North Carolina Newspapers

    Page Two
THE TAR HEEL
Tuesday, November 2, 192s
Leading Southern College Tri
weekly Newspaper
Member of North Carolina Collegiate
Press Association
Published three times every week of
the college year, and is the official
newsDaper of the Publications Un
ion of the University of North Caro
lina, Chapel Hill, N. C. Subscrip
tion price, $2.00 local and $3.00 out
of town, for the. college year.
Offices in the basement of Alumni
-Building. Telephone 403. . ,
J. T. MadbyIj! ... Editor
F. F. Simon..... .Business Manager
Editorial Department
, Managing Editors
J. P. Ashby . ..Tuesday Issue
Byron White.'. : .Thursday Issue
L. H. McPherson Saturday Issue
D. D. Carroll.
..Assistant Editor
3, K. Bobbitt, 3x.Assignment Editor
.. Staff
J. H. Anderson W. P. Perry
J. M. Block J. P. Pretlow
J. E. Coggihs ! TVM. Reece ,
. Walter Creech D. T. Seiwell
J. R. DeJournette S. B. Shephard, Jr.
" E. J. Evans J. Shohan
D. S. Gardner. F. L. Smith
Glen P. Holder W. S.- Spearman
T. W. Johnson W. H. Strickland
W. E. Kindley, Jr. Wm. H. Windley
Alex Mendenhall H. A. Wood
H. L. Merritt J. O. Marshall
Business Department
W. W. Neal. Jr. .Asst. to Bus. Mar,
W. M. Thomaa.j.. Collection Mgr.
G. W. Ray. .. Accountant
, Managers of Issues .
Tuesday Issue.....::..M. E. Block
Thursday issue. ..James Styles
Saturday Issue....- Worth Eby
. Advertising Department
Kenneth R 3 ones.!..L Advertising Mgr.
M. WV Breman....i..L.:...Loca;I AdvyMgr,
L Edward Smith......Mational Adv. Mgr.
.William K. Wiley Beh Schwartz
Charles Brown - " . RJ Hill
" G. W Bradham , Harry; Schwartz
: Circulation Department - -Henry
C. Harper Circulation Mgr.
R. C. Mulder... JFUer of Issues
C. W. Colwell - Tom Raney
. Douglas Boyce W. W. Turner
You can purchase any article adver
tised in the THE TAR HEEL with
perfect Safety because everything
it advertises is guaranteed to be
as represented. The TAR Heel so
licits advertising from reputable
concerns only. f, : . ' t -;
Entered- as second-class mail matter
at the Post Office, Chapel Hill, N. C
Tuesday, November 2, ,1 926
PARAGRAPHICS
Co-ed Cora says people used to
worry about the freedom, of the
seas. Now they worry about
the freedom of the knees.
Freshman Fritz says the' Med
professors will never be able to
tell how many bones there are
in the human body as long as the
people eat fish. . .-, : .;.
The latest addition to the
athletic department of the Uni
versity of Minnesota is a golf
course. It is to be paid for from
athletic receipts. Auburn is
making an attempt to get a
course, too. It is a shame the
way students go back to the
home-town wearing golf outfits
and deceive the people into be
lieving that they are golf enthu
siasts. .
per to telling the readers about consider; them, and turn out a
it. fair and unbiased opinion on
,..',,,',,'. I return."- '
Hell, figurative or, otherwise, Frederick O. Howe has said
is necessary for man as a "cuss" "The five years at college-had
word if for no other reason, been very nearly barren for me
Nicholas Murry Butler, president The inflexible pattern of Amer
of Columbia University,. recently ican collegiate life left almost
said m introducing .the Lord no impress on my mind. It had
Bishop of London, to the Pil- neither variety no inspiration;
gnms' bociety m New York, jt stimulated neither revery nor
"If there beno Hell, what is to inquiry. What was offered was
happen td the vocabulary of a not What i wanted.' College ere-'
man of high temper and careless ated no strength within me with
speech who wishes to express which to face he world."
nimseii witn vigorous complete- And now we turn to our iast
ness and no uncertain emphasis? reference. Glenn Frank, young
b or myself I should particularly brilliant educator and journal-
deplore the loss of Hell
the Hell do we care?
