North Carolina Newspapers

    Hi I
SUE
HUM
No. 148
NEW BERN. N. C, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31 1913 SECOND SECTION
35th YEA
FLEET OF BOATS IP' ' .. MR
CONG. J. K. FJUSON
MRS. EATON AGAIN
ON WITNESS STAND
FEDERAL COURT
NOW IN SESSION
SEASON TICKETS
TO VISIT FAIR
HE
SULZER'S CHARGES
TO
r
Petit
MURPHY DENIES
MUS
SOLD
FAIR
GROUND
HRISLS KHUULS
Dis
POLITICIANS ON QUI VIVE
Rumored That Three Investigation
Against Postmaster It To
Begin At Once.
Hon. J no. M. Faison, Congressman
from this district, will arrive in New
Bern today from bis home at Faison,
N. C, where he has been spending
several days.
Congressman Faison is coming to
New Bern presumably to visit the
Eastern Carolina Fair but those inter
ested in political circles, and who keep
in touch with the politicians and their
doings, know that his visit here Is
mainly for another purpose and every
one is awaiting the developments with
the greatest interest and anticipation.
In an exclusive story carried by
the Journal a few days ago came the
information that Postmaster J. S.
Basnight, who has been in charge of
the local office since June, 1910, had
been asked to resign on account of
charges which had been made against
him. Postmaster Basnight emphatically
refused to do this and it was understood
that an investigation of the charges
would be started this week.
This matter was first taken up with
Congressman Faison and on this ac
count he is to be in charge of the
investigation. Whether this will Mrt
today is not definitely known. However
re is sate to say that something will be
done in the matter during the next day
or two.
If the charges are substantiated and
Postmaster Basnieht is removed an.
other Postmaster, will, of course, be
appointed as will also a new assistant.
Speculation as to who will iret this an-
pointment, if such it necessary, is rife
ana tne citizens of New Bern await
the outcome with baited breath.
FOOTBALL GAME NEXT SATUR
DAY AFTERNOON.
- Interest in , the football game be
tween the team of the Ghent Athletic
Association and the second team of the
Agricultural and Mechanical College
which is to be played in this city on
next Saturday, increases as the day ap;
proaches.
Both teams are strong organizations
and there is not the slightest doubt
but that the game will be an interesting
one from start to finish. An admission
fee of twenty-five cents will be charged.
A stitch in time beats two in the
side.
OF
AIRGRETTES MAQE
CUSTOMS OFFICIALS PLUUl
PLUMES VALUED AT $600
i FROM WOMAN'S HAT.
New York, Oct. 28. The largest sin
gle seizure the customs inspectors have
made since the new regulations prohib
iting the importation of aigrettes went
into effect is on record at the customs
house today as that of plumes valued
at $600 taken from Miss Edna Mc
Laughlin, daughter of a former police
inspector here, who arrived yesterday
from Europe.
The young woman had frankly de
clared the fine feathers as part of her
apparel which was valued in all at $8,
000 and was shocked when she learned
that, regardless of her declaration, the
inspector must seize the aigrettes.
She protested that she bought the
plumes in this country but learned to
her dismay that only 24 hours before
arrival, an order had been issued for the
seizure of all such feathers whether or
iginally purchased in this Country or
abroad.
Finished with explanations, the in
spector finally plucked the costly plumes
from the hat they were adorning and
sent them to the appraisers stores. They
will, undoubtedly, in view of the un
equivocal tangle of the law, be consign
ed to the furnace In the rtfwment of
the public stores.
KINSTON FIREMEN ARB COMING
TO THE FAIR
Kjnston, Oct. 28 The Caswell and
East Kinston fire companies are prac
tising hard each afternnoo now in pre
paration for- the firemen's tournament
to be held at the East Carolina F.I, i
New Bern onFriday. The companies
win taxe anout ten men each to New
Bernwhere the teams will be entered
in horse hose wagon events against
ik lit, teams from other towns. With
the exceedingly good records III. nil- hv
the local firemen at previous tourna
ments, It is certain hat they will
make creditable runs, and may bring
luck prwe money.
Congressman Prom 1 This
trict Will Arrive This
Morning.
SEIZURE
Cross Examination of Defendant
Will Be Continued Today
Denies Testimony.
SHOWED 8IGNS OF FATIGUE
Most of Day Taken Dp Telling of
Former Letters Written Con
cerning Her Husband.
