North Carolina Newspapers

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35th. YEAR
NEW BERN. N. C. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 26 1913- SECOND SECTION
OFFICERS
AND
MEN EXECUTED
Members Of The Federal Gar
rUon At Guaymas Put
To Death.
HAD PLANNED TO DESERT
All Of The Commissioned Officers
And Sergeants Of Tenth
Ha tal lion Were Shot.
Hermosillo, Mex., Dec. 22. The com
missioned officers and many sergeants
and corporals of the tenth bat al lion of
the federal garrison at Guaymas yester
day were executed at sunrise at that
city, according to word brought here to
night. Officers and men of the tenth
were disarmed several days ago by Gen
eral Ojeda, federal commandant, when
he discovered that they were plotting to
desert to the insurgents.
Accompanied by three of the federal
officers, who surrendered to the insur
gents at Maytorema, General Obregon
field commander of the constitutional
ists in Western Mexico, last night re
turned here to assist in locating the scat
tered g.-oups of federal soldiers who had
deserted from the Guayamas garrison.
General Ojeda and his remaining
trops are In Guaymas, as far as could
be learned, but sentries reported that
one of the federal gunboats had dis
appeared. This was taken as an indica
tion that at least a part of the federal
garrison had departed for Mazatlan or
Manzanillo.
It was announced last night that the
services of neither officers nor privates
of the deserting federals would be ac
cepted in the constitutionalist army.
FIVE HUNDRED KILLED
BY VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS
Details Of Disaster On Island Of Ambrian, In
New Hebrides Group Reached Sydney-Awe
Inspiring Night Seenes.
Sydney, N. S. W., Dec. 22 Incom
ing steamers bring terrible details of
the recent volcanic eruptions on the
Island of Ambrim, in the New Hebrides
group, in which 500 natives lost their
lives. Witnesses of the disturbance
describe it as having been so sudden
and violent that they expected to see
the whole western side of the island
disappear.
With a terrific roar, which was fol
lowed with a rapid succession of artillery-like
detonations, all the craters
of the volcano entered into full activ
ity, spouting flames and lava, and
throwing out huge boulders.
Great streams of lava were soon
rushing down the slopes, cutting off
the villagers from escape. In one in
stance two currents of the molten mass
joined and made an island of one entire
section of a village. Here 50 or 60
persons perished.
The scenes at night were awe-inspir
ing. Flames shot into the air to a
height of a thousand feet, illuminating
the whole area of destruction. The
ocean seemed to boil as huge, super
heated masses of stone fell into the
sea and streams of lava poured into
the bay. Dust from the craters grad
ually formed a black cloud which
blotted out the stars.
The bay after the eruption, was filled
with dead fish and large numbers of
dead turtles. The water in the river
was hot.
The British hospital buildings were
wiped out, but previous to their des
truction the doctors pluckily removed
all the patients to a launch and es
caped with them.
BIG ILLICIT
STILL 15 F
Sixty-Five Gallon Plant Confiscated
Near Town Of
Vanceboro.
OUND
Pay $250,000 For Terrazas' Release.
Juarez, Mex., Dec. 22. Although ne
gotiations have been under way for pay-1
ment of J250.000 for his release, Luis
Terrazas, Jr., today still was held pris
oner by General Villa at Chihuahua. Th
father, whose vast estate, together with
that of the Creels, was confiscated
through a decree issued by Villa, at
tempted to procure the prisoner's re
lease and safe conduct to the border,
first through an appeal to Washington
and now by the payment of money to
the rebels.
When Temvas, Sr., acujmpftoiedjthe.
tedi-rals in their flight to the border
the women members of his family re
fused to leave. They arc still in Chi
huahua, helping in their efforts tore
lease Terrezas.
Terrezas was not charged with any
activity against the rebels, but was ar
.ested because of his father's great
wealth. The elder Terrezas was report
ed to have taken much of his cash and
securities to the United States, and
Villa is asking for the return of some of
it-. The division of the million acres of
Terrezas' land among the rebtls is one
of the planks of the revolutionary platform.
ALLEGED OPERATOR IN JAIL
1 hssisSvaader -wst-aad besaga-him i The defendant-excused his forger i
Looters Will Be Shot.
