North Carolina Newspapers

    1
mtftwL
No. 150
NEW BERN. N. C, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 12 1913- SECOND SECTION
PROMINENT DRUGGIST
OF HAMLET "KILLED
AUTOMOBILE OF EARL MORROW
OVERTURNED KILLING MR.
MORROW.
Hamlet, Dec. 10. Earl Morrow ,a
prominent druggist of Hamlet, was in
stantly killed and .Wilson Page, a lum
berman, his brother-in-law, seriously in
jured, when Mr. Morrow's automobile
turned turtle about 4 o'clock today near
West End. They had left about noon
for a hunting trip and information of
the accident was 'phoned here soon after
the accident. Both parties are promi
nent business men. Mr. Morrow leaves
a widow, a baby about three years old
father, mother and one sister. Mr. Page
is unmarried. Mr. Morrow was a prom
inent Mason and Elk and took a leading
part in business affairs of the town. His
body will reach Hamlet Thursday
morning and the funeral will be con
ducted Friday morning under Ma
sonic auspices. The injuries to Mr.
Page are said to be serious.
DENIES ASSERTIONS WHICH
HAVE RECENTLY BEEN
MADE HERE.
Since the beginning-' of the muddle
in the New Bern postoffice began,
there has been a persistent rumor
to the effect that George Howard,
whom J. S. Basnight placed in the
position of dispatching clerk after the
resignation of Clarence Crapon, was
a Republican.
Mr. Howard does not like to be called
a Republican and has asked the Journal
to set the public aright on this matter
He says that all of his ancestors hav'
marched beneath the flag of the Demo
cratic party and that he is also a fol
lower of Woodrow Wilson.
Just how the report got out that
Howard was a Republican is not known,
but it is supposed that it started with
the many other rumors which have
recently been rambling around New
Bern. -.
'"
BALTIMORE SHIP AS CONVOY
Catches Wireless At Night And
Hurries To The
Rescue.
NEW
BERN ELKS
THE DEAD
Py
Loving Tribute- To Their
Members Who Have
Passed Away.
EX-JUDGE GUION THE SPEAKER
Hon. Charles R. Thomas De
livered Impressive Eulogy.
Norfolk, Va., Dec. 9 One hundred
and ninety-seven passengers were taken
off the Rio Grande at sea Sunday morn
ing while the big ship was on fire and
thought to be in danger.
The rescue was made by the Mer
chants' and Milters' Transportaonri
Company's steamer -Suwannee, plying
between Baltimore and Savannah which
caught the Rio Grande's call for assist
ance about 2 o'clock and went immediate,
ly to tKe rescue. The Suwannee was
almost along side the burning vessel
wo hours later and in response to
signals from the Rio Grande lowered
lifeboats and sent, them to the burning
ship. wLm
The Rio Grande also had her lifeboats
hanging in davits loaded with passen
gers when the Sfjvance came up.
The rescue was made 205 miles
northwest of Diamond Shoals during a
severe southwest blow. There was a
high sea, but such perfect discipline
prevailed among the crews of both
steamers that not a boat was jammed
against the sides of either ship.
The crew on the Rio Grande were al
most exhausted by their fight with the
fire when help came.
The passengers did not know that the
ship was on fire until Saturday night,
it is said, although some of them had
spoken of the decks being hot and com
mented on the presence of most of the
crew below decks. No passengers were
permitted to go below, women- and
children being ordered to their rtate
totes. Wireless report, while meagre, state
that after the Suwannee had taken all
the passengers on board the crew helped
to fight the re on the Kio Grande
I The rescue, made befo-e daylight d
out at sea, marine men say, was one
of the most thrilling recorded. The fact
that not a boat was swamped and not a
single life tost is considered, under the
circumstances, almost miraculous.
One report from the burning ship says
that after the fire was gotten under
control the passengers were transferred
from the Suwannee back to the Rio
Grande. Another account states that
some of the passengers are still on the
Suwannee.
Wast taw
Tht worst caws, mailt 1 u( how loss MMdlot
n rated by UM wonderful, old rtlloblt Hi
Mater's AaUsestle Hosllac OIL It rsttrrr
rls sad Hosts at tht toautiai. c.ft,flJt
It is probable that no more impres
sive service has ever been held in New
Bern than the annual Lodge of Sorrow
of the New Bern Lodge of Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, which was
held in the Athens theatre Sunday
afternoon and at which one of the
largest audiences ever gathered in that
building was present.
