North Carolina Newspapers

    v- library
Serlala Dept.
Box 870
Chapi Hill, ?z.
C.
27514
intramural Managers
all iUf WiU a meeti"g of
at inonmUr0aLmana2e knight
at 7.30 m 304 Woollen Gym.
Football Analysis
DTH Editor Wayne HurdeT
analyzes last week's football
loss to Virginia. See his column
on page 5.
76 Years Of Editorial Freedom
CHAPEL HILL. NORTH CAROLINA, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1968
Founded February 23, 18$3
Vet
erans
Ietramiuiral.
titr
AM
voiume 76, Number 48
PE
LL U J o
Ceremony
Protested::
The annual Veterans day
observance was held in Polk
Place Tuesday with
sign-carrying members of
anti-war protest groups quietly
looking on.
About 30 members of the
Southern Students Organizing
Committee (SSOC) and the '
Young Socialist Alliance (YSA)
marched in quietly during the
event which featured members
of the UNC ROTC units in a
flag lowering ceremony.
The observance was
attended by commanders of
both ROTC units along with
Consolidated University
President William Friday,
Chancellor Carlyle Sitterson,
Dean of Student Affairs C. O.
Cathey and Dean of Men James
O. Cansler.
The demonstration
organized by former
students now working
SSOC, Scott Bradley
was
UNC
with
and
ueorge Vlasits.
Tim Knowlton, a five-year
veteran of the Marine Corps
formerly enrolled in the ROTC
program at UNC, was among
the demonstrators.
As chaplain, Dean Cansler
opened the ceremony with a
prayer. A speech praising the
courage of veterans was
followed by the sounding of
retreat, during which the flag
was lowered.
After a 21-gun salute, taps
was sounded ending the
ceremony.
New Exchange Program Planned
The YM-YWCA is currently
the process of organizing a
in
new exchange program similar
to the Toronto Exchange.
"We feel that when over
200 people apply for the
Students
Courses In Dor:
Major changes in the
procedure for pre-registering
courses to be taught in
residence colleges during the
Spring semester were
announced today by Dr. Harry
Smith, Special Assistant to the
Chancellor for Residence
College Development.
Under the new method,
students will be able to request
the hour and location they
want for any of the 33 "R" or
residence college courses. This
is significantly different from
last semester when students
were arbitrarily placed in
residence college sections
regardless of the dorm they
were living in.
"Now, nobody will be put
in a class they don't want to be
in," Smith asserted.
To pre-register for an "R"
section a student must get a
pink permission slip from his
college master, indicating that
he lives in the dorm the course
will be taught in; the student
should then give this form to
his advisor who will place him
in the desired section.
Smith emphasized that the
"R" courses offered next
semester are scheduled in
"prime" time: mostly in mid
or late afternoon hours.
In addition to the
traditional residence college
courses (Mod. Civ., etc.
Semester
Students will voice their
opinions in a campus-w.de
referendum today concerning
whether or not The
University of North Carolina at
f i
ornHemic calendar so that final
pxams wui
sii
be
held before
ending the
ru.icm!l thUS
strnesteT before the Christmas
h TheS;esoU.Uon is the result
f a bill passed by Student
CsWu"eNov.7toenactt,
provision on the Nov. 12
Draws Large Y Court Crowd
GI Protests Vietnam
By J. D. WILKINSON
DTH Staff Writer
A soldier from Fort Bragg
working at an anti-war
information table in Y-Court
Monday attracted a crowd of
about 150 persons as he
discussed his views and helped
to distribute anti-war
literature.
Will Work In Addition
Toronto Exchange and only
about 30 are accepted counting
the alternates, there is a need
for another program," said
Rodger Dicks, chairman of the
committee working on the
May Ask
English), a few new courses are
slated: Sociology 52R; a
discussion section of Classics
34; and, for the first time,
Philosophy 99R.
Philosophy 99K, Ideals and
Society, is an accredited three
hour elective exclusively for
Scott College residents. It will
be taught by Scott's three
faculty fellows.
Dr. Smith's office described
it as "dealing with problems
and ideas that are of interest
concern to students and the
three faculty fellows, and
drawing upon some of the
great writings in the Western
tradition ..."
Thirteen Tapped
AU
Eleven undergraduates and
two honoraries were tapped
into Valkyries Tuesday night in
a ceremony that ended with a
pre-dawn induction into the
highest women's honorary on
campus.
