North Carolina Newspapers

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DI MINSTREL-REVUE
Memorial Hall
Tonight 8 :30 Tomorrow
WEIL LECTURES
William Allen White
April 3, 4, 5
VOLUME XXXIII
CHAPEL HILL, N. C, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1, 1925
NUMBER 46
JEFF FORDHAM GETS NOMINATION
FOR PRESIDENCY STUDENT BODY
IN CHAPEL WITHOUT OPPOSITION
ttl
HIGH SCHOOLS TO
CLASH HERE FOR
THEAYCOCKCUP
250 High Schools Took Part In
State-Wide Triangular De
bate Held Last Friday.
TAKE HILL NEXT WEEK
WEIL LECTURES
BY WHITE WILL
BEGIN ON FRIDAY
Annual ' Series of Lectures to
Be Delivered by Kansas
Newspaper Editor.
FINAL LECTURE SUNDAY
DI MINSTREL-REVUE TONIGHT AND
THURSDAY MOST ELABORATE SHOW
EVER PRODUCED AT CHAPEL HILL
Majority of Nominees Without
Opponents.
WATT SENIOR PRESIDENT
Treasurershipof Y. M. C. A.
Only Chance Upperclassmen
Have to Exercise Vote.
FRESHMEN HAYING HOT FIGHT
Jeff Fordham Will Make Speech In
Chapel Thursday Morning Despite
Scarcity of Opposition.
Nominations for student body officials
were held in Memorial hall last Tuesday
at chapel period and resulted in the fol
lowing choices! For president of the stu
dcnt body, J. B. Fordham; for members
of the Publications Union, J. H. Line
berger, Walter Crissman (has with
drawn), Whislow Mclver, W. D. Toy,
and Horace Strickland (has withdrawn) ;
for editor of the Tar Heel, L. A. Crow
ell (has withdrawn) and H. N. Parker j
for editor of the Carolina Magazine. W.
T. Couch ; . for editor of the Tactety
Tack, A. C Summerville; for president
of the Y, M. C A., Emmett Underwood;
for vice-president, Walter Crissman; for
secretary, Lee Kennett; for treasurer,
Frazier Glenn and E. A. Farrel; for
president of the Athletic association,
Bill Devin, C. R. Jonas (has withdrawn)
and Herman Mclver (has withdrawn) ;
for vice-president, Charles Thomas and
George Sparrow (has withdrawn; for
representative-at-large, W. A. Dodderer;
for members of the debate council, J. R.
Owens (reported not registered and
therefore ineligible), M. M. Young, T.
E. Clemmons (has withdrawn), C R.
Jonas, It. L. (Speedy) Cook, Howard
Godwin and S,' G. Chappell (has with
drawn). The election of the officers for the ris
ing senior class was held in 111 Mur
phy hall and resulted in the nomination
of L. E. Watt for president, Zack Waters
for vice-president, and J. B. Wahman
for secretary and treasurer.
The rising juniors met in 206 Phillips
"hall and nominated R. L. Sides for pres
ident, Tom Pearsall for vice-president,
T. E. Clemmons for treasurer and Jim
Van Ness for secretary.
Gerrard hall was the meeting place for
the rising sophomores, who nominated
Manly Williams and Jack Davis for
president, Joe Bobbitt, Walter Kelly and
"Mutt" Evans for vice-president, Carl
Purser and George Busby for secretary,
and B. K. Manning for treasurer.
Although there will be no contest for
the office of president of the student
bodyj ' Jeff Fordham, the nominee, has
consented to say a few words in chapel
Thursday morning before the voting be
gins, Chapel period. Thursday will be ex
tended until 11:30, at which time the 11
o'clock classes will begin. This is to
give the students a chance to do their
voting at this time and start the count
ing as soon as possible. '
(Continued on page four)
WHITE TO SPEAK
BEFORE ASSEMBLY
Social Science Research Insti
tute Meets Here.