The stage had been appropriately
decorated for the occasion. Most
prominent was an electric arch in the
centre, on which was written the
creed of the Elks: "The faults of our
brothers we write upon the sands;
their virtues. upon the tablets of love
and memory." Arranged around
this were twenty-one vacant chairs,
symbolical of the twenty-one members
who have gone to that bourne from
which no traveller returns. Farther
out on the stage was a table draped
with the national flag, and on this was
several of the emblems of the order.
Ont the st-ige with Exalted Rvler
W. W. Griffin were the speakers of the
afternoon and several officers of the
local lodge. The exercises were opened
by a selection by Mrs. Benton, Mrs,
M. R. Griffin, C. T. Pumphrey, Ro
berts and Willis. Following this Rev
J. N. H. Summered, pastor of the Pres
byterian church, delivered the invoca
tion. Following a short talk by Exalted
Ruler W. W. Griffin and several se
lections by the singers who added so
materially to the program of the even
ing, the memorial address was made by
Ex-Judge O. H. Guion, of the New
Bern bar.
Ex-Judge Guion is one of the State's
most brilliant men, and his address
was beautiful and impressive. To those
who listened with rapt attention to
the remarks of the speaker who told
of the object of the Elks Lodge and its
principles, of the innumerable good
deeds performed throughout the world
each day by this order, and of the found
ing of the Lodge of Sorrow, was inten
sified by the spirit of the occasion
and there was not a, one in the large
audience who was not visibly affected
For more than an hour Ex-Judge Guion
held his audience spellbound and at
the close there was evident by that hush
which shows unmistakably that the
speaker has made a profound impres
sion.
At the conclusion of the Memorial
Address, Mrs. M. R. Griffin rendered
effectively that beautiful song;
come to Thee.' During the past year
the lodge has lost one member, the late
David R. Davis. In his beautifu
eulogy to Mr. Davis, Hon. Charles R.
Thomas said:
As tbe years pass like summer
clouds, one after another of those
whom we have known and esteemed
enters the "dark valley of the shadow,
and departs to that "undiscovered coun
try from whose bourne no traveler
returns.'
"During the past year this lodge has
been called to mourn the death of one
of its members David R. Davis
"Coming in and going out among
us, full of life, hope and heppi
looking 'orward eagerly, cheerfully,
jojfully into the future; seeing there
no sliadows, only the bright sunlight
of peace and success, aad in the vista
of the years only still wider avenues
of business enterprises, still greater
joy in living; in apparent good health
our friend met with an untimely end;
closing his life work in his young man
hood.
"Why was he so stricken dowa
By what theory, what philosophy
what reason, do you explain the sudden
termination of a bright, happy, useful
life?
"These are questions constantly re
curring, questions as old as the ever
lasting hills, as old as human life itself,
yet 'ever new and recurring. Whatever
may be the solution of this great
mystery, and answer to these questions,
we cast find no consolation when one
whom we love and esteem meets an
untimely end, except in the thought
that God, Who controls the universe,
Who holds ia the hollow of His hand
the oceans, Who counts the saads upon
"And yet, how few of us ever expect
the coming of this greatest of all chan
ges in our human lives, the final
separation from the bright scenes, the
joys, the sorrows, the activities,
the ambitions of the world, and out
transition to another sphere of ex
istence, borne upon and across the
he seashore and numbers the stars of
aven, and yet who marks the tall
a sparrow, knows what is best and
oesit.and though His devine decrees
are immutable and mysterious, yet
they affect men and nations alike and
re the decrees of a loving Father,
wide and fathomless ocean of eternity.
"Whither we go we know not. We
only know heathen, as well as Christian
philosophers, since the days of Socrates
and Plato, have taught we are immortal,
and we can only look up and beyond
the mists and shadows which sur
round the dark valley into .the sunshine
which- rests above and beyond with
confident faith in the divine Master.
"The poet, Whittier, in that grand
poem, "The Eternal Goodness," imag
ines some beautiful islands of the sea,
nreal and far distant, which are full
of beautiful flowers and rare exotics,
and joy and peace and sunshine,
where it would be ecstasy to exist,
Realizing, the sin, the suffering,
passions, changes and chances of this
mortal life, he longs for these beauti
ful islands of rest.
"He cannot discover them, and so he
p tiently waits by the shore and lis
tens for the sound of the muffled oar
of the boat which is to bear him across
the ocean's billows.
And when that hour comes to us,
may we exclaim with Tennyson:
'Sunset and evening star.
And one clear call for me;
And may there be no moaning of the
bar
When I put out to sea.