Chihuahua, Mex., Dec. 22. "Anyone
who hereafter loots or molests property
of foreigners or Mexicans will be exe
cuted. The right to confiscate property
will rest only with the constitutionalist
government."
General Francisco Villa today issued
this order as showing his intention to
maintain strict military discipline. As
an example he executed on the plaza a
band of rebels who had been found guilty
by court martial of sacking the home of
a wealthy Mexican. While the six reb
els were marched before the firing squad
the stolen goods were returned to the
owner. "
All stores confiscated from the ex
pelled Spaniards today were closed and
sealed. Orders were given that no more
goods are to be taken from them.
Sheriff Richard B. Lane And
Several Deputies Due Credit
For Their Work.
One of the most successful raids
ever made in this section took place
yesterday afternoon when Sheriff R. B.
Lane, accompanied by Deputy Sheriff
J. W. Huff, Samuel Lilly and Will
Bonds went to the home of Leon Laugh
inghouse, about four miles from Vance
boro and after confiscating a sixty
five gallon illicit still, took Laughing
New York, Dec. 23. The procession
of alienists began their march to the
witness stand today in the trial of Hans
Schmidt for murder. After Dr. Smith
Ely Jelliffe, of New York, had testified
for the defense, court adjourned early to
enable Schmidt's attorneys to construct
hypothetical question which will be
put to Dr. Jelliffe and other medical
experts tomorrow.
Practically all Dr. Jeliffe's testimony
was that Schmidt was abnormal. The
witness said the priest complained to
him that his bishops and fellow clergy
refused to acknowledge his authority."
BUSINESS GOOD.
Satlsafctory Condition Down At
Oriental.
to tnts city and placed him in the coun
ty jail.
Sheriff I .am: arid several of his depu
ties went to Laughinghouse's home
ubout two weeks ago and made a search
of the premises, but at that time they
failed to find anything which even
resembled a still. However, Sheriff
Lane had reliable information that
Laughinghouse was engaged in the
business of illicit distilling and he
mad: up his mind to catch him napping.
Yesterday morning the Sheriff and
the parties mentioned above, left
New Bern in an automobile. they
reached Laughinghouse's home without
any delay and started a search of the
premises. Laughinghouse was on hand
and was at once taken into custody
and kept under guard while the search
was being made. The searchers found
a spot which they judged to have
been the location of the still but the
object of their search was not to be
found there.
A close inspection of the premises
showed that on a trail leading down
through the woods there was a quantity
of soot. Sheriff Lane at once came to
the conclusion that the still had been
hurriedly taken up and carried to some
other point and secreted. This trail
.of soot was followed up and in the center
ot a marsh some distance away was
found the still, it having been carried
there when it became known
that the officers were in that section
Laughinghouse denies all knowledge
of the operation of the still but Sheriff
Lane believes that he has a strong case
against him and that he will be con
victed when the case comes to court
John Gibson, dne of the prominent
citizens of Oriental was here yesterday
and while in conversation with a Journal
reporter, stated that business conditions
in that town were very gratifying just
at this time.
Oriental and surrounding section wai
One of the sections which suffered
considerably during the SeptemLet
storm and flood, but the people there
were not dismayed by the dam.-ige
wrought and cheerfully started out
again to repair the loss.
That Christmas feeling is in the air
there as well as in New Bern and, ac
cording to Mr. Gibson's statement:
the citizens are preparing to observe
the occasion in a very t efitting manner-
PlAsfrlrir I
Bitters
Made A Nw Man Of Him.
'I wan suiterlng from pain In my
omach, toad and tawk writes H.
0, -and my
twork rlfht.
four bottles of Elect) Hitter
QkiauwW feel Ilk a new man."
jtf 60Tt. AT ALL DRUt STORE t.
TIE MUHICIPLE TREE
A COMPLETE SUCCESS
THOUSANDS VIEW SPECTACLE
A8 THE BAND
PLAYS.
ALIENISTS TEST1EY III
THE SCHMIDT TRIAL
COURT ADJOURNED EARLY TO
ENABLE COUNSEL TO CONSTRUCT.
of the signature of his professor at Mun
ich by saying " I was in high spirits and
good health and I entered into the per
sonality of the professor. I was the pro
fessor. So it was not wrong for me to
sign his name."