0 N APRIL 3 AN D 4
Many Prominent Educators Will At
tend Convention.
Plans for the annual meeting of the
Southern Science Teachers, which will
meet here at the Carolina Inn on Friday
and Saturday, April 3 and 4, have re
cently been, completed by the Institute
for Research in Social Science. The con
vention comes here at the joint Invi
tation of the Institute and the University
Extension Division. . '
One of the most important features of
the meeting will be the series of address
es by William Allen White, who will be
here at the same time" to deliver the an
nual Weil lectures. Mr. White will be
a special guest of the conference at a
dinner on Friday evening. Other speak
ers will be President Chase and Josephus
Daniels.
The conference will be given over most
ly to general discussions of definite re
search programs for the South. The
delegates will attend an actual seminar
where graduate students will report on
projects that are how being carried on.
Various smokers, dinners, and luncheons
will also be given the delegates.
A large number of the South's most
famous educators have indicated that
they will attend the conference. Among
these are Deans S. O. Mitchell, of the
University of Richmond, Bigood, of the
University of Alabama, and Bristol, of
the University of Florida, and others.
STUDENT BODY BALLOT
President of Student Body
J. B. FORDHAM
i .
Members of the Publications
I Union (3 to be elected)
7 J. H. LINEBERGER
WINSLOW M'lVEAR
- W. D. TOY
For Editor of the TAR HEEL
H. N. PARKER
For Editor of the Carolina
')':' Magazine
W. T. COUCH
For Editor of the Yackety Yack
A. C. SUMMERVILLE
Y. M. C. A. Officials
President
EMMETT UNDERWOOD
Vice-President
WALTER CRISSMAN
Secretary
LEE KENNETT
Treasurer
FRAZIER GLENN
E. A. FARREL
Athletic Association
President
BILLY DEVIN
Vice-President
CHARLES THOMAS
Representative-at-Large
BILL DODDERER
Members of the Debate Council
(4 to be elected)
M. M. YOUNG
C. R. JONAS
' R. L. (SPEEDY) COOK
HOWARD GODWIN
Officers of the Rising Senior
Class
President
L. E. WATT
Vice-President
ZACK WATERS
Secretary and Treasurer
J. B. WAHMAN
Officers of the1 Rising Junior
Class
President
R. L. SIDES
' i
Vice-President
TOM PEARSALL
Secretary
T. E. CLEMMOS
Treasurer
JIM VAN NESS
Officers of the Rising Sopho
more Class
President
MANLY WILLIAMSON
JACK DAVIS
Vice-President
JOE BOBBITT
WALTER KELLEY
"MUTT" EVANS
Secretary
CARL PURSER
GEORGE BUSBY
Treasurer
B. K. MANNING
Lipman's Windows
Show New Styles
In an advertisement of Jack Lipman's
which appears in this issue of the Tab
Heei. it is annarent that Easter and
spring are near at hand and that Chapel
Hill's latest clothing firm is preparing
to meet a heavy demand for the latest
styles. The show windows, which are
conveniently close to the Pick, are always
full of the latest styles, and give the
passing students a key to'tlie--"latest"
and show what Lipman has in stock for
immediate demand.
The (traduate school continues to grow,
the registration at present being 366, the
largest number ever registered. Ihe
growth is shown by comparing the cur
rent matriculation with that of the past
two years, of 339 and 274.
The honor system of the University of
Wisconsin provides that all faculty mem
bers shall leave the room during exami
nations. Two instructors have been re
ferred to the faculty hy the senior coun
cil because they did not observe this ride.
Track Meet and Tennis Match Big
Part of Annpal High School Week
Conducted by University.
