North Carolina Newspapers

    ttfiwl
No, 118
NEW BERN. N. C, TUESDAY, MAY 20, 1913-FIRST SECTION
35th YEAR
Weekly
I0
r;
...
I
Br ''jjv -
n
ll
i
I
H
GRAVEN CITIZEN
AWARDED DAMAGES
Thirteen Hundred And Twenty
Five Dollars Amount He
Will Receive.
HIS TIMBER WAS DESTROYED
One
Of The Norfolk Southern
Locomotives Caused
The Fire.
Thirteen hundred and twenty-five
dollars was the amount which the jury
yesterday awarded to R. H. Rowe, a
Craven county man who was suing the
Norfolk Southern Railway Company for
five thousand dollars for damage done
to timber owned by him when it was set
. afire by one of the defendant company's
locomotives.
The- plaintiff, who lives about three
miles from Bridgeton claimed that more
than one hundred acres of valuable Um
ber land was destroyed and that this
was Worth at least five thousand dollar,
The jury thought that this amount was
entirely too high and in rendering their
verdict were governed accordingly.
The next case taken up was that of
Edward Coward vs. W. E. Proctor,
This was an action for breach of con
tract and the plaintiff was suing for
damages m the sum of five hundred and
eighty dollars. The two men had been
engaged in the poultry business and the
plaintiff claimed that his partner had
not treated him fairly in his transactions.
A number of witnesses were examined
in this case and the arguments on both
sides were rather lengthy but the case
was given to the jury yesterday after
noon and after deliberating for more
than an hour they returned a verdict in
favor of the plaintiff.
In the case of Hartley vs. Norfolk
Southern which was next taken up, the
plaintiff is suing for damages for timber
which he claims was destroyed by one
of the defendant company's engines. It
was late in the afternoon when this case
was reached and at the close of the day's
session it was continued until today.
TomorroW is the last day of a two
weeks' term of Craven county Superior
Court for the trial of civil cases. The
docket has been pretty well cleared of
the cases set for trial at this term of
court and much of the time on the last
day wilf be taken up with the disposal
of the motion docket.
CHARTER LOCAL ENTERPRISE.
Neuse Realty And Brick Company
Was Incorporated Friday.
The Neuse Realty and' Brick Com
pany is the latest addition to New
Bern list of business enterprises, the
new concern being granted a charter
last Friday afternoon.
The incoprorators of this new enter
prise is D. E. Hendreson and others.
Mr. Henderson is one of the most
prominent attorneys in the city and
enjoys an enviable reputation both
for integrity and business ability. He
is connected with a number of enter
prises in this and adjoining counties.
The new concern has an authorized
capital of $50,000 and $1,500 of this
has been paid in.
THE RINGLEADER
T
BEHIND
HE BARS
HEAD OF STOREBREAKING
GANG LANGUISHES IN
THE KINSTON JAIL.
HUNDREDS ATTEND
BIG LAND SALE
Seventy-Five Lot Located At Pol-
lokavllle Were Sold
Yesterday.
IN THE BUSINESS SECTION
Big Barbecue Dinner Was Greatly
Enjoyed By All
Present.
FREIGHT WRECK
DELA1TRAFFIC
PASSENGERS TRANSFERRED
FOREMAN'S CAR PRESSED
INTO SERVICE.
Passengers on the Norfolk Southern's
Beaufort . train last night had to be
transferred at a point between Have
lock and Newport, the track being
blocked by a freight wreck. There was
5 no regular equipment East of the wreck
but a combination coach used by the
bridge foreman and his crew was pressed
into service and the passengers and mail
were carried to their destinations in it.
The freight train wrecked was the one
leaving here in the afternoon for Beau
fort. Two box cars and a coal car got
off the track. No one was injured.
Wrecking crews went to work promptly
to dear the track.
