North Carolina Newspapers

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The Daily Tar Heel Thursday, December 11. 1952
' The official student publication of the Publications Board of the University
of North Carolina. Chapel Hill, where it is published daily, except Monday,
examination and vacation periods, and during the official summer terms.
Entered as second class matter at the post office in Chapel Hill.'N. C, under
the act of March 3, 1879. Subscription rates mailed $4 per year, $1.50 per
quarter; delivered, $6 and $2.23 per quarter.
Editor
Managing Editor .
Business Manager
Sports Editor :
WALT DEAR
ROLFE NEILL
JIM SCHENCK
BIFF ROBERTS
News Ed Bob Slough
Sub Mgr .. Carolyn Reichard
Ass't. Sub Mgr Delaine Bradsher
Office Mgr. Buzzy Shull
Soc. Ed Deenie Schoeppe
Circ. Mgr. .'. Donald Hogg
Ass't. Spts. Ed Tom Peacock
Adv. Mgr Ned Beeker
Editorial Department Bev Baylor, Sue Burress, Nina Gray, Jane Carter, Joe
Raff.
News Staff Bob Slough, John Jamison. Punchy (Billy) Grimes, ILouis Kraar,
Jerry Reece, Tom Parramore, Alice Chapman, Dixon Wallace, Tony Burke,
Jennie Lynn, Tish Rodman, Tom Neal Jr., Jane Carter, Sally Schindel.
Sports Staff Vardy Buckarlevv. Paul Cheney, Melvin Lang, Everett Parker.
Charlie Dunn. -
Night Editor for this issue: Tom Peacock
Swapping The Book
Establishment of a book swap shop to give students a
better break on second hand book sales symbolizes dissatis
faction with the present Book-X system.
A $6 accounting book, after three month's use, nets $3.
Resentment to the present plan was pinpointed in an October
editorial: "The present policy of 'We don't need that one
sorry tough luck' aggravates everybody. . . . and" discrimi
nates against those students taking uncommon or 'off -brand'
courses such as country journalism, obscure political science
courses, Russian, and Portuguese."
The Visiting Committee of the Board of Trustees was con
fronted with the problem a few weeks ago when Al Bryant,
a student member of the Campus Stores Committee, asked
for more exchange value on books handled by the Book-X.
Bryant also asked that the 10 per cent rebate system be re
instated. In spite of the work done by the trustees to solve the
Book-X profits problem, and in spite of their efforts to work
out a fair program for all three parts of the Consolidated
University, we feel that the complaints on return books are
valid. Think of the courses which change books twice a year.
The students are left holding the books.
Bryant pointed out to the trustees that in four years time,
student who gets $300 a year on a Campus Stores grant-in-aid-spends
about $60 a year on books anyway. How many students
will get the scholarships? Profits expected from this year's
academic year's operation range from $30,000 to $40,000 ac
cording to Business Manager Teague. If the Book-X instituted
a program whereby students could get more money for their
used books, this trading post would be unnecessary.
The swap shop will stay open only as long as students
utilize it, and only as long as it is skillfully directed. Alpha
Phi Omega has taken on a difficult job. We wish the service
fraternity success.
In yesterday's front page story, two of the reasons listed
why the old store failed were: "Students wanted too much
for their used text books, and many of the books placed in
the'shop were old, and outdated."
The fact that this plan has actually worked in several other
universities successfully should be encouraging to APO.
The Road Tour
We didn't see "The Inspector General," the latest Play
maker production. We've heard enough comment about the
play, though, to be disappointed that this show has been
chosen for the annual Playmaker tour.
The Playmakers take to the road each year, performing
to various groups, but mostly high schools. We had hoped
that "Death of A Salesman" could have been presented, be
cause we feel even high school students could grasp and
appreciate some of the great human elements in the play,
the economic problems presented, and the outstanding per
formances by many in the cast.
Evidently, comedy wins out over tragedy for the secondary
school generation. That's unfortunate. It shows that high
school groups are shown the mediocre, instead of the best,
in this particular case.
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-HORIZONTAL
1. lake in
Africa
5. possessive
pronoun
8. ship's tiller
12. river in
France
13. goddess of
malicious
mischief
14. space
15. worthless
scraps
16. American
essayist
18. chirped
20. consumers
21. tier
22. crippled
23. malicious
26. slight
depression
30. foot-like
organ
31. values
33. river in
Scotland
34. Asiatic
bovine
ruminants
36. revolt .
38. fondles
40. small child
41. herb allied
to chicory
44. eagles' nests
47. cast a shadow
over
49. garden
flower
50. cry of
Bacchanals
51. before
52. grafted
(her.)