The 13th annual high' school debates
took place last Friday night in various
towns throughout the state. About 1,000
debaters from about 250 high schools
took part in the triangular contests,
speaking on the query, Resolved That
Nortti Carolina should ratify the Port
Terminals and Water Transportation
Act. '. '
The high schools which won both of
their triangular debates will send their
teams to the University on April 9 and
10 to take part In the final contest of
the High School Debating Union for the
Aycock memorial cup. This final contest
will be a feature of High School Week
at the University, the other features of
this occasion being the 10th annual inter
scholastic tennis tournament and the
13th annual inter-scholastic track meet
for the North Carolina schools.
The winners of the triangles reported
thus far are as follows: Canton, Aurelian
Springs, Biltmore, Altamahaw, Ossipee,
Carthage, Chapel Hill, Creedmoor, Dur
ham, Eagle Springs, Elm City, Glen Al
pine, Glenwood, Grifton, Guilford, Hen
derson Hertford, Huntersville won by
forfeiture, Kings Mountain, Lexington,
Liberty, Marshville, Mocksville, More
head City, North Brook, Old Town,
Pleasant Garden, Reidsville, St, Pauls,
Scotland Neck, Siler City, Snow Hill,
Spring Hope, Sylva, Troy, Winecroff,
Winston-Salem, Woodland, Yadkinville,
Manteo, Kenly, Monroe Road, Pinnacle,
Rocky Mount, Shelby, Fruitland, Falcon,
and Canton.
QUEEN OF MAY TO
JPM CAMPOS
Carnival Beauty Will Be Roy
ally Feted.
CAROLINA CARNIVAL
Nominations for Beauty Queen Now
Being Made.
On May 15 some lucky girl will reign
supreme at Chapel Hill, escorted by a
happy Carolina student, and royally sup
ported by a train Of the nine prettiest
girls in the state and their student es
corts. . ,
In a stupendous pageant of color, a
riot of glamor and glitter, that lucky
girl will be crowned queen of Carolina's
Carnival, and the dignity and import
ance of the affair will be seen when the
governor of the state walks out with
his retinue to officiate at the beautiful
coronation ceremony.
On an enormous platform, smothered
with flowers and bedecked with gaily
colored banners, that state beauty will
be crowned as the May queen, to be
come ruler of the students' hearts and
the Carolina Carnival.
'At the baseball game that afternoon
there will be constructed for this First
Lady of the Hill and the gubernatorial
party, a gorgeously decorated box in the
center of the grandstand.
The queen, will be rtyally dined at the
Carolina Inn at 6 that afternoon. The
Lavender and Gold Room will be in spe
cial readiness for Her Highness and
party.
At the big Carnival Ball at the "Fetzer
Coliseum" the festivities will entirely re
volve around this newly-crowned regal
beauty, and throughout it all, some lucky
Carolina ball will be her escort and know
that he nominated her for this honor, and
that his girl is the center of such attrac
tion and the cynosure of such ovation.
Any man in the student body may, not
later than April 20th, put up the name
ofjis sweetheart or girl friend. In pre
senting her name' he must turn in her
picture, her address, the school or col
lege she attended, and her age. She
must be a resident of North Carolina.
When nominations close, a committee of
six Chapel Hill ladles will select from
this bunch of beauty 20 girls whom they
consider the prettiest and best represen
tative of the "Ideal Carolina Girl."
These 20 pictures will be arranged in
a "Queens' Gallery" and prominently
displayed on the campus for a week, as
well as being syndicated In the state
newspapers. After a week's display, a
primary election will be held, the whole
campus voting, to decide the 10 prettiest
girls.
A final election, a week later, will de
cide the Queen of the Carnival, the nine
remaining beauties to be her maids of
honor. ' '
Is Novelist, Biographer, Editor, Pub
lisher and Politician and Exerts
Powerful Nation-Wide Influence.
The Weil lectures this year, which are
to be delivered by William Allen White
on April 3, 4 and 5, will probably be the
most significant series since the estab
lishment of the foundation in 1914. Mr.
White is preeminently fitted for the dis
cussion of American citizenship, as he
has been engaged in national politics for
over 30 years and has a remarkably com
prehensive conception of the' American
people and their civic and social life.