With the arrest yesterday at Kinston
of Henderson Williams, colored, the
leader of one of the worst gangs of store-
breakers which ever "worked eastern
North Carolina ,is behind the bars. Also
in the same jail is Herbert Foy and
Claud Meldrum, two members of Wil
liams' clan and it is hoped that the ag
gration is broken up.
Williams and about a dozen confed
erates have operated all over this sec
tion since last November but during the
past two months the railway detectives
have been on their trail and life with
them has not been "one grand sweet
song."
Among the robberies attributed to
this gang is that of B. W. Cannady's
store at Kinston, W. P. Metts' store
and A. Castet's store in this city and
several other robberies.
Henderson Williams, 22 years old,
is a genius of his kind. He is a native
of Onslow county, and has served time
on the roads there. A small man of
gingercake color and unassuming man
ner, he has led a daredevil outfit of ac
complished thieves who harassed city
storekeepers and country merchants
alike in a dozen counties. Thousands
of dollars fell to them in plunder.
W. W. Morrison and J. L. Pettus,
Norfolk Southern's special agents, traced
the gang's work over the Knes of the nere
Atlantic Coast Line from New Hern to
Wilmington and from Goldsboro to
Wilmington and over the Norfolk
Southern from Kinston to New Bern.
Stolen merchandise in great quantities,
ncluding firearms, clothing, jewelry
and whiskey, was disposed of by 'the
robbers in the logwoods of Craven,
Lenoir, Onslow, and other counties. In
January, Williams and his men entered
a clothing sure and a hardware store in
Mt. CI ve, a hardware store at Mays-
villr, and a hardware and another store
in Jacksonville. Two nights .after the
haul in Jacksonville a hardware store
in Wilmington was entered. In Febru
ary bt siness was good with them, and
in March they turned to work on a
larger scale. In that month the Norfolk
Southern stations at Caswell and Dover
were entered, and large quantities of
whiskey stolen.
The police in this city and also at
Kinston and the railway detectives
have the names of several others who
were connected with this gang of rob
bers and other arrests are expected to
follow within a few days.
More than four hundred people from
all over the surrounding section yester
day attended the big sale of residence
and building lots at Polloksville. The
sale was conducted by the American
Realty and Auction Company of Greens
boro and the auctioneering was done by
the Famous Penny Brothers, the men
who sell a-lot-a-minutc. Seventy-five
lots were sold at an average of two hun
dred dollars a lot.
This property is located in the busin
ness section of Polloksvilic and was
owned by C. E. Foy of this city. When
Mr. Foy first decided to dispose of this
property and placed the contract to
dispose of it in the hands of the Amer
ican Realty Company of Greensboro
this company at once made a contract
for a large amount of space in the New
Bern-Semi-Weekly Journal, the paper
which is doubtless read by more rural
residents in this and surrounding coun
ties than any other publication in cast
ern North Carolina. The crowd yester
day showed conclusively that this ad
vertising paid, tor there were more
people in Polloksville than have gath
ered there in many a day.
After the sale had been concluded
every one present was invited to par
ticipate in a big barbecue dinner which
had been prepared for the occasion
This dinner will long be remembered by
those who partook of the barbecue and
accessories. Polloksville is fast growing
and in the opinion of men who are fa
miliar with conditions it will be only a
few years before the property sold yes
terday will have increased in value to
a great extent.
POLICE GIVE DP
SEARCH FOR GIR
L
BELIEVE THAT LILLIE HARRELL
HAS DEPARTED FROM
THE CITY.
TURLINGTON TO
F
IS
ARM
After having made a thorough search,
the local police have abandoned the
hunt for Lillic Harrell, the sixteen-year-old
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. H.
Harrell of Beaufort who disappeared
from her home last Sunday afternoon
and was later seen in New Bern.
The police believe that the young
woman has left the city. It is reported
that the Georgia physician, whom it
is believed she was attempting to reach,
Head Of Farm Life School Will
Make Tour Of Farm
Homes In Craven.