53. tidings
54. press with
insistence
55. French
Belgian river
VERTICAL
1. inclosure
for fowl
2. contract for
labor of
3. star
4. petty tyrant
5. obdurate
6: summer
(Ft.)
7. revoked
8. stopped
9. Great Lake
10. ly glance
11.
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Distributed by King Features Syndicate 43.
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a planet
knave of
clubs
pitcher
stringed
musical
instruments
scout
edible
green seed .
secured,
published
forms of
literary
works ,
new: comb,
form
decimal unit
location
young
mackerels
American
botanist
twilight
paradise
wheel hub
a cold mist
(Scot.)
gland:
comb, form
Italian
princely
house
prophet
silkworm
Louis Kraar
Party Line
Field Pack
Newspapers are not run by all
the people. They are mon
itored by strong, thoughtful
men who are looked to as
leaders.
These leaders have a respon
sibility to the millions of read
ers who look to them for news,
information, and interpretation
of complicated current events.
For many readers the pages of
newsprint are the only means
of education. They are in a
sense the textbook of the con
temporary scene.
A Negro newspaper, one with
many - readers, has distorted
truth and betrayed the trust of
the people. This isn't any sin,
according to tabloid editors and
proponents of yellow journal
ism. ' But others don't agree.
The Pittsburgh Courier "re
ported" on the recent State
Student Legislatur in Raleigh
by saying in a headline "Chapel
Hill Students Reflect Jim Crow
Pressures." The story that fol
lowed was a perfect example
of how not to write an un
biased newstory.
"The 'Jim-Crow' pressure of
the administration at the Uni
versity of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill has apparently
seeped through to intimidate
some of the school's white male
students," said the "account."
The rest of the story sang of
the same slanted prejudice in a
consistent off-key manner.
. Those who have watched
State Student Legislature know
that it has paved the way in
expressing students' liberal and
-7
democratic views, particularly
on the question of racial equal
ity. Leaders from colleges and
universities throughout the
state sat side by side in Ra
leigh last month. Some had lib
eral ideas. Others were more
conservative. Many students
wore blue suits, while others
preferred gray. And some had
black skin. Others had white.
It was just that casual. No
one said, "Look at us. Now
aren't we being liberal." But in
stead leaders worked side by
side in a way that personified
such glorious and much-used
phrases as the American way-of-life
and "all men are cre
ated equal."
Skip the flagwaving and look
at the State Student Legisla
ture. That's democracy in ac
tion. But one reporter betrayed his
trust and distorted the facts. It
is regretable.
Drew Pearson
The Washington Merry-Go-Round
WASHINGTON Inside rea
son why General Eisenhower
sent his apologies to the U. S.
troops which were kept stand
ing for inspection in the Korean
cold was because an overzealous
brass hat had ordered the men
to wear dress uniforms, not
winter uniforms.
Dress uniforms have no ear
flaps and, as- a result of waiting
tw"o hours and fifteen minutes in
bitter cold, a lot of ears and
noses were frozen.
Naturally when the troops
saw their visitors in nondress
uniforms with ear flaps, while
they wore dress uniforms, there
was resentment.
Eisenhower hit the ceiling
when he heard what had hap
pened, sent his apologies for
keeping the troops waiting.
Modest Uncle Omar When
Charles E. Wilson was up at the
front with ROK troops, he saw
them shooting tracer bullets in
to the side of a hill. "What are
those little red balls?" asked the
new Secretary of Defense, who
apparently has a lot to learn
about defense but is learning
the hard way. . . . Meeting his
son, Maj. John Eisenhower, in
Korea, Ike told him he cele
brated his election as president
by buying Mrs. John a new fur
coat. ... In Seoul, Ike slept in
General Van Fleet's own bed
room, while Van Fleet slept on
a cot in the laundry. Gen. Omar
Bradley slept in the guest room
which is on the street side. The
Secret Service didn't consider it
safe for Ike to sleep in a room
on the street, but .didn't seem
to mind what happened to Un
cle Omar. ... Uncle Omar, in
cidentally, got pushed around
more than any other VIP in the
party chiefly as a result of his
own modesty, partly because
some officers in Korea didn't
recognize him,. The unassuming
man from Moberly, Mo., usually
found himself looking over the
shoulders of photographers. . . .
Herb Brownell, the new Attor
ney General, left his clothes in
Seoul because of the hurried
getaway.
Ike's Security It was. Jim
Rowley, head of Ike's Secret
Service squad, who vetoed the
proposed parade through Seoul.