Dr. Jelliffe asked Schmidt if he ever
played the violin in a bath tub, as a for
mer witness had testified. "I did," said
Schmidt'. "It was nobody's business
what ah inspired man does. Heaven
wishes him to do."
During one of his visits to Schmidt's
cell, said Dr. Jelliffe, another physician
who accompanied him, pricked his
forefinger with a needle and showed the
prisoner a drop of blood. Instantly
Schmidt's face became livid. "All blood
is mine," he shouted, making a lunge
for the physician's hand and trying to
raise it to his lips.
FIVE KINS TON YOUTHS
ASSAULT LONE LOVER
SHOW HIM THAT
WAS STEEP
ROCKY.
HIS
AND
PATH
Winston, N. C, Dec. 23. Five young
men of the neighborhood of the Cas
well Cotton Mill in the eastern end
of the city, were fined in the Munici
pal Court for an assault upon Kelly
Alexander ofr the country. Alexander
drove into the city to visit a girl near
the mill. At the conclusion of his visit
the swain was waited upon by the Ave
and told that be would be given three
minutes to leave the vicinity. He was
willing to comply, apparently, but
about the time he was well under wav
la wheel came off his buggy. The tap
was gone. When the three minutes
had expired the delegation "commenced
D0
H AND WEBB
NOT IN YET
West Virginia Senator Takes A
Hand In TJte
Matter.
BALEY MARSHAL IN WEST
New Bern's municipal Christmas
tree which was erected on Broad street
near the corner of Middle Tuesday
afternoon by the City Beautiful Club,
was last night viewed by several thou
sand persons who were down in the
business district of the city seeing the
sights and mingling with the jolly throng
of shoppers.
It might be said that the tree was
formally dedicated last night. The
Peoples Concert Band furnished music
for the occasion and as the melodious
strains of several well known and
popular selections were wafted on the
air, those standing around were profuse
in their commendation of the occasion,
and the City Beautiful Club who are
responsible for the erection of the tree.
Tonight the tree will again be bril
liantly illuminated and the band will
again render a musical program. The
public ts extended a cordial invitation
to attend this event.
firing" and an uncomfortable period
for young Alexander followed. He es
caped injury fortunately, but only by
hastening from the locality.
R. L. Johnson of the same section
of the county as Alexander was the
victim of unscrupulous youths of an
other mill settlement. He also was
courting a young woman here. John
son's buggy harness was cut to pieces
and he was required to stay in town over
night. Country lads, in revenge,
cut to pieces bicycle tires belonging to
Clay Stroud and John Baker, young
men who went from Kinston to Wood
ington to attend a rural entertainment
Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Barrington and
daughter, Pauline, left "yesterday fo.
Pamlico to spend the holidays.
The stocking follows the flag,
Shopping weather all the while.
No cold storage brand of Christ
mas trees.
Senator Simmons Is Praised By
President Wil
son. "i.
Washington, D. C, Dec. 23. Sana-
tor Goff, pf West Virginia, success
fully blocked the confirmation of W.
T. Dortch and Charles A Webb, who
have been nominated for marshals to
succeed Dockery and Logan, when he
sent a telegram to Washington today
asking that these nominations be held
up until Ins return to the city, which
will be the latter part of next Janu
ary. Judge Goff said he wanted to
be heard before these nominations
were made, and of course, his re
quest will be granted.
Out of deference to Senator Over
man, who is the acting chairman, the
Judiciary committee today paved the
way for the confirmation of Webb and
Dortch by making a favorable report
to the Senate. But before an execu
tive session could be called, a tele
gram was received from Goff protest
ing. -This means at least a month's
delay before the confirmations can
be had. As nominations for judges
and district attorneys cannot be re
ported from the committee until after
a regular meeting of the committee,
the same delay will apply to Judge
Winston.
Judge Boyd today notified Senator
Overman-that he had appointed J. M.
Baley to act as marshal for the West
pending the confirmation of Webb,
Baley was chief deputy to Marshal
Logan.
Representative Godwin has secured
a special examination for Luther Mr-
Daniels, of Maxton, for postofnee in
spector. McDaniels is a railway mail
clerk. Mr. Godwin has appointed J.