The all-night tapping was
done by present members of
Valkyries. Masked and clad in
Referendum Today
campus election ballot.
According to Student Body
Vice President Charlie Mercer,
the student bodies of the other
branches of the Consolidated
University at Charlotte,
-
Raleigh, and Greensboro have
already expressed their support
for such a proposal.
"This campus has not yet
taken a position," said Mercer.
"When we do, the
Consolidated University
Student Council (CUSC) can
Part Of Group Protesting
. Protest Group Was Outnumbered
The soldier. Pvt. Keith
Jones, was working with
members of the United
Anti-War Mobilization Front,
(UAWMF) a coalition group
consisting of representaties
from the Southern Student
Organizing Committee,
Students for a Democratic
Society, the Young Socialist
Alliance, and other
To Toronto Program
formation of a new program.
The new program will not
be in competition with the
Toronto Exchange but will be
working in addition to it.
Dicks said, "We hope to be
able to work with the Toronto
Exchange once we get out
program started."
The committee is currently
considering going to another
school in Canada, a school in
Mexico, a school in Latin
America, a school in South
America or another school in
the U.S.
"We are thinking about such
alternatives as going as far as
Peru or as near as a school in
the western part of this
country," said Dicks.
In order to plan the
activities of the program, there
will be a meeting for all
interested students in Garrard
Hall tonight at 7:30.
"The idea of the meeting
will be to discuss any and all
arrangements for the program
including finances and places
to go," Dicks said.
"We hope to develop a core
of interested students. Then we
could work similiar to the way
the racial dialogue was
- Niglit Tapping Performed
black robes, they entered
women's dorms and sororities
after closing hours announced
only by the traditional striking
of a brass gong.
New members were chosen
on the basis of service,
leadership, scholarship and
character. Citations were read
acknowledging the qualities
begin work."
In order for the change to
be effected, it will have to be
approved on all four campuses.
The referendum will be an
expression to the Consolidated
University administration that
students are or are not in favor
of this.
"The Drimarv goal is to see
. J?w. .vnp
if students do want some type
of semester ending before
Christmas," concluded Mercer.
"We are not trying to set up a
specific system yet."
i if " N
. J DTH Staff Photo by Tom Schnabcl
Veterans Day Observance
By Navy and Air Force ROTC Units
organizations.
Charles Mann, information
director for the UAWMF, said
Jones came to UNC "to
express his feeling against the
war in Vietnam."
Jones was also scheduled to
visit Duke, North Carolina
College, Shaw, Chapel Hill
High School, and Duke High
School Monday afternoon.
started," said Dicks.
"Right now we plan to take
about as many students as the
Toronto Exchange but it could
get larger if the interest is
there.
"The program will also
depend on where we go and
the financial support we get.
We are currently getting funds
from various industries and
foundations across the state,"
Dicks said.
The idea for another
program came up when it was
discovered that many of the
(Continued on page 6)
Beat Dook Ticket Sales
Tickets are now on sale for the Carolina Union Series j::
productions during Duke Weekend, Nov. 22 and 23,
featuring Judy Collins on Friday night and the Association :
on Saturday evening. ' ::
Student tickets for Judy Collins are $1.25 and for the
Association are $2.00.
They will be on sale at the G.M. Information Desk :v
Monday through Thursday, 9:00 A.M. to 10:00 P.M.; :
Friday, 9 a.m. until midnight; and on Saturday from 9 to :
noon. Tickets may be bought from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on the i
days of the concerts, and after 6:45 p.m. tickets may be :
purchased at the door. :
and merits of the following
initiates:
Miss Barbara Barrett: One
who has exemplified both the
academic and leadership ideals
of the university and of the
Valkyries.
Through her diligent work
in the Panhellenic Council as
both Vice-President and Rush
Counselor Advisor, she has
shown both injenuity and
dedication to the improvement
of the Greek system.
Her excellent scholastic
performance in her chosen
field of psychology further
displays her goal to achieve
great ideals.
Miss Doritha Ann Bishop:
One who has served her
dormitory, residence college,
sorority and University with
unselfish dedication for three
? , " L- Ud proviuwi
leadership as Chairman of the
1-nirr Clin I : J A
East Cobb House Council and
as President of East Cobb.
She has been loyal to
Morehead Residence College
from its earliest stages and has
W
ar
Mann said they were visiting
the various campuses "to ask
people to come to Fort Bragg
on the next two weekends to
hand out pamphlets and talk to
soldiers who are against the
war."