Plymouth, Mass., Oct. 28 The cross
examination of Mrs. Jennie May Eaton,
Who is on trial charged with poisoning
her husband, Rear Admiral Eaton,
was still uncompleted when court
adjourned tonight. She had then
been on the stand 2 hours, six hours
under direct examination Saturday
and six hours in the hands of District
Attorney Barker today.
Her cross examination will be con
tinued tomorrow and indications were
that she would be a witness for at
least another day, for at adjoun
, the district attorney had not
questioned her at alt regarding the
death of Admiral Eaton or incidents
surrounding it
The witness showed signs of fatigue.
She answered questions readily, how
ever. Much of tne examination touay
had to be with numerous letters written
by the defendant. Regarding one of
these, written in 1909 the witness said:
"The Admiral's brain was full of
drugs. He was almost childish at
times and should have been operated
upon. If he had been he would have
been alive today."
Mrs. Eaton repeatedly contradicted
testimony given by witnesses for the
prosecution, included thatj of her
daughter Dorothy, who had said that
her mother gave the Admi al medi
cine in his tea and ther bev rages.
Mrs. Eaton admitted that she had
bought this medicine on two occas- j
ions. Once she said she told the
Admiral about it, and gave it to him
with his knowledge, but the other
time she did not use it. 1
"I never could have deceived Ad
miral Eaton. So expert was he in
medicines that he would have de
tected it immediately," she said-
Some of the medicine she got fo
the Admiral he liked so wall that he
"ate it like peppermint," she declared.
Explaining a phrase in one of her
letters which referred to the "rotten
ness of the navy," Mrs. Eaton said
she believed the Admiral's mental
condition was due in a large measure
to his life abroad while in the navy.
"I was very fond of the Admiral and
pitied him deeply," she replied when
asked regarding testimony that she
had endeavored to have Eaton put
away. She explained that she merely
wanted to have him put in a sanatarium
for three or six months as she believed
it would cure him.
'Did you ever see the Admiral use
drugs?"
"Yes. Dozens of times" was the re
ply. "He would eat drugs from the
palm of his hand and almost imme
diately his eyes would set and become
glassy and he would appeir as though
intoxicated.
Admiral Elton was ashamed of his
drjg habit, the witness said, and often
she had known him to sprinkle whis
key on his coat and even on his mous
tache m order to give the impression
that liquor was responsible for his
condition.
Going into details regarding neigh
borhood gossip abouonjairs . -ofhe
Eaton family the witness 4tA: Vl
came from an extlusivV family and I
cannot understand all this gossip, f
sit and gasp at the dowdmess os New
England women. Southern women
would be clever enough to know which
of two parties was short of br ins."
Und r the questioning of the prose-
c tor, Mrs. Eaton repeated her story
of Saturday regarding her early life,
and of her meeting with Admiral
Eat n.
The Admiral was very intemgerate,
she said. "It was only when I saw
that he was going to kill himself that
I dcided to marry him," she said.
"Then you married him to save his
life?" asked Mr. Barker.
"Yes, I married him to s ve his
li e," replie rs. Eiton.
ALLEN CLAN DAMAGE SUITS
TAKEN UP.
Richmond, Vs., Oct. 28 Judge Wal
ter R. Staples, of Roanoke, was today
designated by Governor Mann to sit
for Judge A, A Campbell of the Wythe
viile -Circuit Court to try a number of
chrll cases against members of the Allen
family of Carroll county, the suits being
the result of the Hillsville tragedy
March 4, 1912.
Judge Staple, presided at the mur
der trials of the Allen gang last year.
The suits have been set for trial oa
November 7th.
Should verdicts be returned against
the estate of Floyd, who, with his son
Claude wasfelectrocuted, and Sidna
who is nowjservingja thirty five year
sentence in the penitentiary, the prop
erty of the Aliens will be sold to satis
(V Judgment
Convened Yesterday Morning And
Grand Jury la
Drawn.
JUDGE H. G. CONNOR PRESIDES
Case Against Elisabeth City Ed
It rX Will Be Taken Up
Today.
Federal Court for the New Bern
district convened in this city yesterday
morning with Judge H. G. Connor
presiding. Practically the entire fore
noon session was consumed in the
drawing of the jury and the Judge's
charge to these gentlemen.