E. Elliott, postmaster at Thornwall.
In a letter to Congressman Claud
Krtchhv-every member of the House
from the State pledged their support
in electing him chairman of the Ways
and Means committee to succeed Os
car Underwood.
Secretary of the Senate James M.
Baker has presented Senator Sim
mons with the first bound copy of the
Underwood-Simmons tariff bill to
come from the printers. The book is
something that not only Senator Sim
mons, but the people of the entire
State may well feel proud. In addi
tion to the autobiographies of every
Senator in Congress, the book con
tains a letter from President Wilson,
written in his own hand-writing, in
which the President takes occasion to
again assure him of his high appre
ciation of the work of the Senior Sena
ator in putting the tariff bill through
the Senate. The letter is full reads:
"My Dear Senator Simmons:
"I wcldpme this opportunity to ex
press again my warm appreciation for
your leadership in the great fight fo,
this bill and my deep sense of the
service you have rendered the coun
try. Ability, knowledge, tact and pa
tience combined to accomplish a great
thing. I
"Cordially and faithfully yours,
"Woodrow Wilson."
L. r. DANIELS TO TAKE
CHARGE JANUARY 1st,
His Nomination For Postmaster at New Bern
Confirmed Yesterday - Thomas Appointed
Income Tax Collector by Commissioner
Osborne.
Louis G. Daniels, who was last week
recommended for postmaster in this
city by Senator F. M. Simmons, will
take charge of the office on January 1,
his nomination being confirmed yes
terday. John Thomas, Jf., who was
appointed deputy collector of the in
come tax, was also appointed by
Commissioner Osborne and will take
charge of his new duties on the same
date:
The news of his confirmation reached
Mr. Daniels last night and the message
relative to the appointment of Mr.
Thomas also came in last night. It
was thought by Mr. Daniels' friends
that his confirmation would probably
Senator Simmons was desirous of get
ting the New Bern office in full swing
once more after so much turmoil
of the past few months and lost no time
in having the successful candidate
confirmed.
Nothing was said in the message
received here in regard toStepheoH.Lane
who has been recommended for assist
ant postmaster. However, it is believed
that he will go into office at the same
time with Mr. Daniels.
R. A. Nunn, who has been acting
postmaster since the dismissal of J. S.
Basnight, will remain in charge of the
office until January 1.
be delayed until after the holidays but
L.
I. MOORE NOT IN
RACE FOR CONGRESS
Prominent New Bernian Declines to be a Can
didateStates Reasons In Letter to Hie
Journal.
RALPH LOPEZ STILL'
IN THE UTAH MINE
BULKHEADS WILL NOT BE RE
MOVED UNTIL AFTER
HOLIDAYS.
Btngham, Utah, Dec. 24 If Ralph Lo
pes, slayer of six men, is still in the
Utah-Apex mine, where he took refuge
on November 27, he is securely sealed
up and will be held a prisoner there un
til after Christmas. Not a sound has
Come from the mine since December 14
when heavy bulkheads were erected in
the tunnel mouths to prevent a dash
for liberty.
Although Sheriff Smith, now in charge
of the man hunt was confident today
that the desperado is either dead or
alive in the mine many believe he es
caped shortly after smudges were lit
on December 1 for the purpose of as
phyxiating him and the mystery of the
mine will not be cleared until the bulk
heads are removed and the workings
searched for the gunman's body.
Other than the stories of miners who
said they had encountered Lopez and
talked with him there has been nothing:
to indicate Lopet's presence la, the mine
since November .10 following his killing
of two deputies In the Andy tunnel.
The pursuit of Lopes began on No
vember 21, after he had killed a Mexi
can. Before the day ended he had killed
the chief of police and two deputy sheriffs.
Preparations have been made to give
the prisoners in the county jail, and
the inmates of the county home,
unusually good dinner today.
aaaition to a very palatable mean,
fruits snd confections will be distributed.