:-; y :X. . i', ,,, , ''',
What
THE SURVEY
l he. TAR heel has begun a
survey of the nine schools and
one college in the University.
This is to. introduce these dif
ferent divisions of the Univer
sity and at the same time to either of two dangersthe dan-
try of pick out; the foibles and ger of suicidal smattering or
virtues of each one. . Many stu- the danger of suicidal special-
dents hold false opinions about ization. The challenge of edu-
different schools and the one col- cation is to devise wavs and
ist, in approaching the task of
making university graduates
something more than specialists
in circumscribed fields, or store
houses of purposeless learning,
said: "Mass education has pro
duced new problems in univer
sity education.- The student in
the average institution is today1
in danger of falling victim to
lege." For instance, the School
of Commerce is often thought of
by outsiders as a part of Saun
ders Hall in which students do I
their work on adding machines,
and the College of Liberal Arts
as being scattered all over the
means of insuring to students
both the advantages of broad
cultural background and the ad
vantages of intensive special!
zatiori later." ' '
So we ask tne questions, does
the School of Commerce cause
University and giving a. smat- BT1Pi7a;ftri?. AnPth
riiig oiiear,uiig ,U every unng College of Liberal Arts cause
auu -a uioruugu Kiiowieuge oi suicidaJ smattering?; is three
nothing.
years in the Pharmacy School
that are to
Colleges and Universities in justifiable?: does the School of
general are being1, attacked as Education train only teachers?;
being places for attracting, does the School of Public Wei
boarding, and amusing the ad- f are Drw its students Into con
descent in which, .athletics have UoW wii, .,, oi Wini rh.
enttreiy suDorainatea the ac- iem?; does the ' Engineering
quisixion. oi Knowledge, otu- School impart culture?, et ceU
dents jget the superiority com- era. , We hope to answer some
plex" instilled in them by being of thse questions in feature sto-
constantly told . tnat they are
going to be leaders . in their
chosen field -that .the .world is
going to look to them "for lead
ership."
"Business executives work
ong and hard for their advanc
es. College youth going into
business expects immediately to
jump into an executive's chair,
or at least to do so in a year
or twa He is always forward
with .his plans and schemes tell
ries and editorials
follow.
COLLEGE CONFERENCE .
MEETS THIS MONTH
Dean Walker, Secretary, Gives Notice
of Meeting at Durham Last of
: Month Trabue on Program
Thomas . Jefferson considered
newspapers a necessary engine
of democracy. "If left to me
he once wrote, "to decide wheth
er we should have a government
without newspapers, or newspa
pers without a government, '
should not hesitate for a moment
to prefer the latter." There
isn't a scintilla of evidence to
confute his stout contention that
he believed in the papers.
We get about all the' mail we
want such as it is. Letters,
circulars, pamphlets, .magazines,
papers, and all kinds of printed
matter come .in great volumes
Everybody wants a little space,
We recently received ,a long let
ter from the National Associa
tion of Audubon Societies in New
York telling us about "the ever
increasing interest in bird-study
and bird protection. . ." 1 And
they, wanted us to devote three
fourths of a column of the. pa-
,Dr. W. L. Poteat, President of
the North Carolina College Con
ing the business men where they ference, has authorized- . N. W,
are allf wrong, how they could Walker, Secretary of the Con-
run ,their business better, why ference and Dean of the Educa-
they .are failing, etc. The col- tion School here, to send out the
ege man is used to having pro- following notice to the members
fessors to lead and guide him; concerning the coming meeting
he has had marks and grades that will be held at the Wash-
as something definite to attain; ington Duke Hotel, Durham,
he has had everything fixed up Tuesday and ; Wednesday, Nov-
for his every comfort and need, ember 23 and 24 :
When he goes into business life The first of the three sessions
he finds nothing definite to at- will be devoted, in the main, to
tain his god of marks has van: the report of the Committee on
ished; he finds business organ- the Examination of High School
ized without, regard for. him or
his college spirit and customs.
