North Carolina Newspapers

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Vol. 17.
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA, CHAPEL HILL, N. C, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1909.
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OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION.
GOOD BALL THIS SPRING : INTER - COLLEGIATE MEET
8 TO 10 P. M. IT IS
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A HARD SCHEDULE OF GOOD
GAMES EIGHTEEN HERE.
PRIZES TO BE WON BY HISTORY
! STUDENTS.
Baseball this spring-is going to be
the real article. We. are going- to
have ag-ood team, and Manager Mas
ten has found good ones for us to
play with. Besides bur old rivals
we have some new ones.
The game with Amherst ought to
be a good one.;; Amherst beat Har
vard last year, their battery allow
ing Harvard one hit. Colgate is said
to have the best prospects that she
has ever had. Among other things
she has the battery of Amherst that
put a crimp on Harvard.
Mercer beat Georgia last year,
and will give us somethingto do to
win from her. The Central Universi
ty always has a formidable team.
Davidson is almost new, since we
have not had a game with her for
some time. It might be well to state
that we have never scored on her
in baseball, but we expect to do
more than that in the two games
this spriug.
The schedule represents hard
work, both in arrangement and the
games to be played. We have about
everything necessary to a good sea
son, good men, a good coach, and
g-ood games. The schedule follows:
March
13 Bing-ham (Mebane), Chapel Hill.
20 Oak Ridge
26 Bing-ham (Asheville), " "
29 Amherst, " "
30 . Amherst, "
April
1 Colgate, " "
2 Colgate,
3 Lafayette,
5 Lafayette, " "
8 Villanova, "
10 Guilford, Greensboro.
12 Winston League, Winston.
13 St. Johns, Charlotte.
14 Davidson, "
15 Delaware, Chapel Hill.
16 Delaware, " "
19 Virginia, Greensboro,
21 Guilford, Chapel Hill.
23 Davidson, "
26 Mercer Uuiv., "
27 Mercer Univ.,
30 Virginia, Charlottesville.
May
1 Villanova, Philadelphia.
3 Pennsylvania, "
4 Georgetown, Washington.
7 Central Univ. of Ky., Chapel Hill.
8 Central Univ. of Ky., "
Prizes For Work in History
The North Carolina Socie ty of
Colonial Dames offers two prizes of
$50.00 and $25.00 respectively for
the best and second best essays on
some subject relating to North Car
olina during- the colonial period,
presented by students of the Uni
versity of North Carolina.
GUILFORD-WAKE FOREST-A & M
DAVIDSON AND CAROLINA
WILL PROBABLY ENTER
.. TEAMS FOR TRACK
' MEET IN GREENS
BORO, APR. 19.
At a meeting of the Greensboro
Chamber of Commerce Saturday
night it was decided to have an
i nter-collegiate track meet in that
city on the night of April 19th
The meeting- was attended by the
track team managers from Fjon Col
lege, Guilford College, WakeForest
A. and M.,'aud the University of
North Carolina. All these institu
tions will be represented at the meet
and it is understood that Davidson
will also send. a team.
The meet will be held indoors in
the Greensboro Auditorium. The
Virginia-Carolina baseball game
will be played there on the same
date, so this will insure a large
attendance. The rules governing the
meet will be the same as those adopt
ted by the Inter-Collegiate Associa
tion of America. First place will
count five points, second three
points third two points, and fourth
one point. '. Those winning- first
place will be given gold medals,
second-place men will get silver me
dals and those capturing third place
will get bronze medals,- The Col
lege winning- the meet will be pre
sented with a handsome silver cup.
All the usuall track events will be
held except the two-mile race and
the hammer throw. There will be a
mile relay.
The Greensboro Chamber of
Commerce has offered to pay the
expenses of twenty men from each
college that desires to enter the
meet. This is one of the first steps
toward the development of track
athletics in North Carolina, and
should meet with encouragement on
all sides.
Carolina will send a team to the
meet, and Captain Shaw especially
desires that his team carry off the
laurels. Carolina should make every
effort to win as many of the events
as possible. While all the events
are open to the best man the need
for men in the high and low hurdles,
high jump, quarter mile run, shot
put, and pole vault is greatest.
There is a fine opportunity for men
who are good in any of these events
to make a piece on the team, and
Captain Shaw will be glad to have
all who wish to compete to come
out each afternoon at four o'clock.
Jaccocks has consented to help coach
the short distance runners, and will
be out to help each afternoon from
4:30 to 6otclock. Dr. Mangum will
also assist with coaching whenever
he gets time.