"After
we reach these
people (the soldiers)," Mann
continued, "we plan to have
them lead a demonstration,
probably in Chapel Hill."
Jones said there are about a
thousand soldiers at Fort Bragg
who are actively working in
connection with anti-war
programs.
The UAWMF is currently
working with three of these
men, according to Mann.
They are Pfc. Walter Kos,
who is being court-martialed
for his activities, Pvt. Joseph
Miles, who has been restricted
to the base and "harassed"
according to Jones and Mann,
and Pvt. Jones, who is
expecting to be transferred out
of the area soon and who says
he is being watched by agents
of the Criminal Investigation
Division.
The table in Y Court
Monday was manned by Jones,
(Continued on page 6)
By
Valkyries
By Old Members
given of her self to her sorority
as a charter member, as pledge
trainer, and as a member of the
executive board. She is
dedicated to her chosen field
of psychology.
Miss Jeanne Blair: One who
has endeavored diligently
within her chosen field of the
Fine Arts. She has performed
consistently with the
Playmakers for three years and
has achieved several leading
roles.
At the same time she
utilizes her schedule to fulfill
in a thorough manner her
duties to her sorority and to
her scholarship.
Mrs. Sue Bennett Cobb:
One who has proven herself to
be, not only an excellent
student by maintaining a high
average in her chosen field of
Physical Therapy, but also an
excellent leader by working to
irrirove the program of the
Women's Athletic Association
since her Freshman year.
She was chosen Most
Outstanding Dormitory
iiderway
By BOBBY NOWELL
DTH Staff Writer
Class instruction programs
in Physical Education and
intramural athletics are to be
resumed for the second half of
the fall semester as a result of
the Chapel Hill community's
recovery from a two-month
drought, Chancellor J. Carlyle
Sitterson announced Monday.
In a memorandum released
to University deans, directors,
and department heads,
Sitterson related: "Careful
analyses of water supply and
water consumption rates to
date indicate that, on a trial
basis, the University can now
resume its programs which had
to be suspended about six
weeks ago when our water
shortage reached the point of
crisis."
The Chapel Hill Town
Board of Aldermen were to
meet Monday night to consider
removing a recently passed
ordinance which prohibited the
washing of cars, sprinkling of
lawns, and operation of
water-cooled air conditioners.
The Chancellor's statement
emphasized, however, that the
water shortage is not over and
"we must all continue to use
all reasonable means to
conserve water."
Dr. Claiborne Jones,
assistant to the Chancellor, said
the community has had five
and one quarter inches of rain
since mid-October, when the
worst effects of the drought
were being felt.
"University Lake is still
way down," he said, "but we
have reached some 'breathing
space' and the Chancellor
concluded it wasn't fair to
keep the normal programs of
the University cut back any
longer."
"If things go sour on this
trial plan, we can only go back
to the previous situation, but
we hope this little breathing
spell here will tide us over until
.Nixon Endorses Johnson's
Vietnam
WASHINGTON (UPI) -President-elect
Richard M.
Nixon Monday generally
endorsed the Johnson
administration's strategy for
seeking peace in Vietnam and
warned against expecting any
drastic foreign policy changes
when he takes over the White
House.
With President Johnson
standing by his side after the
one and one-half hour White
House briefing, Nixon also said
he would support
administration policy during
Representative and her
leadership is exemplified in her
selection as WAA
Vice-President and President
for this year.
Miss Joyce Davis: One who
has worked diligently and
unselfishly for the betterment
of the student community
through her work as a Student
Legislator distinguishing herselt
as Secretary of the Unance
Committee, as a member of the
Publications Board, the
Women's Residence Council,
and the Carolina Women's
Council.
She has demonstrated both
ability and creativity as
freshman Women's
Co-ordinator for Orientation
and is' currently serving as
editor of the Course and
Teacher Evaluation Booklet.
She has exemplified the
highest leadership,
responsibility and devotion.
Miss Gwen Hightower: One
who has displayed her
dedication to the university in.
(Continued on page 5)
we can get out of the danger
zone.
r I u.j
ue auura.
looks as if we'll have a
"It
good chance of making it."
Dr. Jones noted that
although November is normally
a dry month, the cooler
weather would require students
to bathe less frequently. Also
Sc
run ion
Speech At UNC
On Thursday
Former Governor William W. Scranton of Pennsylvania will
speak in Memorial Hall Thursday at 8 p.m., it was announced
today by Carolina Forum Chairman Scott Goodfellow.