William Allen White is one of the
most popular writers in the journalistic
field today. He is a novelist, a biogra
pher, an editor, a publisher, and a poli
tician. His influence has been felt all
over the' states in the national elections.
He has stirred the nation with his fights
for freedom of speech and against the
Ku Klux Klan. He has written editorials
that have started the people thinking
and kept them thinking.
Mr. White first attracted national at
tention through an editorial, "What's the
Matter With Kansas?" written August,
1896, in the midst of the McKinley-Bry-an
campaign. It was reprinted in nearly
every Republican newspaper In the Unit
ed States, and Mark Hanna, chairman
of the Republican National committee,
said he used the editorial more widely
than any other campaign document in
the campaign. The editorial represents
conservatism in its full and perfect flow
er. Since this time he has maintained
his position as a national factor and has
. ( Continued on page four) " .
JUNIOR CLASSTO
CLEAN UP CAMPUS
Will Have Charge of Annual
-'Clean Up Week.
FORDHAM WILL SPEAK
Dances and Convention Makes Clean
Campus Desirable.
In an effort to improve the appearance
if the campus, the junior class will launch
its annual clean-up campaign beginning
next week. Jeff B. 'Fordham, president
of the junior class and nominee for the
presidency of the student body, will
speak in chapel this week and fully ex
plain the purpose of the movement.
Next week is the last before the Easter
holidays, and it is desired that the cam
pus be in its best condition during the
Easter dances which begin on Tuesday,
April 14. Following the holidays, the
national convention of Deans and Advis
ee ers of Men gather here and visitors will
come to the Hill from all parts of the
country. :, The 'convention is scheduled at
a time when the campus is at its height
In beauty and the University especially
desires that the' students co-operate in
making the campus look as beautiful as
possible.
The chief aims of the clean-up week
is to put an end to the throwing of paper
and other trash from dormitory windows
and to insist upon students following
the walks instead of cutting across the
grass.
It is probable that a janitor's contest
similar to the one used last year will be
inaugurated again this spring. Lastear
several prizes were offered to the jani
tors keeping their dormitory in the most
sanitary condition. The contest was re
garded as a thorough success and it may
be resorted to again this year in order
to put the campus in the best possible
condition. . ,
Bernard Speaks
In Chapel Tuesday
"Gutzon Borglum is one of the ten
great sculptors in the world," stated Dr.
W. S. Bernard in chapel Tuesday morn
ing when he urged all freshmen to at
tend the Borglum lectures last night and
to bring a contribution with them.
Dr. Bernard deplored the treatment
accorded the Confederate veterans In the
South and added that a contribution
would be taken up at the lecture for the
old soldiers of X)range county. The mag
nificence of the memorial undertaken by
the famous sculptor was also, interesting
ly told, and the recent controversy in
Atlanta briefly touched upon by the pro
fessor. ' '..'''
An inter-fraternity bridge tournament
is taking place between the various Greek
letter fraternities 'at the University of
Chicago. At the present writing over
SO games have been held.
Amphoterothen Urges
Student Body to Vote. -
Ludlow T. Rogers will speak in chapel
this morning urging the freshmen to ex
ercise its right to vote in the general
student body and class elections tomor
row morning. Rogers is speaking in be
half of Amphoterothen, a campus organ
ization devoted to the interests of prob
lems of citizenship and government. The
order is lending its endorsement to the
idea that students should vote in the
elections.
BIG CAMPUS-WIDE
MEET A SUCCESS
Williams, of Old East, High
Point Scorer.
GIERSCH IS SECOND
Ruffin First In Dormitory Standing by
Half Point.
The first annual All-University field
day proved a great success. Eighty-five
men participated, and nine dormitories
and three fraternities were represented
in the meet. f
Ruffin dormitory won first place in the
meet, winning out over West with a half
point margin, 45 Va to 45. Old East was
third with 24 points, and Zeta Psi frater
nity fourth with 16.