WILL SEE BOYS AND GIRLS
Wants To Get In Touch With
Those Who Will Attend
Farm Life School.
Dr. J. E. Turlington, principal of the
Craven County Farm Life School, has
furnished the Journal with a statement
has been seen here during the past few 0f gome 0f the facts that he wants
days and it is thought that he and the Journal readers, particularly those liv
girl have left New Bern. jn tne country, to know. He proposes
Every train has been watched since to start soon on a tour of the farms of
Sunday afternoon and as the police I the county. He docs not expect to go
h; vi a very accurate description of the
young woman, they do not believe she
left by this route but think she went
to some nearby town and boarded
the train there.
EPISCOPALIANS AT GOLDSBORO
Diocesan Council Convenes In That
City This Morning.
The Diocesan Council of the F.pis
copal churches in this district will begin
today at-Goldsboro and will continue
until Tuesday. The council will be
held in St. Stephen's church and dele
gates from all over the eastern Caro
lina Diocese will be present. Among
those who are attending from this city
Rev. B. F. Huske, Mr. and -Mrs!
George H. Roberts, Mrs. H. M. Bonner,
Mrs. Henry R. Bryan, and William
Dunn, Jr. They left last evening and
several other members of the local
church are expected to leave here today.
A large number of delegates passed
through New Bern yesterday after
noon from points all over this section.
CAPT. N. I JONES
LOSES HIS SUIT
Vancebcro Steamboat Company
Gets Verdict Against Him
For $1,200 Dollars
WAS ON A SURETY BOND
Agreed
In
To Keep River
Repair And
From All Liens.
Steamer
Free
FAMOUS OLD SHIP
MAY BE TARGET
DELEGATES RETURN
TOT
R
HOMES
Participants In Methodist
ference At Morehead City
Conclude Work.
NEXT MEETING AT GRIFTON
T.
DIED AT TALLAHASSEE.
News has reached here of the death
of George Grccnhow at Tallahassee,
Fla., on Tuesday, May 12, of heart
trouble. The funeral and burial of the
deceased took place at Tallahassee.
The widow of the deceased has relatives
C. Etherldge Of This City
Was Elected As Lay
Leader Of This District.
CANNOT RETIRE
m
RANK
YOUNG NAVAL OFFICERS IMS
CUSSING ANNOUNCEMENT
WITH EMOTION..
INJURED MAN ONE OF THE OWN
ERS OF CARTERET LODGE.
f T. J. Wilker, the official of the Amer-
l' P , i - t :..
lean iooicco u mpany wiiu whs in
jured in an automobile accident in
Richmond early this week and whose
companion, A. B. Willfnghsm, was killed
is well know to people familiar with
the hunters who go to Carteret Lodge
every winter. Mr. Walker is one of
the owners of the lodge. He is la St.
Luke's hospital in Richmond in a serious
condition, being at last accounts still
unconscious. He and his chauffeur
Lee Bell, were held responsible for the
death of Mr. Willinghamby the rorotv
er'i jury, which .however, was divided
one juror maintaining that the auto
mobile was not being driven at a high
rate of speed and that the accident
resulted from a bad tire.
Washington, May 17. Young officers
in the navy arc discussing with mixed
emotions t he announcement by Sec
retary Daniels that hereafter the dc
part menu would trown upon the re
tirement of juniors from the service
In the past young officers retiring
would have done so with a rank higher
than the grade they occupied. This
to be stopped. The statement
The Conference of the New Bern
District Methodist church which has
been in progress at Morehead Ci'.y since
Wednesday morning, practically came
to a close yesterday and the majority
of the visiting delegates returned to
their homes yesterday afternoon.
The conference was one of the most
successful ever held in the district. The
attendance was very gratifying and
much enthusiasm was manifested. The
people of Morehead City excelled them-
elves in entertaining the visitors and
nothing but words of praise of their
hospitality were heard.