In his charge Judge Connor fully
covered all points of the Federal laws
in a concise mannrr and carefully
explained to the jurors their duties
and what tlfcy were expected to do.
One of the most interesting cases
taken up during the day was that of the
Unit d States vs hade Johnson and
his wife Lena Johnson, in which they
are charged with aiding and abetting
a prisoner to escape from a Government
officer. Johnson was placed under
arrest a few months ago by Deputy
Marshal Lilly on a warrant charging
him with retailing spirituous liquors.
After being taken in custody the
prisoner requested the officer to allow
him to go by his home so that he could
inform his wife of his arrest. Not
suspectin any foul play the officer
granted this request.
Arriving at Johnson's home it is
olaimed that Lena Johnson covered
the officer with a shotgun and that the
prisoner escaped during the excitement.
Later they were both placed under
arrest. The case is an interesting one
and will probably be concluded this
morning.
The case in which W. O. Saunders,
the Elizabeth City editor is charged
with sending obscene matter through the
mails, will probably be called today.
Defending Mr. Saunders will be A. D.
Ward, of this city, Ex-Gov. W. W. Kit
cin, of Oxford and Colonel Harry Skin
ner, of Greenville.
WALKED WE
HUNDRED MILES
i
PEDESTRIAN 'WAS ENROUTE TO
a THE "PEN" TO BEGIN
SENTENCE.
Little Rock, Ark., Oct. 28. An
error inthc court routine caused "Buck"
Patterson to walk 360 miles to begin
his sentence of five years in the peni
tentiary here for manslaughter. Pat
terson, fifty-six, was convicted at
Russellville, 180 miles from here. He
had always borne a good reputation,
and upon his request was allowed (o
make the trip alone. J
He rode to little Rock," but when he
reached the State Prison was told his
commitment papers had not arrived
Penniless, he walked back to Russell
ville, secured the papers and then
walked back to Little Rock, covering
the distance in a week. Something was
wrong with the papers, however, and
admittance was refused. Patterson had
a lawyer friend start legal proceedings,
but was admitted to the prison today
before the case was called.
LOSES BATTLE
NEW YORK CLOTHING MER
CHANT SUCCUMB8 TO MER
CURIAL POISONING.
New York, Oct. 28 Isaac L. Levy,
a retired Brooklyn clothing merchant,
died this afternoon from the effects of a
slow poison he took by mistake eight
days ago. His eleven children stood
weeping by the bedside. Mr Levy,
heart-broken, remained in the seclusion
of her home, unable to come to the hos
pital
Levy was cheerful to the end and
fought like the Georgia banker similar
ly poisoned sometime ago against the
sure approach of death. He lapsed
into unconsciousness only this morning
A REAL DETECTIVE STORY.
The trunk of a woman's body was
found on the banks of the Hudson
River. The woman bad been murdered
Her identity was unguessed. The sole
clue to the crime was a pillow case
wrapping with peculiar markings. The
mystery, balling to the extreme, was
solved through clever detective work
The detective in question was Inspector
Joseph A. .Faurot of the New York
Police Department. His story will be
told grapffkally in the 24-Page Illus
traced Magasine of next Sunday's New
York World. Miss this great story and
you will miss much.
POISON
VICTIM
One Dollar Gains Admittance To
Fair Grounds Remainder
Of Week.
Committee To Visit business
Men And Citizens
Today.
Season tickets for the Fair were on.
sale yesterday at Wood-Lane Drug
Company's store, Davis' pharmacy,
Edward Clark's cigar store and A.E.
Hibbard's jewelry store and quite a
"number were disposed of. These tickets
contain coupons admitting the holder
to the grounds every.; day during the
Fair an3 cost only one dollar each.
There are many who will be in attend
ance every day until the close of the
Fair and they will save fifty cents
by purchasing these tickets, while if
there are any visitors who will be in the
city only two days longer they can pur
chase a ticket just as well as paying
two fares at the gate as both cost the
same.
A few have the idea that these tick
ets only admit to the grounds one time
during the day. This is erroneous. The
holder of a season ticket may go into
the grounds as many times during the
day as he or she may desire, being given
gate check every time they go out
and the tickets are pod for admittance
all during the day
New Bern people are greatly inter
ested in'the Fair and want to see it
prosper and the Fair Association
Company appreciate their support and
good-will, but the Fair's advancement
depends entirely upon the patrons.