Instead of going to college, H.
Wells believes that "as early
as ntteen or sixteen, a youth
should be brought into contact
with realities and kept in con
tact with realities v from that
RELIGIOUS DISCUSSION ,
' ' NUMBER 5
" . - .. i
Disarmament and National St"
'iA ' curity ' -
Fpr .Wednesday Night, Nov. 3
"Nations shall not lift up sword
; against nation neither shall
there be war any more." :
1. What would be the result
if the United States should com
pletely disarm at one time? .,
2. Does military preparedness
tend more to provoke wars or
to maintain peace?
3. If all the money spent on
military training and prepared
ness' were spent in Educational
and religious; work would it be
effective in maintaining Nation
al peace? . '
4. Do. you . believe in con
scription oi wealth as well as
men in time of war?
5.,: Can we justify war un
der the teachings of Jesus ? .
ALUMNUS BROADCASTS
OVER RADIO MONDAY
Preston H. Epps, former stu
dent and director of the Glee
Club here, , broadcasted last
evening at 6:00 P. M. for Star
tion WBS, Atlanta, Ga.
Mi. frEpps received his A. B.
and M.; A. degree from the Uni
versity in 1915 and 1916. He is
now in charge of the Boy's 'High
School at Atlanta. -
economics and commerce cours
es are required of him. . Inves
tigation reveals that under the
system of majors and electives
a "student in the College of Lib
eral Arts can be more narrow in
his education than it is possi
ble for a graduate of the School
of Commerce to be.
A question often demanded of
the Commerce School is "Does it
prepare a man sufficiently for
a business life?" Dean Carroll's
answer is this : . .. . ' Y
"The School of Commerce of
the University of North Caro
lina does not endeavor to train
a man in the technique of any
business, for mere technique is
only temporary and superficial.
The courses of , this school are
for ,the purpose of enabling a
man to understand the funda
mental principles and forces un
derlying all business. Thus train
ed in the fundamentals of the
business world, the student will
understand the basic , principles
and if endowed with force of
character will be competent to
School of Commerce Graduates .
Given Cultural Background
Seniors. This report will be pre
sented by Dr. J. A. Highsmith
and Dr. M. R. Trabue. The, re
port will be discussed by several
members of the Conference.
At the third session, Wednes
day morning, the following sub
jects will be 'considered: "The
age on. That does not mean oeciiomng oi r resnmen Classes
that he will . make an end of by Dr. D. B. Bryan ; "The Ad-
learning then, but only v that ministration of Fraternities for
henceforth he will go on learn- Scholarship- and Discipline" by
ing and continue learning for Dean W. H. Wannamaker. Fol
the rest of his life-in relation lowing the presentation and dis-
not to the subject of a curricu- cussion of those two" problems
lum, but to the" realities he is will come the business meeting,
attacking." The Conference will adjourn a
The Gamecock savs "where bout 12:00 or 12:30
many, and evidently, Mr. Wells
among them, make the mistake
is, that they expect that a col
lege education will convert a
man into a genius, a financial
wizard, an authority upon ev
erything that he may undertake,
However" no-good and incapable
one might be before entering an
educational institution, at the
end of four years that one is
capable of taking the affairs of
the world upon his shoulders.