One of the main features of the con
ference were the early morning sermons
delivered each morning at 6:30 o'clock
by Rev. A. D. Wilcox of Louisburg.
Rev. Mr. Wilcox is a speaker of rare
ability and his discourses were both in
structive and interesting.
The greater portion of yesterday's
session was taken up with the election
of officers and other, business. G. V.
Richardson of Dover, A. G. Coward of
Grifton, C. S. Wallace of Morehead
City and E. A. Stephenson of Goldsboro
were elected as delegates to the annual
CROPS NEED RAIN
The dry weather-is making the farm
ers feel somewhat discouraged. One
was heard to say yesterday that if a
good rain did not come soon, the Irish
potato crop would be badly cut off.
Cotton and corn also are badly in need
of rain.
NY PROVE FATAL
to them all but he expects to visit many
of them and to get in as close touch as
possible with the farmers with the view
of getting the school before them and
also of getting in first-hand touch with
the practical problems which the farm
ing fraternity in Craven has to solve.
Dr. Turlington's statement, to which
the attention of the farmer readers of
the louranal is especially directed,
follows:
"I am planning to visit as many farm
homes as possible during this summer
with a two-fold purpose. First: In the
interest of the school attempting to lo-
Con- cate and know the boys and girls who
should be in our school during the sum
ming years. Second: In order that I
may visit the farmers at their homes
and in the fields where I can study the
different soil conditions, methods of
cultivation, fertilization, crops planted,
stock raised, etc.
"I wish the farmers to treat me as a
fellow farmer and we will question each
other about the farm and farm work. 1
shall, no doubt, answer irftny of your
questions by saying 'I don't know,'
for the things that I'donot know about
farming arc much more numerous than
the things that I do know. Farming
includes the study of all the laws of
Nature which are the laws of God. It
includes the sti dy of the soil, soil life,
soil water, soil air, soil heal, plants
food in the soil and the effect of these on
the various kinds of plant hie. 1 h
study of insects, diseases of plants and
animals are also included in larming as
well as the uses and abuses of fertilizers,
feeds and feeding, and many more prob
lems too numerous to mention.
"Perhaps as we talk over some of
these problems I may aid you with some
siiiroesiions. and 1 am sure that I can
o o
learn a ereat deal from you. 1 have usc
the wooden plough and plowed with the
ox, but with much more pleasure, I
have used the sulky plough and riding
cultivators. I am learning many new
things about farming every year ro n
both practical farn ers and men who
spend their time in the laboratories.
My policy and advice to all farmers is
to sec what the most progressive farm
ers are doing and pattern after them as
much as possible. It is the methods of
these successful farmers and their wives
that we shall try to teach the boys and
girls who attend the Farm Life Scho 1.
THE OREGON TO BE FIRED ON
BY OTHER SHIPS UNLESS
PROTEST PREVAILS
conference to be held at Oxford.
T .C.Etheridge of this city was elect- thc rcasons why
I I ..I (In, , hi I i li t I ' ...
they arc successful as well as the reason
ed Lay Leader of this district.
The next conference of the New Bern
District will be held at Grifton.
Thc conference will come to a close
Sunday morning and the few delegates
who have remained over until that lime
will return home that afternoon.
LOCAL
When Will New Bern People Learn
the Importance of It?
Backache is only a simple thing at
first.
But if you find 'tis from the kid
neys; That serious kidnev troubles mv
f low;
That dropsy or Blight's disease may
be the fatal end,
You will be glad to know the fol
lowing experience.
lu the honest statement of a resi
dent of this locality.
1 C A .. 1, ; .. I -:.. t.
MR. HEWITT ALSO GRADUATES, says. "While in the armv I rrcivJ
a severe strain ana alter tnat I was
subject to attacks ol kidney trouble.
My back ached a great deal and as
time passed, the trouble grew worse.
I tried many remedies" .t seemed un
able to obtain relief and finally hearing
of Doan's Kidney Pills, I obtained t
box. They gave me great benefit.