One gentleman has suggested that
business men and firms who employ
assistants, purchase several of these
tickets and present them to their em
ployes and allow them to attend the
Fair. Not only will it be aiding to make
the Eastern Carolina Fair an established
institution, but it will also show the
employes that their efforts to please
are appreciated. Another well known
business man- suggests that the mer-
hants purchase several of the tickets
and present them to their best customers
with their compliments. Both sugges
tions are good ones and worthy of at
tention, i
This morning a committee of the
members of the Fair, Association Com
pany will go out among the citizens
of the city to sell these tickets and it is
safe to say that before this afternoon
a large number will have been disposed
of. Every public spirited citizen should
purchase several tickets and show
by this that they are interested in tfte
development and perpetuation of the
Eastern Carolina Fair.
HIS GUN KILLS DAUGHTER
EImira Oct. 28 The Sunday outing
of Walter H. Rowley of Pcnn Yan had
a sad ending when the double-barreled
shotgun with which he was shooting
ducks on Lake Keuka was accidently
discharged, killing his only daughter,
Ruth, who wasVnjoying the sport with
her father.
F'ather and daughter had been spend
ing the day hunting and fishing and
were in a boat on the lake. The father
bad just shot at some ducks and had
reloaded his gun which he placed in the
boat while he was endeavoring to re
cover one of the bids from the water.
The gun was discharged and the shot
struck the girl directly over the heart,
causing death in about five minutes.
BUSY DAY IN FEDERAL COURT.
Number Of Cases Were Disposed
Of Yesterday.
Quite a number of cases were disposed
of at yesterday's session of Federal
Court.. Among these was that in which
Shade Johnson and wife, Lena, whowere
charged with aiding and abetting
Federal prisoner to escape were on trial.
The woman was found guilty but
owing to her physical condition judg
ment was suspended.
Robert Edwards of Onslow county,
was found guilty of retailing without
a government license and judgment
was suspended upon the payment
of the costs.
Allen Joyncr, guilty of the same of
fense was given six months in jail
and Lula Joyner, also charged with
retailing without a government license
was sentenced to serve a four months
ntence in jail.
In the case of Joseph Evans, guilty
of retailing without a government
license, judgment was uspended upon
the payment of the costs of the case.
HUNDREDS VISIT THE ATHENS
THEATRE.
Last night was a "big night" at the
Athens Theatre, and so large was the
crowd that many could not be ad
mitted. The show was up to its usua
standard of excellence and every one
who visited the theatre was greatly
pleased. In order to give the employes
an opportunity .-of attending the Fair
the managers of the Athens have
announced that they will cancel their
matinee performace this afternoon.
Admits, However, He Did Get
$25,000 Campaign Contribu
tion, But Returned It.
DONOR,
HOWEVER, I S DEAD
Eyes
Of The Political 'World
Now Watching Fight
In New York.
New York Oct. 29. Charles F. Mur
phy gave out a long statement tonight
in teply to the charges recently made
by William Sulzer. Of the accusations
uttered by Sulzer in his campaing
speeches and in newspapers, all but one
are denied by the TammanyHaII leader.
The exception related to a $25 000 cam
paign contribution of Judge Beardsley.
Sulzer said he rejected this contribution
upon learning that it came from Antho
ny N. Brady and that the money sub
sequently went to Murphy who he de
clared had made no accounting of it
Murphy said to night he received the
money from Beardsley but returned it
to Mr. Brady the following day. Mr.
Brady died in London last spring sev
eral months after the incidents mention
ed by Murphy and Sulzer.
Murphy in his statement cited that
Sulzer did not make his charges before
the court which impeached him. "Why
was Mr. Sulzer afraid to face the court
and make his statements under
oath on the witness stand?" demanded
Murphy.
"I was willing to appear. He declined
to appear. Mr. Sulzer tried to arouse
prejudice by publicity asserting that the
solemn verdict rendered by the highest
court in the State was due to my in
fluence. The fact is that only one
responsible for the disgrace and down
fall of Governor Sulzer is William Sul
zer himself."