J
Mercantile busincM with
.i. ,. ....... . m
rtrlSlaft fiitnra Hast Iw. ZSm
it.. :... t .L. ... L .-lBBBBBBB" wv au
. unit.. w ! - - v" me wm, iivu i, 'vni .m
' unusuallv (rood dinner tndiv. InlMtHIll tOWtl. LOUff UUI
land, MctHllum Mcbwain, Knott ..... , . ,. L. wiisVji
Hobson Siwhon, George Wheel- , un vuiiuiug. ttui sail i
a u.iu... a" coniecuuns will oc on.tr.- -Ai-ifJI. if tM K.
i mm ..-- mi i u Nweu wj snuii
Very few useless gifts wil) be din-1 A great many holiday "packages'! "Peace on earth," is found mostly jflSlH AstdrfeN BOX dMUW
covered bv the recintntts. 'An tint ot Inm tk m4 mut ik. rk.un.. i. IBl
Along about January lit the three
candidates for the office of Congress
man from this. district: Cong. Jno. M.
Faison, of Faison; Hon. Charles R.
Thomas, of this city, and George E.
Hood, of Coldsboro, will probably
make their announcements and officially
"come out."
It has been rumored that L. I. Moore
of this ctiy would be one of the candi
dates for this office, but this rumoi
is absolutely without foundation as is
evidenced by the following tetter
written to the Journal by Mr. Moore:
"To the Editor of Journal:
"I desire that you state foi me in
your paper that 1 have not seriously
considered, at any time, becoming a
candidate for Congress in this district
at the coming election. I appreciate
the compliment which your reference
to me in this connection contained,
but I find my time is occupied in the
practice of my profession and I am not
willing to give a divided attention
to any public duty. I have been urged
by many of my friends to become a
candidate at this time, but the demands
upon me in my practice make it quite
out of the question for me to do so.
It is an office of honor ind importance
to the people and I do not believe
it should be used as a means of gratifi
cation of any personal ambition o
occupied simply for the compensation
but solely for the service that can be
rendered to the people of the district
Yours truly,
Dec. 23, 1913. L. I. Moore."
This action on Mr. Moore s part
leaves the field open for three candidates
That the fight will be a warm one
there is not the slightest doubt. Each
of the gentlemen named above who
will enter tne race, have numerous
friends and they have been promised
their entire support.
AT BINGHAM
FALL TERM
CADETS DISTINGUISHED IN
SCHOLARSHIP AND
DEPORTMENT.
(Special to the Journal.)
Mebane, Dec. 23. The Bingham
School, near Mebane, has just closed
a successful fall term. The examina
tions are over and the cadets have re
turned to their homes for the holidays.
The deportment and scholarship
grades have been unusually High and
the boys speak of the faculty as one
of the best that they ever knew it
Bingham. The same efficient corps of
teachers has been engaged for the
Spring Term nd all of the boys say
that they will return. School will
reopen after the holidays, on Tuewlay,
January oth.
Major Adrian Nalle who stood first
in the military department at the
V. M. I. for four years' and who was
first captain in his senior year, has been
re-engaged to net as Commandant for
the spring term, which is his tfth at
Bingham. He will also teach military
science and tactics in the department
of Science. Major L. S. Gerow, a dis
tinguished graduate of the V. M. I.,
will continue to be in charge of the de
part men ts of English and German
Captain M. W. Hester, a leading
graduate of the Citadell, the Military
College of South Carolina, Will continue
to teaoh. French, Mathematics and La
tin. Captain 1. K. Cobb will again
be in charge of the department of
History and Captain Charles B. Mr
Cutchen wtU teach classes in Science
snd English. The department of
Bible, which for maav vcar has
been conducted by Col. Grey, will
continue in his charge.
The Bingham boys distinguished
oa scholarship and deportment on the
reports Just sen out are as follows:
Hassell Gibson, Preston Lewis Gray,
Jr., Norman Harney; Frank Harris,
Fred Jonas, Robert , Jones, Henry
Johr
Far
Procte
er ar
SEVEN THOUSAND DOLLARS
PAID TO BRUNSWICK FARMERS
BY TWO BUYERS HOLI
DAY TRADE GOOD.
Southport, N. C, Dec. 24. The holi
day spirit here this season has found
its usual expression in Christmas giv
ing. A few weeks ago there was I
feeling among the local merchants
that it would be a lean holiday trade
for them. But contrary to this there
developed a buying which has brought
up sales to an equal, if not an in
crease over last year.