They not Only removed thc pain in
back but strengthened mv ki,lnv.
and improved my health,"
For sale by all dealers. Price 50
cents. Foster-Milburn Co., Buffalo.
New York, sole agents for the United
that caused the flurry is as follows
While the Secretary of the Navy
has not issued any general orders re
striding the applications for volun
tary retirement under the Personnel
act of 1899, yet it is well understood
that his attitude and thc probable
attitude ol tne Administration 19
opposition to allowing the retirement
of the younger officers who are in health
and have a number of years of uscfu
service on thc dctivc list before them.
Secretary Daniels, it is well known,
looks with extreme disfavor on the re
tiremsnt of young officers before they
have made through service some returns
for the education and training received
at the hands of the Government.
Under the new "plucking" system,
by which senior officers will be retired
much more rapidly than in thc past,
the junior officers will have less com
plaint on account of slowness of promotion.
MERCHANTS CHANGE
CLOSING HOUR.
why some of the other methods are not
. t . , , c. r
so successful, unc oi tne ucncius oi an
education is to reduce the number of
mistakes made, and prevent, as far as
possible, thc making of the same mU
takes over and over again.
"To thc farmers of Craven county
my services belong and when any oc
casion arrives where I can be of some
service to you, do not hesitate to call on
The merchants of th's city lave mc. You can reach me by mail or
signed an agreement to close thcit I nhone at Vanceboro, N. C.
stores every night in thc week with 'Undoubtedly I cannot visit all the
the exception of Saturday night and farms n thc county this year, but 1 shall
the night on which thc employes of scc many of them.
Roper's mill and the Norfolk Southern ' Letters and questions regarding any
shops receive their wages. This change phase of farming or the school will be
which goes into effect on June 1, was gladly received and answered,
brought about by thc Retail Extension "We expect the school to open in
Committee of the Chamber of Commcrc I September and as soon as all thc teach-
Washington, D, C, May 17. Unless
protest saves it, the battleship Oregon
is probably doomed to be sunk by the
guns of sister ships in the United States
navy. Need of practice against heavily-armored
craft inevitably will cause '
the Oregon, Indiana, and Massachu
setts, a few years ago the best of their
kind in the world, to be made thc lar-
gets for the great gans of battleships
which have hopelessly surpassed tne -
ships in sea power.
rhe navy creed is that the best target
for guns of dreadnoughts is a llnck-
mored warship is what is looming up
is a danger signal for the vessel which
, ,. . ... . ...i
raced around I ape -norn to take pjn
the sea fight off Santiago. The as
sociations and sentiments connec tea
with the Oregon may save it, but the
gun captains of the navy say unani-
ously that the Oregon, like I he Indi-i
ana and Massacnusc.is, ougm to
sacrificed to thc benefit of the modem.
navy, of which these ships are nol now
i proper part.
The Oregon, Indiaia, and Massa-
schuctts are ill the same class. 1 tic
first that wil be cho.-cti as a target
seems likely to lc the Indiana. This
ship cost the government close to So,
000,000 to build and e llip. Naval ex
perts agree that the shooting up "I
the battleship Texas, which was used
several times f.s a target, yielded im
portant knowledge that cv.i'd have
been obtained in no other way.
The Indiana was a fi:st In c ship in
Samson's fleet at Santiago. II -r first
appearance in New Vork in lS'lo was a
condition. Her turrets and arnioi
amazed visitors who crowded the navy
yard to get a glimpse of the naval w pi -der.
She had four ihirleeii-inrh and
eight eight-inch guns. She was con
sidered a lloaling fortress.
None of the battleships it is proposed
to use as a target for the gun- of
dreadnoughts like the New York.
Texas, Wyoming, Arkansas, Florida,
and Michigan probalby will be per
... ... i I, . -.1 ....... i
mttted IO go to men uumuaiumi.
with the names made famous in 1S9S
Like ihe old Texas, they prohabh
have titles by which they never w
be recognized.