Murphy denied categorically charges
that he offered to pay off Sulzer's debts;
that he met Sulzer at specified inns al
leged by Stilzef ; that he-suggested t
tain men for heads of State depart
ments; that he demanded pledges re
garding legislation; thit he sent a
threat to Sulzer regardingan appoint
ment of highway commissioner for
amis E. Gaffney that it would be
'Gaffney or war"; that he attempted to
influence Sulzer in the matter of ap
pointments to judiciai-y positions; th-u
he threatened to disgrace Sulzer and
wreck bis administration; that he ever
told Sulzer he would "stand by" Stil-
wcll former Senator, now in Sing Sing
for accepting a bribe to expedite state
legislation; that he threatened Sulzer
with impeachment if Sulzer did not "call
off" John A. Hennessy, Sulzer's graft
investigator; that he met with advisers
and decided on Sulzer's removal from of
fice, and that he ever received $10,000
Sulzer said he received as campaign
contribution from Allan A. Ryan and
sent to Murphy.
After acceding to the demand of Ed
ward F. McCalt, Tammany Hall candi
date for Mayor, that he put in wtiting
his charges against McCall, John A. Hen-
Hennessy, graft investigator for the
deposed Governor, tonight again re
iterated at an uptown meeting, many
of the statements contained in those
charges. The speaker postponed tonight
his promised speech dealing with his
interview with former Senator Stephen
Stilwcll, but displayed a large volume,
which contained he declared, the
transcript of Still well's story as it was
told to him in Sing Sing prison. The
story, it is said, was taken by means
of a telephonic device.
"I'll tell the Stilwell story tomorrow
night," Hennessy a-ssured the crowd.
James D. ( lelland, counsel for Stil
well, issued a statement tonight, in
which he denied thct !iis client bad made
confession to Ilc.inussy, involving
Democratic leaders.
NOIL JNO. M. FAISON HERE.
Congressman In The City For Few
Days.
Hon. J no. M. Faison Congressman
from this district arrived in the city
yesterday morning and spent the day
conferring with friends and attending
to official business.
Congressman Faison will spend today
in the city and tomorrow morning
will go to Beaufort where he will meet
Major H. W. Stickle and spend a day
or two going over some waterway
surveyi and making an inspection
and will return here about Tuesday.
VISITORS URGED TO STOP AT
C. B. C1.U RESTAURANT.
Visitors to the Eastern Carolina Fair
are urged to patronize the restaurant
being conducted by the CityBeautiful
Club in their pagoda. A very inviting
menu is being served there at popular
prices. This restaurant has been in
operation every day since the opening
of the Fsh- and has been well patronized
By purchasing your lunch there you
will be doing much to assist an organlsa
tion which in doinu a or-at deal for
the city of New Bern in various ways,
Visitors Requested To Travel By
The Neuse River
Route.
ROADS ARE IN BAD SHAPE
Boats
Leave Foot Of Pollock
Street Every Five
Minutes. '
The rain which fell yesterday, com
bined with the heavy traffic of the au
tomobiles and other conveyances put
the roads between New Bern and the
Fair grounds in pretty tad condition
and there will fie but little traffic
over them to day.
However, ample provision has been
made for transporting the visitors
to the grounds and back to the city.
A fleet of power boat9 large enough to
handle a crowd numbering as high
as fifteen thousand persons has been
secured and these will leave the foot of
Pollock street every five minutes dur
ing the day and evening.
The trip up Neuse river is alone
worth the small price of fifteen cents
charged for transportation between tile
park wharf and the dock at the foot
of Pollock street. It will not be neces
sary for anyone to walk from the boat
landing up to the Fair grounds. Au
tomobiles will be on hand to carry
all visitors to the grounds and to take
them back to the wharf when they de
sire to return.
The boats which will be in service
today and during the remainde- of the
Fair are roomy, comfortable and abso
lutely safe. It would be almost impossi
ble for one of them to capsize while
going up or down the river but, if
such should happen, there are life
preservers on board for every passenger.
By going by the water route all danger
of skidding or accidents along the road
are done away with and the trip is
absolutely safe.
Remember, boats leave the foot of
Pollock street every five minutes
and also leave the wharf at the park
every five minutes. Take this route
and make sure of getting to the Fair
ground. in time to see everything
that' is going on.
THE.
ARE
DR. ERNEST W. DUNN, CHIEF
MARSHAL, ACTS AS '
HOST.
Among the other enjoyable social
events of the week which the Marshals
of the Eastern Carolina have enjoyed
was a Dutch luncheon given last night
by Dr. Ernest Dunn, Chief Marshal,
in his suite in the Elks building.