Z. M. Williams of Old East was high
point scorer with 12 points. He won
first place in the javelin, second in the
shot-put, and third in the discus. Giersch,
of Ruffin, was second with 9 points. He
placed first in . the 120-yd. low hurdles
and second in the running broad jump.
Williams was awarded a silver loving
cup given by the Grail.
The feature event of the meet was the
four-man quarter mile relay. A silver
loving cup was awarded- the winning
team by the Grail, and this caused com
petition to run high. West won this event
and Iiuflin was second.
Results of meet:
100-yd. dash McPherson, Zeta Psi,
first j Edmundson, Phi Delta Theta, sec
ond; Laney, West, third. Time, 101-5
sec.
220-yd. dash Edwards, "F," first; Ed
mundson, Phi Delta Theta, second j T. M.
Goodwin, Ruffin, third. Time, 21 2-5 sec.
120-yd. low hurdles Giersch, Ruffin,
first; Johnston, Zeta Psi, second; Flor
ence, West, third. Time, 16 3-5 sec.
440-yd. run Hackney Old East, first;
Wilkins, Ruffin, second; Garmise, West,
third. Time, 55 1-5 sec. ,
880-yd. run Rhinehart, West, first;
Henley, "F," second; R. H. Davis, Ruffin,
third. Time, 2 min. 10 2-5 sec.
Mile run Elliott, New Dorms, first;
Daniels, "J," second; Buchanan, Ruffin,
third. Time, 4 min. 52 sec.
Shot put Jenkins, "J," first; Williams,
East, second; Newcombe, West, third.
Distance, 37 ft. 3 in.
Discus Newcombe, West, first; Lock
hart, West, second; Williams, East, third.
Distance, 111 ft..5 in.
Javelin Williams, East, first; Gresh
am, Phi Delta Theta, second; 'McDaniel,
Mangutn, third. Distance, 127 ft.
High jump Pearson, Ruffin, first;
Lipscomb, Kappa Alpha, second; Gresh-
am, Phi Delta Theta, third. Height, 5 ft.
5 in.
Broad jump Woodard, ' Kappa Al
pha, first; Giersch, Ruffin, second; Mc
Pherson, Zeta Psi, third. Distance, 20
Ht. 1 in.
Pole vault Corbett, West, first; Mc-
Fayden of Steele and Sehiltz of Ruffin
tied for second. Height, 9 ft. 9 in.
8-man relay (each man running 220
yds.) Ruffin, first; West, second; New
Dorms, third.
4-man relay (each man running 110
yds.) West, first; Ruffin, second; East,
third.
High point men: Williams, East, 12;
Ghysch, Ruffin, 9; McPherson, Zeta Psi,
8; Ewmundson, Phi Delta Theta, 8; Jen
kins, "J," 7.
High point teams: Ruffin, 45;, West,
45; East, 24; Zeta Psi, 16.
Officials: Referee, Dr. Lawrence; start
er, Coach Bob Fetzer; chief field Judge,
C. C. Poindexter; chief track judge, W.
E. Caldwell; clerk of course, S. B.
'league. Inspector's, C. C. Fordham, J.
B. Fordham, Dale Ranson, Freeman
Grant, F. S. Griffin, C. L. Wyrick.
A professor at the University of Wis
consin encourages the members of his
class to send him anonymous letters criti
cizing him and his methods of teaching.
Here is one professor who has departed
from the orthodox methods of an in
structor. Dr. W. S. Bernard gave an illustrated
lecture In Elizabethtown on March 25
on "Masterpieces of the Great Painters."
Public , Performance
To-
night At 8:30
MEN COMPOSE CAST
66
Six Man Harp Team Will Ren
der Popular and Classical
Music As Feature.
WILL STAGE BIG RADIUM SCENE
Revue Opens With a Beautiful Rose
Garden Take-Off On Carolina
Playmakers in Second Act.