The most interesting case disposed of
at yesterday's session of Craven county
Superior Court was that of Jones vs.
1 1 1 eVa iceboro Steamboat Company. In
tl is c-c the plaintiff, Capt. N. W. Jones
of this city, who was represented by A.
D. W ard, was asking to be relieved of
a surety bond ol SiOllll which he was on
to keep the river steamer Carolina in
repair and free from liens.
The defendant company, which is
composed of J. B. Harvey, Mac Rae
Dinkins and I). R. Warren of Vancc
boro who were represented by R. A.
Nunn, O. 1-. Ward and Moore and Dunn
pul in a counter claim and asked that
a verdict compelling Captain Jones to
make good this surety of $2,0,0 be ren
dered. The case was long drawn out, a num
ber of witnesses being placed on the
stand and the attorneys taking up con
siderable time with their arguments.
The ease was given to the jury late yes
te day afternoon and after being out
a short time they returned a verdict in
favor of the .defendants but cut the a
mounl down from $2,000 to $1,200.
In thc case of Hartley vs. the Nor
folk Southern Railway Company, in
which the plaint ilf was suing for dam
ages in the sum of $600 which he claimed
was done to his timber when it was set
a lire by one ol the defendant company's
locomotives, the jury returned a verdict
in favor of tin- plaintiff but decided that
the property damaged was not worth
S600 and accordingly cut the amount
J down to S225.
Today is the last of a two wicks' ses
sion of Craven c unity Superior Court
and the grcalir pir; of the session w II
(lie taken up with I lie disposal of tie
, mot ion docket .
MONUMlN
T TO
BE
UNVEILED
ii
uid
CARDUI WORKED
LIKE J, CHARM
After Operation Failed to Help,
Cardui Worked Like a Charm.
of which CharlcB Coplon is Chairman.
When misfortune overtakes a
tier it has to go some.
Ii li ¬
ning the New Bern grad
A, ft M. College this year
e in yesterday morning's
name of Thomas Jasper
unintentionally omitted,
graduates in civil ehgin
it a son of Assistant Pust-
nus D. Hewitt. During
ir he was honored by being
INJURED CHILD IMPROVING
Little Miss Cutler's Injuries Were
Not Serious.
The condition of little Miss Sarah
Elizabeth Cutler, the eight-year-old
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Cutler,
Jr.,, who was knocked down and run
over by a motorcycle driven by Will
Deppe late Friday afternoon, was very
much improved yesterday and the
attending physician states that she
will probably be out again within a
few days.
The little girl's worst injury was. to
her left arm which was fractured. This
ut outside
WHY USE L. & M. SEMI-MIXED
REAL PINT
Because it's economical. Because it
is pure White Lead, Zinc and Linseed
Oil. Because it's the highest grade
quality paint that can be made. Be
cause when the user adds 3 quarts
of Oil to each gallon oi the L. ft M
Semi-Mixed Real Puiut, it makes
i ...;u .1,
ers nave dccii sccureu, e
an outline of the work that we propose
to do. Suffice it to say at present, that
instead of Latin and Greek we will have
tannine and home-making but English
and mathematics will receive as much
attention as in other high schools. His
tory, Physics, Chemistry, Botany, Phys
ical Geography and Physiology will also
be taught."
The head of thc Farm Life School an
nounces in today's Journal that lie is
going out among thc farmers and get in
touch with the boys and girls who arc to
1-34 eallons of pure paint at a coat of be the ttudents at thc sc i ol jv r wi ose
about $1.40 per gallon. This saves destinies he is to rr side
thc user about 60 cents a gallon on
all paint used. The L, & M is and
has always been the highest grade
snd most p;r(ect paint produced.
Sold by Gaskille Hardware Co.
Adv.
No. Six-Sixty-Six
We are sire thc f.-j-mcis will give him
a warm welcome. They will likew'se
appreciate the willirgners of l r. Tur
lington to admit that he can leara iomc
thing from the fasmers as well as pos
sibly tell them something that they
don't know.