There are about forty Marshals
and the majority of these participated
in this social fundtion and it was great-
DR. ERNEST W. DUNN
Chief Marshall Eastern Carolina
Fair.
ly enjoyed by all. Delicious refreshments
were served and everyone had a good
time.
Tomorrow night the Marshal's Ball
ill be held. This will conclude the
social program of the Fair, and it is
expected that it will be one of the most
brilliant events of the season. More
than sixty couples will be on the floor.
The ball will be held in Stanley Hall
and either Crouse's band of Winston-
Salem or Forbes orchestra, of Wash
ington, will furnish music for- the
occasion.
Hava you seen the latest
shoes ot tha Standard Shoe
Company's Store
Standard Shoe Company
sells the best Shoes ih
MARSHALS
ENTERTAINED
I H
town. Try us.
SAYS CRAVEN'S INSTITUTIONS
ARE AMONG THE BEST
IN THE STATE.
Hon. J. Y. Joyner, State Superin
tendent of public instruction, who was
in the city yesterday for the purpose
of delivering an educational address
at the Eastern Carolina Fair, but who,
unfortunately, decided to wait until
a more favorable time t do this,
was interviewed by a Journal reporter
yesterday afternoon.
Dr. Joyner says that he has visited
many of the schools in Craven county
and has found them in the best ofoa
dition and making rapid advancetHjfflg
He highly praised the work of &'Tlr' !
Brinson, county superintendent of pub
lic schools, and said that in s optnioa
a more capable ma n for the worlr
could not be found if the worfd" were"
searched over.
He stated that he is watching the
progress of Craven County harm
Life School with much interest and al
though it will be impossible for him
to be on hand in person on the opening
day, that he will be there in spirit
and will, later on, have the pleasure of
paying the institution a visit and in
specting the work in progress.
Dr. Joyner left at midnight for Bel-
haven where he will spend today.
LOCAL COTTON MARKET.
frBy G. W. Taylor & Sons.)
Middling JL2 1M
Good Middling .......Jl. lS '
Strict Middling ......:.:T3 3-4
FOSSE KILLS
WAS A NEGRO AND CHARGED
WITH BEING A HIGH
WAYMAN. Wadesboro Oct. 29; An unknown
negro one of two alleged highwaymen
was shot to death by a "sheriff's posse
under command of Sheriff Lpwery of
Anson county this afternoon about 5
o'clock on the main highway leading
into Wadesboro.
The killing by the sheriff's posse of
the unknown negro was the result ot
three desperate and partially success
ful attempts at highway robbery this
afternoon when three couJftry wagons
all driven by negroes werTasw up oy
two unknown negroes sad sauss mnnsy
secured. The holdups occurred along-
the main highway but at different in
tervals. The driver of the last wagon
held up Simon Dennett, attempted to
escape from the highwaymen in flight
and was shot three times and danger
ously if not fatally wounded. News of
the robberies was taken to Sheriff Low
ery at Wadesboro. The sheriff imme
diately formed a posse of some six or
seven men and started Hi pursuit. The
negroes were overtaken near the scene
of t heir alleged crimes and one of them
fell at the Srst volley from the posse's
guns. 1 ne otner negro succeeoea n
escaping. On the dead negro were let
ters of memoranda which indicated that
he either lived at Whitney or had been
there.
STORES AND MILLS
TO CLOSEJT NOOi
EMPLOYES ARE TO BE GIVEN
A HALK HUL1
Today at noon every ji aoufgctur
ing plant in the city and a large number
of the stores will d m aad Jve the em
ployes a half holiday so that they may
attend the Eastern Carolina Fair.
These employes have worked faith
fully during the past and the managers
and owners of the different establish
ments realize that they should be given
an opportunity to see the sights along
with the hundreds' of other people
who ran get oil for a day or mora,
The majority of the merchants
have already agreed to close teen?
places of business at noon and those
who have not already done so are urged
to "loosen up" and let their employee
off for a half day so that they can have
tome enjoyment. The public is reques
ted to do their trading before rooa
as the majority of the stores will he
closed after that hour.
COFLON'S AND HACKBURN B
CLOSE AT NOON.
Among the stores' which wttj deee
... . n r - -
today at noon will oe a. vvyivn i
bia department
and E. B. Hack-
b.ira's grocery
burn's dry goods
lithmeats will n
the day.
4,
RINT
    

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