CURRENCY BILL
DEBATE BEGUN
President
Ita
SENATE MAKES NO CHANGES
Believe That Bill Will Be Passed
sty December The
Twentieth.
Washington. Dec. 9. Senate chang
es in the administration currency bill,
so far. Will not cause anv orotracted round tne New Bern postttffice which
discussion when it soes to conference qmte a relief after the strenuous
Happenings oi tnc past tew weeks,
those who are keeping up with affairs
there realize that something else is
scheduled to happen during the next
few days and they are awaiting this
with much anticipation.
The Journal told yesterday morning
of the reinstating of R. E. Smith,
' 'But such a tide as, moving, seems
asleep,
Too full for sound or foam,
When that which drew from out the
boundless deep
Turns again home.
" 'Twilight and evening bell.
And after that, the dark!
And may there be no sadness of fare
well,
When I embirk.
"'For though from out our bourne of
Time and Place,
The flood may bear me far,
I hope to see my Pilot, face to face
When I have crossed the bar.'
"Those who love and serve their
fellow men may pass from the stage
of action, but they still live in the
affection and memory of their friends
and fellow citizens; and so, I am sure
if loyalty to conviction and duty
fidelity, charity and brotherly love
if Christian manhood can, as it does
prepare a man or transition to a highe
and nobler existence and cause hi
memory to survive, David R. Davi
still lives in his life and work.
"He has only passed from earth to
some happier existence, and we believe
that 'in the silence of the receding world
he heard the great waves breaking
upon the farther shore and felt upon
his brow the breath of Heaven's eter
nal morning.'
'There is no deathl What seems so is
transition.
This life of mortal breath
Is but an entrance to the home Elysian
The portal we call death.
" 'There it no death! The stars go down
To rise upon some other shore.
And bright in Heaven's jewelled crowa
They shine for evermore.
" 'There is no death! The leaves may
fell,
The flowers may fade and pass away
They only wait through wint'ry hours
The warm, sweet breath of May.'
To Mrs. Benton and Miss Mary
Willis and Mrs. M. R. Willis and C. T.
Pumphrey, George Stratton, David cu
P. 0. INSPECTOR ONCF 0 TIE
N THE CITYiViiiRYTHAW CASE
Wilson Confident
Paasag Before
Christmas.
Of
G.
sfmaa- ILf ar Dial Clt
G. Hemilwrlftht InvesHftatina
i i ntfl won aniiwn
Charges Against
Night Clerk.
The
Well Known
Wrangle.
MORE SENSATIONS EXPECTED
THE JUDGES DO NOT AGREE
Friends Of John Thomas Leave
Tonight For Wash
ington, D. C.
One
Are
Lo-
Too
While there is an air of quietness
with the House, in the opinion of
President 'Wilson. With administra
tion leaders he hopes for passage by
December 20th and smooth action in
conference that will permit the full
Christmas vacation for Congrss.
Senator Swanson, one of the admin
istration simnorters on the Rankin? I . . . . .
alfLj.j iU j , tM night clerk whom Postmaster
tion bill in the debate today, generally
analysing the measure, which he de
clared was the best remedy under
present conditions. He urged prompt
action aad praised the President high
ly for insisting upon currency reform.
Senator Swanson attacked the con
dition of the Mew York banks uring
the 1907 panic and drew a vigorous
Basnight dismissed from office just a
week before he received a dismissal
from the Postoffice Department. Ia
a previous article the Journal told of
the charges which had been preferred
against night clerk Smith and after
the recent sensational developments,
it was supposed that these charges
would be dropped
However, there's no such luck for which he would be a peril" .aid Je.
Says Questions
Much For The
war Courts.
Concord, N. H., Dec. 10. Judge Ed
ward Aldrich rules today that the
mental condition of Harry K. Thaw
must be determined in the Federal
courts. The court s announcement
was made at the hearing on Thaw's
petition for bail.
Attorneys for Thaw, who are at
tempting to prevent the extradition
of their client through habeas corpus
proceedings in the United States Dis
trict Court, and counsel for New York
State had agreed that the charge of
conspiracy to escape from the insane
asylum at Mattewan, N. Y., was. a
bailable offense when the question of
whether the prisoner, if admitted to
bail, would be a menace to the com
munity was raised by William T. Je
rome, special deputy attorney gen
eral for New York.