Well, boys, tonight's the night. Caro
lina's biggest show is here.
The Di Minstrel-Revue will be gjyen
tonight and tomorrow night In Memorial
hall at 8:30 p.m., and will be the first
combination show givenhere. For weeks
the huge company of 66 has bcein tolling
every night, and tonight 'will see the
results of their stupendous undertaking.
More startling effects, more dazzling
scenery, more gorgeous costumes, more
original novelties,, and more unique spe
cialties will be seen in this show than
have ever been attempted here before.
There will be seven complete changes of
scenery and costumes. ' There are approx
imately 90 costumes used in this produc
tion and the scenery is said to be valued
at about $4,000.,;
The first act is a beautiful rose garden,
scene in which over 35 people figure.
Twenty black-faces are seen, including
three "hlgh'-brown mamas." This act is
crammed full of songs, jokes, drills, bal
lads, ' lighting effects, specialties, etc.
Some very efficient critics have reviewed
the dress rehearsals and say that this
act, as well as the entire show, is nearer
the professional smoothness and profes
sional atmosphere than any amateur show
they ever saw.
The second act is made up of six "Big
Time" specialties. The first one is a
screaming 15-minute "take-off" on the
Carolina Playmakers, written by Kike
Kyser. The parts in this skit are taken
by all the "old-timers" in the Pluymaker
organization. All the Jimss of the skit
and the plot are mude by using the names
of all the pluys presented by the Play
mukers. The' names are listed below and
if you will read them and familiarize
yourself with them, the skit will be en
joyed much more. The names arc: Mama,
Agatha, The Lord's Will, Gaius and Gal
us, Jr., Peggy, Tristu, Dogwood Bushes,
The Younger, The Vamp, Chatham Rab
bit, Waffles for Breakfast, The Black
Rooster, In Dixon's Kitchen, Wilbur's
Cousin, The Berry Pickers, The Miser,
The Beaded Buckle, Politicin' in Horse
Cove, The Wheel, Fixin's, Blackbeard,
Pirate of the Carolina Coast, Nat Ma
con's Game, The Old Men of Edenton,
The Last of the Lowrics, The Third
Night, The Return of Buck Gavin, Dod
Gast Ye Both, When Witches Ride, The
Hag, Wrack P'int, Off Nag's Head, The
Fighting Corporal, What Will Barbara
Say, The Honor of Bonava, Reward Of
fered, Who Pays the Reaping, Scuffle
town Outluws.
(Continued on page four)
DEBATER'S DEFEAT
WEST VIRGINIANS
Tar Heels Get 2-1 Decision Over
Mountaineers.
HAD. STRONG OPPONENT
Jonas, .Chappell and Justus Composed
Carolina Team.
Carolina's negative debating team de
feated West Virginia University by a
two-to-one decision of the judges in the
annual dual debate between the two in
stitutions, held Monday night in Mor-
gantown, W. Va., according to a telc
graia received by M. M. Young, secretary-treasurer
of the debate council.
The query was, Resolved That Con
gress by a two-thirds vote shall be em
powered to override decisions of the
Supreme court declaring Congressional
acts unconstitutional. The Tar Heels
were represented by Charles R. Jonas,
Sidney G.' Chappell and Ernest L. Jus
tus. West Virginia; defending the af
firmative, was represented by Hugo F.
Blumenburg, Robert T. Donley and Har
ry I Snyder, Jr.
Carolina debating adherents consider
this victory to be a fitting climax to the
Tar Heel record of victories so far this
year. Carolina has won all four of its
contest debates, having defeated South
Carolina, William and Mary, Kentucky,
and West Virginia. The West Virginia
victory is considered especially brilliant,
in as much as the Mountaineer debating
team had but recently taken a tour to
the Pacific coast, covering 20 states, and
debating 10 Universities on this same
question. They defended both sides of
the query.
(Continued on page four)
First
    

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