Two contributing factors to this
trace to cause its increase, where
falling off was looked for, have been
the fishing interests of the Carolina
Coast Products Co., and the Ocean,
where a large force of men have been
receiving good wages, and the large
sales of holly in this lower section of
Brunswick county, one buyer of this
holly paying to farmers $5,000, an
other paying $2,000, this being in i
sense "found money" to the farmers.
uniortunatciy. witn too many an
extra quantity of "old boose" appears
to be a necessary requisite to the ob
servance of Christmas. While there
is an increase in number of liquor
packages arriving her this Christ
mas, there is a decrease in the quan
tity, and it might be added, perhaps,
in the quality of the wet goods.
OWEN H. GUI
IS A CANDIDATE
Ex-Judge Of Superior Court Will
Be In The Congressional
Race.
MAKES AN ANNOUNCEMENT
Is
A Man Of Marked Ability
And Sterling Char
' aeter.
The announcement of Judge O. H.
Guion which will be found elsewhere
in this issue of the Journal, will be read
with interest all over the State. Judge
Guion Will be in the race for Congress
next year aiding with: the several other
candidates and his friends . believe
that he will be the victor.
Judge Guion is a man of marked abil
ity. A shining light in the legal profes
sion of the State and a gentleman of
sterling character. It is at the request
of his numerous friends that he will
make the fight for election as Congress
man from this district.
irice bis retirement from the Super
ior Cow bench a few years ago Judge
Guion has been associated with his sons
Rodman and John, in the law business
under the name Df Guion and Guion.
His practice has been large and remu
nerative and it is by no means for mone
tary gain that he desires to represent
this section in Congress, but on account
of the fact that he believes he can be ot
real worth to this district.
Congnessmari Faison, the present
incumbent: Charles R. Thomas and
George E. Hood, who will also be in the
race, will have an opponent worthy'
of their best efforts in Judge Guion
and the coining fight bids fair to be oaa
of the hardest waged ever made in this
section.
ALLEGED DISTILLER SENT
BACK TO THE JAIL
LEON LAUGHINGHOUSE COULD
NOT RARE UP A
iLHf BOND.
Leon Laughinghouse, the white man
who was placed under arrest at Ins home
near Vanceboro several days ago by
Sheriff Lane and several of his deputies
on a war -ant charging him with op
erating an illicit distillery, was given
a preliminary hearing yesterday after
noon before Justice of the Peace W. F
Hill. ' .ft
The defendant stoutjtf piutasgad his
innocence, but 'the evidence aaaSjghl
out by attorney GeorgT. WiDJs, wh
represented the State, was of sue he .
incriminating nature that 'Squire Hill
found probable cause and bound bint
over to the next term of' Craven county
Superior Court under a bond of two
hundred dollars.
Laughinghouse made an attempt
te secure bail in this amount but failed
and was sent back to jail to await the
term of Court. '
ASK FOR RESIGNATION
OF POLICE JUDGE
ASHBVILLE PAPER PRINTS ALLE
GATIONS AGAINST JUDGE
JUNIUS ADAMS.
DIED.
Joseph Slade, colored, died at the
home of his parents, No. 10 Ash street J
December 23. The funeral will take plac
at 2 o'clock this afternoon at the Star
of Zien Church, M. Spruill officiating
Friends are invited to attend.
Ashevillc, Dec. 24. Demanding the
"voluntary or involuntarily retirement,
from office" of Judge Junius G. Ad
ams, of the city police court, the
Asheville Gazette-News of today car
ries ant article of six columns and a
column of editorial matter alleging
that . while sentencing bootlegger
and small dealers in whiskey to the
roads the presiding officer's law .firm,.
Merrimon, Adams & Adams, has acted
as attorneys for a liquor house in the
collection of bills for whiskey atteg-
ed to have been;
of fit Mattery
been operated for the past, two years
and which is said to have been closed
following the recent investigation by
Judge Frank Carter in this city.
Cos-fee of letters alleged to have
been written by the firm to W. E.
Sevier, proprietor of the barroom,
nd James L. Alexander, proprietor
of the hotel, are published in th lo-
paper together with affidavits
from P. II. Thrash and W. S. Dick
son, p the effect that Judge Adatfts
letted liquor bills from Sevier, ac
cording to the letter's statement.
GOOD DINNERS FOR THE
MATES OF THE JAIL.
;n sold at jffitjsh.rrnrn
Park HotwMch ha.
For
Sale
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