"We have very radical objections
to turning Thaw on the community to
Judge Aldrich held that before the
nrotest from Snat-nr O'firtrman who
quoted from the hearings before the j?i8ht clfrk Postoffice Inspector romei
Bankina- committee to show that "- nmwnKni was in me cuy
countrv banks had no trouble in ret yesterday making a quiet investigation bail was decided it would
" I f J.1 -1 1 A 1 ' . 1 1 . I -
ting funds from New York during the l,,CBe tMr8es ana e-"e no uudi be neCessary to determine the pnson
. j : about the fact that every effort is ,ntai conHition to the eetisfac-
Pan,c' leoiner to be made to out an end to the Li - tt:.j c.,. n;f,;,-.
a l ju. r. I-. . ... r . 7. 7 loss ot ic "uiitu -,v.v
n tt.., ucu.ic ,D . iciuin nK1 c erk's connect on w th the ..
. i :.: j i i iv-ouri.
w tiic piijioni rcvisiuu ucyciupcu I postothce. "The constitutional ouestion involv-
The charges made against him are led in this case," he added, "are . of
said to be trivial and the night clerk I such importance that I shall not pass
during the speech of Senator Nelson,
one of the Republican committee
71 I:?.: Z ha enied each and every one of them upon them myself, but shall forward
" v.s ssMtsj ii iiiuo vast, mv waii piwrv t LllClII do LiCMULlly af pugBtvre w "-
conclusively that there 19 no founda-1 Supreme Court of the United States.
tirn rr anv nno tvf tham I hat- ho wtil I TU 1 miaofmnM aro
.v,BHr anu urUu over .mo s-puu- opportunity of doine this concerned with Thaw's extradition, his
UMII LIIAHfl IUU IU1 VUgliUUt, LUC CM I CI
L i. - I, I 1 Zj.
I with Pvicttntr rnnHtf iahc Hnwovar
teejonteence. Senator Nelson advo- K rem4in)r it M rf duty ,
office,
faction of the Senate committee.
Democratic Senators forgot party
s believed by those who are familiar I status in New York, and his status in
New Hampshire.
Washington, Dec. 10 Judge Ald-
rich's statement today that he would
not pass upon the constitutional ques
tions involved in the Thaw case,
but would forward them promptly to
the Supreme Court of the United
Interest in the probable selection
I of a postmaster to fill the place of Mr.
Basnight, has not in the least abated
land; in fact, seems to increase as the
cated the adoption of many of the im
portant features of the Hitchcock bill
and declared the Owen draft and the I
Class bill which passed the House,
were defective.
n .Li' . t . r .u - i. f ,l. I
' 1 A v.. . .!t, . : r . L .. r i I i-iine .1-1 u n..i- talrpn in Snnremr
i . i i ,. i I ua.o ,u uy, n. ucitncaituu ui uic iiicuu I -""-..i " " " ' 1
uruyuscu ivuumai icscivc imuu , w . . . - , . i
r I f T - .. . 1 . r . I. .. 1-1... I I ntp.n, am ttifi mnff that f h ra
ould greatly strengthen the banking aT. """T T ZIZZ
C . XT1 I '"I L11C U1I1UC, SUCH I iVlUUUlY 111 W aoll" I " vuivi wiuv w v.--. -, "
syi.ie.il oi me coumry, uiiur iiou . .- . . - w . . . . , rmAt. a uv
'A ft... u U.L.:.. 1 l niiuu coiuerriiig Willi senator r. . i ui. a nv w '-'" - .- j
nto existence. He objected to the urK"'8 10 H'P'l '
double liability features of the new
b ill, as applied to the stockholders Of inigm a ruuman car-ioau 01 jo - - 1? .
the regional reserve banks. Stock- 1 nomas tnends will leave lor the r-- - .
holder, of local bank, are held under- capital city to hold a conference with W)" law , Prne
double liabihty, he said and to hold Senator Simmons, and it is said that
them to that liability in the reeional thay are "loaded to the brim" with
reserve banks would impose too great I reasons why their favorite should have
the place
a burden upon them.
REV. L H. M'WHQRTER
CQMES TOICENTENARS
REV. J. B. HURLEY, FORMER
PASTOR, GOBS TO ROCKINGHAM.
According to Senator Simmons'
statement to a newspaper man Monday
night, he will recommend one of the
candidates during the next few days
and until this has been done, local in
terest in the affair will not decrease ia
the feast.
MARINE NBWS.
Court for answer before they have
acted themselves and this can be done
only in cases where the decisions of
the circuit courts of appeals are final.
