt is the ONLY ORIGINAL OLD JOHN ROBINSON,
"who has owned and managed shows for the . past fifty years,
through the Southern country, and has spent years of toil
and vast sums of money to bring his monster Museum, .
Menagerie, Caravan and Circus to the high state of perfec-
it now assumes,
Champion
Show of
The particular attention of stock' raisers
and Ponies, from almost every clime under
and :
would say to those who do not care to visit the exhibitions, that the beautiful portable stables f
rent Show are open at all times for public inspection. FREE OF CHAltflK ami hn .r.Uaiiv
id finest assemblage of imported thorough-bred
the exhibition." . j. ...
t . Ll - Z .1 l- i j . - . ' m.m.j ,
or 1
"TTTILTBERGER'S FLAVORING ' EX
j Y V'- TRACTS, are warranted equal to any
niade. They are- prepared from the fruits,
and will be found much better than many
of the Extracts that are sold. , tl - , K
! jzir Ask your Grocer or Druggist for
Wiltberger's Extracts. : . . . ,. -; v . i ;
h : , BARLOW'S INDIGO BLUE T-
Is f without ' doubt, the best article in ; the
market, ioi blueing clothes. It will color
more water than four times thesame weight
of indigo? and ,much . jnore' than any other
i wash blue In the market. The only genuine
isthat put up at-'4 ! ; "'-v
ALFRED 'WILTBERGER'S DRUG STORE,
Ko. 233 Korih Second SL- Philadelphia; Fa:
i The Labels have both 'Wiltberger's and
Barlow's name on them;t all 'Others are
counterfeit. a For sale by most Grocers and
Druggists. ' , v ! aug. 1( 4mw4triw,
H - '- - - ', .- ' , ' .
I - ' BAND LEADERS.
For something Interesting, send vour ad
dress to GEORGE W. GATES, Frankfort,!
N. Y. ' .. ;.:
1 1 !
"' "1
: .... ;.. . - . ....
) GO AND SEE IT!-
1 ' M : ' V r ; : I
Horses all the Circus Retinue i-Lnrest '
LIONS !
mane erectf like Forest Monarcbs, onuirin"
exnibition in the World, and cai bo
m -k a . M
of Ocean Water.
The only one on cxhibiliftn hi
the World.
and everv one else la callrvl iui urjimAtA
the sun. The beautiful Arabian 'the mifl- V
Circus stock in America: where overy '
- . - ... . . t f t
18 w3w.
MANHOOD '' : : .
How Lost! How Restored!
Jast Published, in Sealed Envelope.? Price6ct.
. A Lecture on the Natural Treatment, and .
Radical Cure of Spermatorrhea or Seminal 5
IJf.ness, involuntary Emissions, Sexual
A Boon to Thousands of Sufferers." . 1
Sent under seal, in' a plain envelope, to
any address, postpaid. tn receiDt of x ot
or two postage stamps, by CUA8. J. C
KLINE A CO., 127, wcry, New' York;
Aug. 19, 1871.. . . ,; ' 33 trlwAw2m;
VTICE LOT OF MULES FOR SALE !
Seven' mules for sale on hibdorjilo terms :
Call and see them, . -
V i ' I4 V, ' w WYNNE fc CO.
Raleiglt, Sept. J2, 1871. . !: ; s 4: tf. .
xj3uu.i,yf iuiu ampeaiments - to Marriage
generally; .Nervousness, Consumption,
Epilepsy, and Fits; Mental and Physical,
Incapacity, resulting from Self Abuse, Ac., .
by Robert J. Culverwell, M. D.; author of
the" Green Book ' Ac. "'i . : - i
M
    

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