In addition to the meet in Greens
boro, Manager Eames has about
completed arrangements for meets
with three Southern Colleges, two
of which will be held here. He will
have his schedule complete by the
end of the month. There is some
thing in store for the men who make
the track team. It is to be hoped
that the competition for places will
be fierce, for in this way alone can
a winning team be turned out.
SOPHOMORES HOLD BANQUET
MARSE JESSE SPREADS HIM
SELF AND SO DO THE SOPHS.
RESOLUTIONS OF WEARERS OF
' N. C.
The Sophomore Class held its
banquet at the Uniyersity Inn last
Friday night, President C. W. Gun
ter acting as Toastmaster.
i Promptly at nine o'clock Dr. Eben
Alexander was presented and gave
an excellent address upon the effect
iveness of "Class Spirit", to which
Mr. EX F. McCullock responded,
his subject being "The Ideal Soph
omore." After the first course, Dr.
George Howe spoke on the advanta
ges and importance of "Class
Union", emphasizing his points
with many humorous illustrations.
Mr. W. T. Joyner replied, giving
an excellent description of "Soph
omore Life."
The second course was then served
and followed by the address of
Mr. W. S. Bernard upon "Ideal
Citizenship in The University"
Mr. J. P. Walters replied in a short
but characteristic speech.
As a fitting climax to the third
course came the address of Professor
M. C. S. Noble upon "The Present
Sophomore Class and that of Form
er Days" in which he vividly pic
tured tg conditions of his soph year.
Mr. W. A. Dees replied, giving the
class statistics in the various phases
of college life.
The program ended with cigars
and coffee, and many impromptu
speeches by members of the class.
About one o'clock the banquet ad
journed. Sweater Men Meet
At a recent meeting of the Wear
ers of the N. C. resolutions were
adopted to the effect that none but
those entitled to an N. C. shall be
allowed to wear any part or parts
of the uniforms characteristic of
the different Varsity teams, it be
iug the opinion of the club that the
uniform should be as distinctive of
the Varsity man as the N. C.
sweater. The wearing of parts of
the varsity uniforms has become
quite a common practice in class
athletics, and the Wearers of the
N. C. wish to state through this
article that a continuation of this
practice by anyone not entitled to
an N. C. will be considered as an
infringement on their rights.
The Wearers of the N. C. wish
to discountenance the wearing, by
others than varsity men, of the fol
lowing articles: first, blue stockings
with a white band around calf,
which constitute a part of the uni
form of the varsity football and
baseball teams; secondly, blue jer
seys with a series of white stripes
around the arm, which constitute a
part of the uniform of the varsity
football team; thirdly, white jer
seys with a series of blue stripes
around the arm, which constitute a
part of the uniform of the varsity
baseball team.
FACULTY WILL BE AT HOME TO
THE STUDENT BODY SUN
DAY EVENINGS.
IN
LIMELIGHT WITH
TORS.
THE ORA-
The lack and need of social inter
course between the members of the
faculty and of the student body
have been felt by both. The form
er lament the fact that they know
the great majority of students only
officially, and that the members of
their families know but few of them
at all. The students have accepted
the situation as they found it, and
the habit of calling- is limited toan
exceedingly small number of 'them.
The result has been a loss which
has been felt and deplored, no less
by the members of the faculty than
by the students.
This social segregation cannot be
corrected by the holding of public
receptions, or by any other func
tions so formal. These expedients
have been tried and are now hi use.
To the faculty they are distracting
occasions of meeting, and at once
forgetting the great throng- of
strange students. To the students,
the are principally occasions in
which they are made to run the
g-auntlet of introductions, aften
which they can retire to the campus
without having begun one new per
manent acquaintance.
A plan has been adopted, how
ever, by the faculty after consulta
tion with a number of students,
which should be the means of
bringing- faculty and students more
closely together. Beginning- next
week the fasulty will be "at home"
to the members of the student body
every Sunday from eig-ht to ten P.
M. This means that any and every
student will be welcome for an in
formal call.
Society News
The first section of the reg-ular
Junior-Senior debate was held in
the Phi Society Saturday night.
The query: "Resolved, That it
would be unwise policy for the
United States to establish postal
savings banks" was warmly discus
sed. It was decided that the affirm
ative won and that Mr. H. C Bar
bee made the best speech.
The regular Friday night section
ot the Di Society debated the query:
Resolved, That the influence of
labor unions for the last thirty yers
has been detrimental to the industri
al development of the United States.
The affirmative won. Mr. I. C
Moser was the best speaker and
Mr. Wharton received honorable
mention. At the regular Saturday
night menting of the society the
affi rmative again won the decision
and Mr. Boling Hall made the best
speech while Mr. T. J. Armstrong
deserved creditable mention.
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