The only way in which the Thaw
case may come from the District Court
to the Supreme Court is said to be by
way of appeal from a decision render
ed by Judge Aldrich. In several cases
in recent years, however, where dis
trict judges considered the cases be
fore them of such importance that the
Supreme Court would be asked to re
view the matter, the Judges have not
considered at length and passed upon
the intricate points raised, but have
promptly handed down decisions from
(Special to the Journal.)
Oxford, Dec 8. The following ap
pointments were today made by the
North Carolina Conference of the
Methodist Episcopal church, South
The three-masted- schooner Edward
and Maud, Cant. E. A. Riinrins. in
command, is at the Atlantic Coast Line which appeals might be taken.
Railroad Co.'s warehouse taking
a cargo of lumber tor Baltimore.
As recognized constitutional ques
tions are involved in the Thaw pro
ceedings an appeal from the District
Court may go directly to the Supreme
Court instead of first going to the Cir-
The steel barge Agnes McNally,
rS PhilaHpInhia is also at the A C I
New Bern district, Presiding Elder, R- R- Co.'s warehouse taking on a cargo cuit Court 0 Appc'-
J. E. Underwood; Atlantic, S. B. Royal!, lumber for Philadelphia
Supply; Beaufort, T. A. Sikes; Bridge-
ton circuit, k. t. ritman; Carteret xhe three f,. Kiu)oner Chas. L.
Circuit, K 1. rulcher; Uover Circuit, Rhode, arrived in oort vesterdav from
L. B. Pattishall, Supply; Elm street Norfolk with a canto of frehrht for the
and cast tunston, i. m. Wright; m.rrhafB f hi ritv
ooidsDoro, at. jonn, ri. c. inompson;
St. Paul, N. H. D. Wilson; GoWsboro
Circuit, C. O. Durant; Grifton Ctr-
The gas freight boat Wave arrived ia
port yesterday from the straits.
Willis and T. J. Roberts are the Elks
indebted! or the vocal and instrumental
selections furnished for the occasion.
MEXICAN BANDIT NOT KILLED
YIT.
The steamer S. J. Phillips left
yesterday for Maple Cypress with a I
merchandise.
Bingham, Dec. 9. Posses con
tinned their search today in Utah
Apes mine for Ralph Lopes. The
discovery of Ms blankets and his
tracks yesterday indicated that ha
had not succumbed to poisonous
gases forced into the mine last week
to atphysiate him. Armed with shot
guns, deputies exploring the workings
were prepared for another underground
battle, auch as occurred November 29
when two of their number wars killed
The gSA freight boat Charmer left
yesterday for Swknsboro with a cargo
of general merchandise.
E. D. Dodd; Hookerton Circuit,
I W. Bradley; Jones Circuit. C. E.
nee; Kinston, H. A. Humble; La
H' inge Circuit, J. M. Carraway, Supply; I cargo of general
orehead City, D. N. Caviness; Mt
Ml ive and Faison, J.' H. Frisselle
Mrs. Olive Circuit, W. A Pilans;
New Bern, Centenary, E. H. McWhor
tar; Riverside, W. A. Cade, Junior
Preacher; Ocracoke and Portsmouth, I The two masted schooner Bertha
B. T. I pock. Supply; Oriental Circuit, I L. Morton, of Hobucken arrived ia
E. C. Glenn; Pamlico Circuit, C. H J port yesterday with a cargo of oysters.
Caviness; Evans Spring Circuit, K. T.
Hill, Supply; Snow Hill Circuit, F: B.. The gas freight boat Fannie Brevard
McCiU; Straits Circuit, W. B. Humble;! arrived in port yesterday with a cargo
J. B.l Hurley goes to Rockingham; I of sweet potatoes.
Rev.JJ. C. Wooten goes to Edenton
street, Raleigh; Rev. Harry M. North, I The gas iteihgt boat Bernice Cree
orroerly pastor Edenton street is made I left yesterday with a cargo of general
residing elder Durham district. merchandise.
GO WANS
Klngbf Externals
Is the oae
Standard piV
aration universally and
enthusiastically endorsed
by Doctor, Druggist, Lay
man. 60 WANS Can.
Pneumonia, Croup, Colds,
Coalkfl, Pleurisy aad all
ailments caused from la
lamination or Congestion.
Qownru PranaMlios huA ant
tfteergatsaMf ami utitlketory II
saws or maj prprtKa aarraw
fa our atoek. Wt comider ft a
irondfrful sucoss. -
THE HURRA T DRVQ 0f.
Ohrnola, 8. C, Julj 11, tit
BUY TO-DAY! HAVE (Til THE
aUPii aaasia. SI.
" SlWtl , mr I
    

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