He i roposcs to be thc messenger be
tween thc successful farmers and those
who have ni t succeeded so well and to
Jonesville, S. C "I suffered with
tw trnnhlfl." writes Mrs. J. S.
Kendrlck. In a letter from this place
"and at times, I could not bear to stand
on my feet The doctor said I would
never be any better, and that I would
have to have an operation, or I would
nave a cancer.
I went to the hospital, and they oper
ated on me. but I got no better. They
aid medicines would do me no good,
and I thought I would have to die
At last I tried Cardui, and began to
Improve, so I continued using It. Now
I am well, and can do my own work
I don't feel any pains.
Cardui worked like a charm.'
There must bs merit In this purely
vegetable, tonlo remedy, for women
Cardui for It has been In successful
nse tor more than 60 years, tor the
treatment of womanly weakness and
disease.
Please try it, tor your troubles.
N B.-vPrifa ro.' US.' ASylrr Dm. "
m T'nn" MM la
Tuesday, May 20, being thc ann:
versary of thc Mccklenfcurg Declara
tion of Independence and a legal hol
day, thc four banks of the city will be
cliscd.
Brldcton Woodmen Of Thc Wor'd
To Honor Memjry Of
Departed Brother.
BARBECUE DINNER A FEATURE
Expected That Many Visitors
Will Assist In The
Ceremonies.
Today will be a momentous occasion
o the Bridgeton Camp Woodmen of
he World, the occasion being the un
filing of a monument to the memory
f Francis A. Barnctt, a member of
hat Camp who was drowned near
Washington about two years ago, the
onument being erected over the grave
of the deceased in Cedar Grove ceme
tery, this city.
The first event on thc dav's program
II be a vi.it by thc Br'djeton dele
gates to this city early this mornini
r the purpose of meeting and wcl-
onnng the many delegates wno arc
xpected to come from Morehead City,
O iental. Cove City and other towns
n this section. After these have ar
rived they will be joined by a number
f the members of Elmwood Camp
Woodmen of thc World of this city
and will go over to BridgHon.
At noon a big ba b uc dinner will
be served thc visitors. Nine, fat, juicy
pigs and other viands have been pre
pared for this occasion and this prom
ises to be one of the events of the day.
After the dinner has been cleared
away s'lort exercises will be conducted
. . , . i ti, .t
in Bridgeton ana tnen tne wooiimrn
will march arross Neuse river to this
city and O Cedar Grove ce nctery.
At 3 o'clock the exercises at Cedar
Grove c-mctery will begie. Rev. J.
B. Swain, a memlicr of the Bridgeton
Camp will deliver the unveiling ad
dress and this will be followed by the
usual ceremonies attending events of
this kind.
This Is prescription prepsrsd especislly he the means of impressing upon the Life School is going to be very popular
IOf MALARIA or CHILLS FEVER, a(trr the wisdom of adopting the mcth
B4 AS Brill . u A AAA AAA
If taken then us s tonic the Fsver will not , od that have made possible thc success
n. It acti on the liver better than . ot t rtc
mel snd does not ripe or ilcken. 25c
with Craven county farmers and thai
his presence among tjKni is going to
prove effective in increasing their
ng to inc
I ros-
rity ana in aqunig tu t,nvi npyiH- j
PURCHASES HANDSOME MOTOR
DELIVERY WAGON.
The Co-Operative Supply Company,
better known as "Thc Consumers'
Store" have purchased a large and
attractive motor delivery wagon and
arc. now in better position than ever
to ivr their patrons the quickest
service possible. The machine is one
of i Ia latest models of its kind and is
ne I lie, (UnU
41
    

Page Text

This is the computer-generated OCR text representation of this newspaper page. It may be empty, if no text could be automatically recognized. This data is also available in Plain Text and XML formats.

Return to page view