Of course this is not true. It
is no more true than that all the
vx "ivij wuiu T 1 ,r t mil i vn
be Dlaced hpforo Mr WoTIa or,A lm ""AiV ItTJJiAiN
. - w ""Ml xv 1 Tnttrmnnm. w.n
his irreat mind wnnM rofnllv i SI1UI'
. vWiv; I iCltHflttrrrrfllfriflMirirfirfllfirfliiifiiririiiiriiitiiTfrMiitttrrtiitiiiffriiiritffttittiTfafiittii
" iimmimim iMdiiHiiiiiiiHiiiiilllillllHIiimUNIIIIlllllHII
YACKETY YACK
PROOFS READY
' Yackety Yack proofs, are
at the Y today and tomor
row. Be sure and call by
to decide which you wish to
be used in the Annual.
NEW .
KNICKERS
(Continued from page one)
as a whole. Only in . the senior
year is the work .specialized ac
cording to the course the stu
dent wishes to pursue.
The djvisipns of the School
of Commerce in the senior year
are : (1) a actory Organization
and Administration, (2) Bank
ing and Finance, (3) Marketing
and Merchandising, (4) Adver
tising and Salesmanship, (5)
Personnel Management, (6)
Risk-Bearing and Insurance, (7)
Transportation and Shipping,
(8) Business Law, (9) Accoun
ancy, (10) Foreign Trade, and
Consular Service, (11) Munici
pal Administration, (12) Com
mercial Teaching.
Those who think that a com
merce student receives none of
the so-called cultural subjects
should inform themselves of the
true state of affairs. Of the
thirty-seven courses which
commerce student must, pass,
fcwentyrsix of them are accred
ited A. B. courses. The com
merce student is required to take
four, courses of. English while
the A. B- student has only three
required. The commerce stu
dent must take four courses in
one modern language while the
A., B. student is required to take
only three in each of two lan
guages. - in tact, a student m
the Commerce School cannot fai
to receive -a well-rounded educa
tion because cultural as well as
in
McGregor and Westminster
i Imported Golf Hose ,
Pair of Glasses Lost in the
Stadium Saturday. Tortoise
Shell in tan , case. Dr. Louis,
Wright, & Hicks written on case
Return to TAR HEEL office and
receive reward. !
Combination Wool and .
Leather Lumber Jackets 1
at
JACK LIPMAN'S
UNIVERSITY SHOP
Chapel Hill
furniture Co.
Formerly
Jake L. Welborn, Inc.
A special invitation is ex
tended to all!
Come look our stock over.
Anything not in stock will
be promptly ordered,
SAVING FROM 30 TO 40
JACK LIPMAN'S
UNIVERSITY SHOP
forge ahead and become a leader
in his field.. Not being a victim
of established technique, he will
know how to meet -the problems
that will face him and how to
plan improvements in our busi
ness life,"
The University ; School of
Commerce is the largest one in
the South; and indeed a general
survey indicates that there are
few of its type in - the country.
It is a member of the American
Association of Collegiate Schools
of Business, which association it
was invited to join rather than
expected to apply for member
KIhe largest selling
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Plain enda, per do. $1.00
Rubber endi, per doc tJO
cAfttitalm
American Lead Pencil Co.
220 Fifth Av.N.V. .
WE HAVE THAT
SELECT LINE
OF
Collegiate Seal
Stationery
AT LOWEST PRICES
SEE US BEFORE YOU BUY
The Book Exchange
rue ccomes, hts
DE V EL bPED BY- FINCHLEY FOR.
COLLEGIAN USAGE FOR FALL
. WLL BE EXHIBITED BY A REP
RESENTA TIVE FROM NEW YORK
CAROLINA DRY CLEANERS
WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY
NOVEMBER 3RD & 4TH
Bill Hollenbeck, Rep.
PARTICULAR INTEREST IS IN
VITEQ TO THE EXTRAORDINARY
FABRICS OF FOREIGN SELECTION.
PATTERNS CONFINED SOLELY
TO THIS ESTABLISHMENT.
FORTYFIVE DOLLARS
- . . , - AND: MORE I
TAILORED TO MEASURE
THE
' .
FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK
    

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