. . . Despite the fact that Presi
dent Rhee had arrested 20,000
people as security risks, Rowley
learned that the Communinsts
had smuggled about 200 agents
into the capital. So he decreed:
"No parade." . . . On the last
day of Ike's visit, Dr. Syngman
Rhee was frantic because Gen.
Eisenhower had not returned
Rhee's call. The President of
Korea had called on Ike, but
Ike had not called on him or
posed for a photo with him. So
Rhee kept sending the head of
the Korean Army to see Eisen
hower, urging that he call on
the Korean president. Finally
Ike did so, and, on his last day,
their pictures were published
sitting together. . . . Though
Rhee is strong with the Korean
people he is not so strong with
the politicians. For Ike to have
left without posing for a pic
ture would have meant loss of
face for the president of Korea.
Some people are still laugh
ing and some are still chewing
nails over Gringo politics at the
inauguration of the new Presi
dent of Mexico.
The hospitable Mexicans have
a habit of inviting all sorts of
people to their inauguration, re
gardless of government proto
col. Thus Gen. Alberto Salinas,
Mexican military attache, sent
a special plane for Gen. Harry
Vaughan, aide to the president,
for Gen. C. J. Mara, aide to
Vaughan, and Gen. Wallace
Graham, doctor to the Presi
dent. They weren't picked as
delegates by the State Depart
ment, but the Mexicans brought
them down anyway.
Likewise Mexico invited the
new Veep-elect, Senator Nixon.
However, Nixon was not an of
ficial delegate, so he telephoned
Assistant Secretary of State Ed
Miller, asking that he be offi
cially appointed.
On top of this, the new Secre
tary of State, John Foster
Dulles, also called Miller ask
ing that Nixon be appointed;
while Sen. Henry Cabot Lodge
called John Steelman at the
White House, saying that it
would be embarrassing to Nix
on if he were not an official
member of the U. S. delegation.
So Nixon was appointed.
However, arriving in Mexico,
Nixon proceeded to give the
American delegation, of which
he was by that time an official
member, a wide berth. He
snubbed Secretary of Agricul
ture Brannan, head of the dele-
Express Yourself
Editor: .
It certainly is a good thing
that the "swap shop' will open
Monday.: . 4
On Wednesday we both went
to Steele Dorm to retrieve what
ever money we could for various
books that had been previously
purchased there. We went know
' ing well that we .would receive
very little in return for the
amount that we had paid for
them at first.
We showed the man behind
the counter the books, and he
replied that they already had
more than enough of those books
in stock. Naturally, we didn't
feel too happy about the situa
tion. However, there was no oth
er recourse open to us but to
save the books which were now
useless to us. The books had
cost more than they were worth
in the first place, but we don't
intend to discard them now.
We write this letter in hope
that this new system of re-selling
books will be cooperated in
by all the students. We definite
ly, as college students, should
not be the victims of unfair
business practice.
Alan Burnham
Art Barbanell
Christmas Seals
Although the annual Christ
mas Seal Sale has done much
towards cutting the death rate
due to tuberculosis in the United
States, the road ahead is still
a long one. This year 40,000 more
people died from TB than died
from any other infectious dis-
gation, never phoned or even
spoke to him.
Finally Brannan, in turn, de
clined to stand in the same re
ceiving line at the American
Embassy with Nixon.
However, the Mexican gov
ernment gave Nixon four body
guards and he had a good time
seeing the sights.
The people who had the best
time of all, however, were the
Mexicans, watching the gringos
snub each other.
ease. Right here in North Caro
lina, 2,088 beds are currently
occupied by TB victims, and
hundreds of others are waiting
for space: many of these will
never ' recover because of the
wait.
Here on the campus, Alpha
Phi Omega has generously do
nated time and effort to the
distribution of Christmas Seals
to the student body. Out of ev
ery dollar received as a result
of this "effort, seventy -five cents
will be used locally, the re
mainder going to national and
state associations for research
and organization.
So please be generous. A dol
lar isn't much if you spend it
these days, but a dollar donated
can save a life.
Alyym NorJon
1
WHEN TESTS
ARE DONE
TEXTS' "
HELP PAY
CHRISTMAS
COSTS
TRADE 'EM IN
AT
THMMTIMAT1
205 E. Franklin St.
Open Evenings
The Ram
Sees
A bio-science teacher at Mich
igan State told his class that he
was disgusted because so few
of his students believed in fly
ing saucers. Then he reached
into a bag and started hurling
china plates across the lecture
room.
The girls at Texas State Col
lege for Women are still pulling
variations on the old gag of
selling the Brooklyn Bridge to
the uninitiated. A freshman
there proudly told a friend that
she had bought a ticket from a
senior guaranteeing her a ride
in the administration building
elevator.
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