Gov. Scranton, rumored as president-elect Nixon's choice a
Serrptarv of Statp will h in f!hanpl Hill fnr a mextinT rf tho
qq Commission on the Future of Higher Education,
. u 4l .
HHJUg must; abbtruuuiK we
David Riesman, Dr. Clark Kerr Harvard President Nathan M.
Pusey, University of Illinois President David Henry and Notre
Dame President the Reverend Theodore Hesburgh.
Last week, however, Scranton discounted the rumors that he
would be named Secretary of State. He said he had no intentions
to return public life. He noted that he would aid Nixon in any
way the President-elect wished before his inauguration (Jan. 20)
but he would not accept any permanant position.
According to Goodfellow, the format for the program will be a
brief talk by Scranton concerning a recent fact finding trip to
Europe he made for Nixon and its political ramifications,
followed by an extended question-answer session.
The 1964 runner-up for the Republican Presidential
nomination has been described as a "liberal on civil rights, a
. conservative on fiscal policy and an internationalist in foreign
affairs. " During World War II he served as a Lieutenant in the
Army in such areas as North Africa, the Middle East and in the
China-Burma theatre.
In 1959 Scranton joined the personal staff of Secretary of
State John Foster Dulles as special assistant in charge of briefing
the press on State Department policy. He was seated in the 87th
Congresses in 1961 and elected Governor of Pennsylvania the
following election.
Time magazine recently commented that Scranton is "one of
the U.S.'s ablest executives and the Republican Party's brightest
lights."
Peace Strategy
the next two months in the
tense Middle East and toward
improving relations with the
Soviet Union.
Nixon emphasized
continuity of government
during the transition period
between this administration
and the next, and expressed
hope that cooperation between
himself and President Johnson
could bring "some significant
progress towards peace" before
the Jan. 20 inauguration.
This transition period,
Nixon said, is different from
ones in the past because "this
nation at this time in its
foreign policy has several
matters Vietnam of course at
the top of the list which
cannot wait decision and
cannot afford a gap of two
months in which no action
occurs.
"If however, the action is
to occur, if progress is to be
made on matters like Vietnam,
the current possible crisis in
Middle East, relations between
the United States and the
Soviet Union with regard to
certain outstanding matters if
progress is to be made in any
of these fields, it can be only
made if the parties on the
other side realize that the
current administration is
setting forth policies that will
be carried forward by the next
administration," he said.
Nixon said that during the
meeting with Johnson and his
top advisers, "I gave assurance
in each instance to the
secretary of state and, of
course, to the President, that
they could speak not just for
this administration but for the
nation, and that meant the
next administration as well."
Nixon said he thought his
talks with the President were
"helpful ... from the
standpoint of seeing to it that
in these next 60 days this very
Ag
am
Thanksgiving and Christmas
vacations are coming up so
"the calendar seems to be on
our side," according to Dr.
Jones.
Both the Chancellor and
Dr. Jones praised the student
body for "a marvelous effort in
(Continued on page 6)
Pla
ns
vsuuuuiaaiuu iiicewwf; nui uc t i .
critical period rather than
having the lapse of the lame
duck presidency in effect, we
might have very significant
action and progress towards
peace."
Nixon's remarks appeared
to be a warning to both North
and South Vietnam they would
not benefit from a delay of
peace talks until his
administration takes over.
During the meeting with
Johnson, Nixon was briefed on
foreign policy matters by
Secretary of State Dean Rusk.
Defense Secretary Clark Clifford
CIA Director Richard Helms,
Presidential advisor Walt
Rostow, and Gen. Earle G.
Wheeler, chairman of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff.
The discussions involved
Vietnam, the Middle East,
Europe and NATO.
Johnson described the
meetings as a "very thorough
briefing" and hinted at further
such meetings. "I realize that
the American people have a
right to the government that
efficiently functions at all
times."
Johnson then said that his
meeting was a "very pleasant
and cooperative meeting as I
expect the meetings to be in
the days ahead."
The President and Mrs.
Johnson and the
President-elect and Mrs. Nixon
met for lunch in the family
dining room at the White
House from 1:20 p.m. to 2:48
p.m. when the two men went
to the President's oval office.
They were in the office
briefly when they went to the
adjoining cabinet room where
they met for an hour and 28
minute session with the
various administration advisers.
At 4:19 p.m. Nixon and
Johnson returned to the oval
office where they remained
until they met with reporters
    

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